Posted by Ancestry Team on June 19, 2019 in AncestryDNA

At Ancestry®, we leverage the latest cutting-edge DNA science and technology to deliver detailed historical insights that empower you to uncover more about your family’s origins.

Today, we released over 225 new AncestryDNA® communities to help our members who have ties to France, Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand, empowering them to unlock even more discoveries about their family history. Utilizing our DNA network of over 15 million people, our vast collection of public family trees, and our patented Genetic Communities™ technology, AncestryDNA is able to identify groups of people with shared DNA and determine where their ancestors likely lived over the past 75-300 years.

French American and Canadian Communities

We’ve added 35+ new French American communities and 120+ new Canadian communities, with greater insights about British Canadian, French Canadian, and Acadian settlers. As one example, members with ties to Acadian settlers may learn that their Acadian ancestors played a significant role in Nova Scotia or Louisiana history. Acadians, who once resided in Nova Scotia, fell under British governance in 1713, and between 1755 and 1764, nearly all Acadians were expelled from Nova Scotia and migrated as far south as Louisiana. Many Acadians, or “Cadiens” as they coined themselves, decided to establish new lives in areas near the Mississippi River and New Orleans. It was in these new communities that some Acadians flourished as cotton, wheat, sugar, and tobacco farmers.

United Kingdom Communities

With 73 new United Kingdom communities, you might discover a link to family near Greater London and learn where your ancestors lived during the bustling Industrial Revolution, which began in the late 1700s. Game-changing advances in agriculture and technology spurred countless countryside merchants, bakers, butchers, brewers, tailors, and other rural workers to relocate to opportunity-filled cities, like London, laying the foundation for some of England’s great modern cities.

Australian and New Zealand Communities

We’ve added 14 new communities for descendents of primarily British settlers in Australia and New Zealand. During the late 1700s, Great Britain’s population was skyrocketing. Prisons were reaching capacity and agricultural resources were stretched thin. As a solution, in 1787, 11 ships sailed from England to Australia to establish a new colony. Despite limited resources and drought, British settlers were able to attract a continuous flow of migrants as they founded new communities, cities, and cultures throughout Australia and New Zealand.

We encourage you to view your DNA story again, as you may notice a new community waiting to be explored and shared with your family and other loved ones.

With 15 million people tested, AncestryDNA has the largest consumer DNA network in the world. As new people continue to join our AncestryDNA network and science and technology continue to evolve, we expect that the number and granularity of communities offered will continue to increase. This latest update is just one of many that you can expect on your journey of personal discovery.

A list of all regions can be found here.

38 Comments

  1. Andrew Gillim

    Wow, this is awesome! About 13 of my old tests that I manage have been updated! I really like the new communities!

  2. Janice

    I’m wondering if, via our DNA match list, we will be able to view the different regional matches. I am happy to see that I have a few new regions but it would be nice to pull up those regional matches from the list of matches, as we were able to do (previously) with the genetic communities. It is interesting that some of my Scot DNA matches appear in all three Scottish communities that encompass Scottish central lowlands, lowlands, Northern England, Northern Ireland, and Southwest Scotland …

  3. Kalani Mondoy

    Still waiting for the separation of Philippines & Guam genetic community.

    And most importantly, can we redirect our focus OFF of all European-descended groups just a little bit and try to see that if you will not separate the Polynesia category but feel obligated to list Hawaii, Samoa & Tonga, to at least include Maori in there given the large number of Maoris testing from New Zealand and also in Australia. Have you even looked at the population of Samoans and Tongans compared to Maoris?

    Kalani

    • Alan

      Appreciate your concern but hopefully you can cut Ancestry some slack as I am sure there are many much, much larger genetic communities that have yet to be separated.

  4. Adele

    Is it possible to get records from the islands of St. Pierre et Miquelon, France? And for migration to the islands from Pyrenees French Basque region?

  5. Kylie

    I bet I’m not the only one cringing about the genetic communities in Australia all being labelled “British”. My father who is 96% Irish with only Irish genetic communities has been tagged with this Australian ‘British’ genetic community, and it really grates. It once again feels like the Irish are being overlooked when it comes to who makes up modern Australia. Perhaps something like “English, Irish, Scottish and Welsh settlers to NSW” would have worked?

