Wanted! Criminals and reward systems revealed in new Irish Police Gazette records

Posted by Kristen Hyde on August 22, 2016 in Collections, Ireland, Website

Our new Irish Police Gazette records from 1863-1893 give fascinating insight into the crimes, wanted criminals, reward systems and missing persons in Ireland during the Victorian era. The Ireland, Police Gazettes, 1861-1893 records are extracted from ‘Hue and Cry’, the official publication of the Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC) which operated in Ireland from 1814-1922. ‘Hue Read More

Using WWI Registration Cards to trace your ancestors

Posted by Kristen Hyde on August 19, 2016 in Collections, United Kingdom

Ancestry Content Acquisition Manager, Rhona Murray talks about the value of WWI registration cards in tracing your ancestors movements during this period. Start exploring our new WWI Registration Cards for Bexley on Ancestry. The first National Registration exercise in the United Kingdom was taken during the First World War. The National Registration Act came in Read More

Finding Canadian Lovebirds in Ontario Records

Posted by Ancestry Team on August 9, 2016 in Canada, Collections

Analysis of historic visitor records from Niagara Falls has revealed how one of Canada’s top tourist destinations earned its reputation as the honeymoon capital of the world. Recent research shows that August is Canada’s most popular month to wed – and to celebrate the 500-year-old tradition of taking a vacation after the big day, Ancestry Read More

Somerset to be bowled over by digitisation of millions of historical records

Posted by Bryony Partridge on July 14, 2016 in Collections, United Kingdom, Website

A cricket legend, foreign secretary and Christmas card pioneer are among those you can find in our new Somerset collection which includes over seven million historical records containing centuries of details of Somerset residents. Digitised from original records held by the South West Heritage Trust, the collections hold details of births, deaths, marriages and school Read More

Collaboration in World War II Research

Posted by Jennifer Holik on June 29, 2016 in Collections

Most of us have heard that two heads are better than one. This is especially true with World War II research. Just as with any genealogical research, one person does not know everything. One database or record repository does not have all the records or the entire story. Working together, collaborating, through different avenues, we Read More

Breathtaking Historic Photographs Digitized to Bring Canada’s Past To Life

Posted by Ancestry Team on June 28, 2016 in Canada, Collections

A collection of more than 3,000 historic photographs of Canada, spanning 25 years from post-Confederation to the First World War, have been published online for the first time. The photographs are part of two new historic Canadian collections made available on Ancestry, to celebrate Canada Day. The first collection, Canada, Photographic Albums of Settlement (1892-1917), include thousands Read More

Victorian Prisoners in Gloucester Gaol, 1815-1879

Posted by Bryony Partridge on June 17, 2016 in Collections, United Kingdom, Website

Liz Jack, author of A Rogue’s Gallery: Victorian Prisoners in Gloucester Gaol, explores the youngest and oldest prisoners to be incarcerated at Gloucestershire Gaol. To explore the Gloucestershire Gaol Registers 1815-1879, head to Ancestry.co.uk. In Victorian times, there was no distinction between children and adults when it came to custodial sentences. Some children as young Read More

100 years on: Admiral John Rushworth Jellicoe & the Battle of Jutland

Posted by Bryony Partridge on May 31, 2016 in Collections, United Kingdom

To mark the centenary of the Battle of Jutland, ProGenealogist Joanna Cicely Fennell, M.A.G.I., explores the family roots of its commander, Admiral John Rushworth Jellicoe. John Rushworth Jellicoe was born in Southampton on 5 December 1859. He was the second son of Merchant Navy captain, John Henry Jellicoe, and his wife, Lucy Henrietta Keel. The Read More