Posted by Bryony Partridge on January 7, 2019 in AncestryDNA, Canada, Contest

Ancestry New Years AncestryDNA Facebook and Instagram Competition Terms and Conditions

The Promoter of the competition is Ancestry Ireland Unlimited Company, 70 Sir John Rogerson Quay, Dublin 2.

The competition is open to Canadian residents aged 18 or over with a valid Facebook or Instagram account, except employees of the Promoter or its group companies, their immediate families and their agents.

Competition begins January 11, 2019 at 9:00 AM (ET). Closing date is January 17, 2019 at 11:59 PM (ET).

One entry per person per platform.

To enter, entrants must visit and follow the Ancestry Canada Facebook Page (https://www.facebook.com/AncestryCa/) or the Ancestry Canada Instagram Channel (https://www.instagram.com/ancestryca/) during the promotion period and on the competition post(s), they must respond with their family history New Year’s resolution in a comment in the Facebook post or Instagram post.

No responsibility can be accepted for entries incomplete, delayed or not received. Entrants are responsible for obtaining any necessary consent(s) required for the posts they submit as their entry in this competition. By submitting their posts, entrants give Ancestry permission to use the submitted posts for promotional, marketing and publicity purposes now and in the future.

Two (2) prize winners will be chosen by an independent person after the closing date. Winners will be chosen at random with one (1) winner selected from Facebook and one (1) winner selected from Instagram.

Each prize winner will receive an AncestryDNA test.

There is no cash alternative for the prize and it is non-transferable.

The winner will be notified via a reply to the comment that they posted on the AncestryCA Facebook Page or AncestryCA Instagram Channel within 72 hours of the closing date and via a private message on both platforms. Winners must respond to the private message or direct message and provide a full name, valid email and postal address for the prize to be delivered to.

If a winner does not respond to the private message or direct message with the required contact details within one week of receipt of the message, the Promoter reserves the right to re-award the prize with no further obligation or liability to the initial winners. At this point, the Promoter will inform the winner that they are moving on to a runner up.

The Promoter’s decision is final and binding. The Promoter reserves the right to modify, cancel or withdraw the competition without notice. This competition is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Facebook or Instagram. Entrants acknowledge that they are providing their information to the Promoter and not to Facebook or Instagram and to the extent permitted by law, releases Facebook and Instagram from any and all liability in relation to this competition. Any questions, comments or complaints about this promotion must be directed to the Promoter and not to Facebook or Instagram.

For details of the winners, write to Ancestry Ireland Unlimited Company, at the above address. Any personal information received by the Promoter in connection with this prize draw will be used solely in accordance with the Promoter’s Privacy Statement and you also consent to the Promoter using your name and county of residence for administrative purposes relating to the competition.

 

Bryony Partridge

Bryony is the International PR Manager for Ancestry where she implements strategic communications and social media programs that bring increased media awareness for the company.

13 Comments

  1. Me

    I have sent the message below repeatedly but cannot get a reaction from ancestry.com. So I have decided to add it to each new blog that comes out until I get a response from ancestry.com. A record is available on the ancestry.com “search” site and it comes to me as a “leaf”. It is a tourist visa to a South American country, which I obtained in the mid 1960s, which mentions my name, my birth date, my birth place, it has a picture of me, the names of both my parents, as well as the address where I lived when I obtained that visa. This record was NOT provided by me nor anyone else who knows me (since nobody other than the government and I even know about this short term visa). What more would any identity thief need to steal my identity?? Here we have to wait another year for the 1950 CENSUS RECORDS so as not to invade the privacy of people who were already alive in 1950 and may still be alive today, but ancestry.com feels free to “contribute” such a record as this visa??? For whose benefit??? Who has an ethical or ancestry need to know where I spent my vacation and obtain this much information about me including a picture?? I am still very much alive and police officers have told me that ancestry.com is a place where identity thieves do research and find access to information they should not be able to obtain this easily. I thought that ancestry had rules that protect the living. In the meantime I may contact LIFELOCK and see what they can do to protect me. They have good attorneys working for them.

    • Me

      How interesting that you made all the other blogs disappear that had that message in them. Oh, yeah, I forgot. These other blogs had recipees in them! Too funny!

  2. Becky Gill Thomas-Winkler

    I’ve been searching since 82 & still cannot locate what happened to my 2X grt grandfather Samuel Gill. I’ve use your genealogists to no avail & still haven’t found. It’s gonna take more time & $. Thanks, I need help! Becky

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