  6. VirginiaLB

    My results have not changed since last September’s update. They don’t show my northern Spanish roots at all–great-grandfather from Asturias. We have civil and church records back to the 1700s. I think it’s under NW Europe?? Ancestry virtually ignores Spain in their records. And my many Irish ancestors don’t show all my regions. I have quite a few from Meath-Westmeath and Antrim. Those regions don’t show in my results. The East Cork and North Munster crowd is there however.

  7. A van Helsdingen

    I am 44% British and Irish, yet I do not and have never had any GCs. The GCs were a major reason for me purchasing the test, so I am quite disappointed that 15 months later I still do not have any GCs.

    Are there any plans for new GCs in continential Europe?

  8. dorothy Hurl

    Was it a mistake on the first results of my test when it saw European Jew and Native American as less than 1? New test show only irish and english.

    • Lois

      It seems much too generalized now. Mine is missing my Germanic European ancestry, which I know is there. No mention of Ashkenazi Jew ancestry through my European ancestry. I feel like I’ve wasted a lot of money here.

  9. Dale Drake

    I found these newest revisions to communities very interesting. However, you have labelled the Southwestern Louisiana community “French Creole”, along with the Acadia, Lafayette & St. Martin community and the St. Martin community. I belong to all three and this DNA assignment definitely matches my genealogy results. However, the people in these communities are Acadian, not French Creole. The term “French Creole” applies, in the 19th century, to second generation descendants of French settlers in Louisiana. The Acadians did originally come from France, but as your blog states, they then lived for over 100 years in Acadie, now Nova Scotia, before being forcibly deported between 1755 and 1764. They identified themselves as Acadian, not French. Please consider relabelling these communities “Acadian.” Thank you.

    • Jean B

      I have a question for the Creole community!

      My late grandmother have always taught us about our Creole culture. She’s originally from Mississippi, and so is my late grandfather. My dad took the DNA ancestry test and it showed “Mississippi and Louisiana African Americans.” Now here’s where the problem resides…

      I’ve seen others test results on YouTube and in groups and it mentioned Louisiana French Creole, or Creole and African Americans in their ethnicity! However… in my dad’s *community* It mentioned “…that African Americans pushed back and created a unique Creole culture…” Are they saying my dad is Creole
      ..??? Or not??? since it is his community! And why isn’t at the top like other people results I’ve seen?

      It shows that my family was in Louisiana and Mississippi in 1775 until-current (which they would have been in the colony during the creolazation era) meaning that: anyone born into the colony is Creole regardless; of their mixture, or heritage (German Creole, Irish Creole, African Creole, Spainish Creole, French Creole, or Dutch Creole! My dad does have French, Irish, German and British heritage! My dad African heritage is Benin and Togo which also links our African heritage to Louisiana and Mississippi during the creolazation… I will like to hear you guys opinions on this one.

      Thanks

  10. Grant

    I wish mine would be in a community. I am apparently mostly UK but I don’t have ANY genetic communities. Is this because the site updates users over time?

  11. George E Brooks

    I took your DNA test and I want written report of my test
    and please don’t tell me that you don’t send out paper reports

  12. JeanB

    Hello Everyone, I have a question for the Creole community!

    My late grandmother have always taught us about our Creole culture. She’s originally from Mississippi, and so is my late grandfather. My dad took the DNA ancestry test and it showed “Mississippi and Louisiana African Americans.” Now here’s where the problem resides…

    I’ve seen others test results on YouTube and in groups and it mentioned Louisiana French Creole, or Creole and African Americans in their ethnicity! However… in my dad’s *additional community* It mentioned “…that African Americans pushed back and created a unique Creole culture…” Are they saying my dad is Creole
    ..??? Or not??? since it is his community! And why isn’t at the top like other people results I’ve seen?

    It shows that my family was in Louisiana and Mississippi in 1775 until-current (which they would have been in the colony during the creolazation era) meaning that: anyone born into the colony is Creole regardless; of their mixture, or heritage (German Creole, Irish Creole, African Creole, Spainish Creole, French Creole, or Dutch Creole! My dad does have French, Irish, German and British heritage! My dad African heritage is Benin and Togo which also links our African heritage to Louisiana and Mississippi during the creolazation… I will like to hear you guys opinions on this one.

