Mexican Research: Not Just For “Dia de los Muertos” Anymore

Posted by Sandy Olney on November 14, 2017 in ProGenealogists, Website

In the not too distant past, “many people of Mexican descent only thought about researching their ancestry on the Day of the Dead,” according to Evan Christensen, a genealogist at AncestryProGenealogists. But that wasn’t due to a lack of interest in their rich family histories. In fact, AncestryProGenealogists research team manager Joseph Shumway believes that Read More

The Report of My Death Was an Exaggeration

Posted by Ellen Notbohm on November 2, 2017 in Guest Bloggers

This article originally appeared in Ancestry Magazine, Sept-Oct 2009. James Ross Clemens, a cousin of mine, was seriously ill two or three weeks ago in London but is well now. The report of my illness grew out of his illness. The report of my death was an exaggeration. — Mark Twain Obituaries. Like heirlooms, they Read More

Flesh and Bones

Posted by Mary Gorman on October 26, 2017 in Guest Bloggers

This article originally appeared in Ancestry Magazine, Sept-Oct 2008.  A picture brings life to life, maybe more so in family history than anywhere else. What a relative looked like, his or her attitude, quirks, interests—looking at a photo changes someone from a name to flesh and bones. But what if you have no photo? You Read More

Stories Told in Stone

Posted by Gaylord Cooper on October 23, 2017 in Guest Bloggers

This article originally appeared in Ancestry Magazine, Sept-Oct 2009. Tombstones are another great source of posthumous information. The carvings on gravestones, called icons, were and still are used as a type of shorthand for stone carvers. Each icon conveys a greater idea, thereby saving time and expense (and space). Tombstone icons can give information about Read More

Family Foodways

Posted by Linda Barnickel on October 18, 2017 in Guest Bloggers

Merriam-Webster’s dictionary perhaps says it best. Foodways are the “eating habits and culinary practices of a people, region, or historical time period.” Foodways include the growth and production of food, methods of cooking, spices, who cooked the food, social occasions, and special events. Even the intangibles such as aroma, food’s association with memories, folktales and Read More

World War I Records on Fold3.com

Posted by Jennifer Holik on October 11, 2017 in Guest Bloggers

I’ve found one of the best ways to search what is available on Fold3 is to search within the records of a particular conflict. I wrote a little about this concept in my WWII article, Combining World War II Research on Fold3 With Your Ancestry Family Tree on this blog in April 2016. The same Read More

October is American Archives Month

Posted by Linda Barnickel on October 10, 2017 in Guest Bloggers

October is American Archives Month, and institutions throughout the country are celebrating! Here are seven ways you can get involved: 1) Attend an event Many archives will be having special events throughout the month. These might include open houses, lectures, tours, exhibits or other activities. Check the websites of nearby repositories, including college campuses, public Read More

What to Know About World War I Burial Files

Posted by Jennifer Holik on September 29, 2017 in Guest Bloggers

A couple of months ago I wrote an article about the Ancestry collection of U.S. Army Transport Service Passenger Lists 1910-1939. If you review that article, near the end I talk about my great-granduncle Michael Kokoska’s ship manifest, on which it shows he is deceased. In that article I mention briefly the World War I Read More