Alternative WWI Army Service Detail Sources

Posted by Jennifer Holik on June 26, 2018 in Guest Bloggers

Searching for information on Army military service from World War I can be a bit difficult for some researchers due to the 1973 fire at the National Personnel Records Center (NPRC). We tend to think we have to only look for World War I Army service information at the NPRC and if the records burned, Read More

5 Genealogy Goals for the Family Archivist

Posted by Denise May Levenick on February 12, 2018 in Guest Bloggers

Genealogists wear many hats — researcher, writer, preservationist, archivist. We always want more time to track down our elusive ancestors, but if you inherited family photos, documents, or keepsakes, there’s no time like the present to safely preserve your treasures for the next generation. Here is a list of family history tips to help you Read More

4 Reasons to Join a Genealogical Society

Posted by Linda Barnickel on December 15, 2017 in Guest Bloggers

Given the immense quantity of material available through Ancestry and elsewhere online, you may not have considered the many benefits of joining a genealogical society. Societies range in size from a few dozen to thousands of members, and typically have a focus. That focus could be based in geography, surname, nationality, or ethnic group. Automatically, Read More

Locating World War I Photographs

Posted by Jennifer Holik on December 1, 2017 in Guest Bloggers, Research

I talk to a lot of European World War I and World War II researchers who have adopted the graves of our American service members who are buried in American Battle Monument Commission (ABMC) Cemeteries. The number one thing each seeks is a photograph of their adopted soldier, sailor, or Marine. So, just where might Read More

The Report of My Death Was an Exaggeration

Posted by Ellen Notbohm on November 2, 2017 in Guest Bloggers

This article originally appeared in Ancestry Magazine, Sept-Oct 2009. James Ross Clemens, a cousin of mine, was seriously ill two or three weeks ago in London but is well now. The report of my illness grew out of his illness. The report of my death was an exaggeration. — Mark Twain Obituaries. Like heirlooms, they Read More

Flesh and Bones

Posted by Mary Gorman on October 26, 2017 in Guest Bloggers

This article originally appeared in Ancestry Magazine, Sept-Oct 2008.  A picture brings life to life, maybe more so in family history than anywhere else. What a relative looked like, his or her attitude, quirks, interests—looking at a photo changes someone from a name to flesh and bones. But what if you have no photo? You Read More

Stories Told in Stone

Posted by Gaylord Cooper on October 23, 2017 in Guest Bloggers

This article originally appeared in Ancestry Magazine, Sept-Oct 2009. Tombstones are another great source of posthumous information. The carvings on gravestones, called icons, were and still are used as a type of shorthand for stone carvers. Each icon conveys a greater idea, thereby saving time and expense (and space). Tombstone icons can give information about Read More

Family Foodways

Posted by Linda Barnickel on October 18, 2017 in Guest Bloggers

Merriam-Webster’s dictionary perhaps says it best. Foodways are the “eating habits and culinary practices of a people, region, or historical time period.” Foodways include the growth and production of food, methods of cooking, spices, who cooked the food, social occasions, and special events. Even the intangibles such as aroma, food’s association with memories, folktales and Read More