    Thanks

    • JeanB

      *Community History* not “additional communities” Here it is, as follow:

      Community History

      ‘Most of the people in this community can trace their ancestry back to West Africa in the present-day Republic of Cameroon, Republic of the Congo, Nigeria, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Benin, and Togo. Enslaved Africans arrived via the ports of New Orleans and Biloxi to labor in the cotton, sugar, and lumber industries. Free blacks survived by taking on skilled positions in urban areas. After the Civil War, African Americans became sharecroppers and independent wage laborers. They also pushed back against segregation and created a unique Creole culture. But by the 1930s, many looked for more freedom and prosperity by moving north to Chicago. 1775

    • Dale Drake

      Hi Jean! Yes, the term “Creole” is definitely confusing, which is why I qualified it in my question about Acadians above: “The term “French Creole” applies, in the 19th century, to second generation descendants of French settlers in Louisiana.” In the 20th century the term became commonly used for the African American communities in Louisiana. I don’t know much more than that. My point to the blog writer is that Acadians aren’t French Creoles and therefore I’d appreciate them renaming our communities in Southwest Louisiana.

      Your community sounds fascinating – good luck with your research!

  13. Ani

    It would be great if one could still click on any users name on the site, and see if one matches them, the way one could prior to the new Beta version. That was such an incredibly useful DNA feature. Matches above the 5th cousin level rarely show shared matches on Ancestry. Clicking on member’s username drop down, I could go right down the line of all the DNA tests I administer, and all the trees that are shared and toggled with mine and see who in the family matched the user. In the space of a three seconds I knew exactly what lines they matched. Please think of putting that feature back and also putting, “Last Viewed Match” back in the top drop down menu. If you accidentally close match window, there is no way to get back to the match, if you don’t recall their username or a few of the names in their tree, you can’t even access it via ” check for similar surname. I seem unable to get my DNA notes sections to work. When I open the box and add notes to them and then click on the X to close the box, it’s is empty, and nothing has saved. Can’t you move the match headers up on the page and put the note section back where it was. It’s just annoying have to click on something to see my notes. Wish you would put stared matches back as well. Creating colored coded DNA groups is the only thing I like about this update, but I still would like to consign matches into starred and unstarred groups along with color coded groups. I should not have, to have a public tree to get all my DNA matches, or maximized match function. That’s just silly. My tree should have no baring on what DNA matches I receive. Since a week prior to the mandatory switch over to Beta, I have not received a match other than in the 6th cousin range. That is highly unusual. Is anyone else having this issue?

  14. Edward

    But what about Germany and Netherlands? you are literally incapable to identity German/Netherlands ancestry and always consider that as “English “.

  15. Lynn Luick

    Because of your dna test I found three half brothers and two half sisters after 70 years. They didn’t know I was even around

  16. Christine DeForest

    I was very disappointed when my results came in and didn’t show my maternal grandparents migration from Europe (France) to Canada then to So. California. There was NO evidence of this. I have records from my grandmother that gives times and dates of their families. Made me question my results.

    • Alec van Helsdingen

      DNA can’t determine the exact movements of a particular ancestor, because travelling doesn’t change your DNA. What the “Migrations” do is use family trees and DNA together to track large scale migrations. This is hard to do, and so there is a high threshold of evidence to be assigned a “migration”, “subregion” or “genetic community”. Not getting one doesn’t mean you don’t have ancestry from that area. It may just be that the evidence is insufficient at this point in time. Traditional genealogy remains the best way to find out the precise details of your ancestors.

  17. Ani

    Would be great if “Last Viewed Match” was placed back in the DNA category’s drop down menu. Also would love it if you would bring back the ability to click on any username, and see if we, or any of the tests we administer match that user. That was such an incredibly useful Ancestry feature.

  18. Lori

    It’s nice that you have so many European-based DNA communities and groups. It’s amazing, the dozens of regions and areas. However, the “Native American” group could use some serious help. If you aren’t from the southwest US, Mexico or Central or northern South America, apparently there is no difference in the Native populations of the Arctic Circle and the Andes. Most of the western hemisphere is homogenous, excluding the Creoles.

Join the Discussion

We really do appreciate your feedback, and ask that you please be respectful to other commenters and authors. Any abusive comments may be moderated. For help with a specific problem, please contact customer service.