Posted by Mike Mulligan on January 25, 2017 in AncestryDNA

Recently my friend Harry asked me if I could look at his AncestryDNA Ethnicity Estimate, as he was a little puzzled by the results. The puzzle for him was he had a fair amount of Irish in his estimate even though he wasn’t aware of any Irish ancestors. I asked him if he had any Scottish ancestry and it turns out his mother is from Edinburgh. In Harry’s case, my hypothesis was that his 37% Irish could be due in part to his Scottish ancestors.

I get asked questions like this quite a lot. Many people find that their estimate does not seem to reflect what they know of their paper ancestry. Specifically, people often ask how they might have Irish in their AncestryDNA Ethnicity Estimate if they have no known Irish ancestors in their tree.  The answer to this is easier to see if you look at the area that the Irish region covers on the AncestryDNA map.

Irish DNA region

If you look at the map you will see that although the Irish estimate primarily represents ancestry from Ireland, it also covers many neighbouring parts of the world – Scotland, Wales, England and parts of North Western Europe. The reason for this is that individuals in this region of the world have moved around a great deal over the past several hundred years — and they’ve taken their DNA with them.  This means that often times, even people with deep roots in a given area can still have a signature of Irish ancestry in their ethnicity estimate, particularly if that area is close to Ireland.

I have written previously about the averages of estimated Irish ancestry for individuals across the UK & Ireland.  But I thought it might be useful to show some examples from friends of mine.

Screen Shot 2017-01-24 at 11.34.06 AM

The chart above is the amount of Irish ancestry estimated for myself and a few friends with different backgrounds.  Starting with my own result, I have an Irish Ethnicity Estimate of 93%, which is typical for a native Irish person.

If we look across the graph, beside my result are Sue, Dan and Harry who are British.  Sue is English with an Irish mum and a Scottish dad. Her estimated Irish ethnicity is 61%.  Dan is Welsh and his estimate is 50%.  Harry is English with a Scottish mother and his estimate is 37%.

Moving further afield is Scott, who has an ancestry estimate of 28% Irish. Scott is American, but as you might guess from his name, he has Scottish ancestry. Finally, there is JP who is French and has an Irish ancestry estimate of 24%. When I saw JP’s ethnicity estimate, I asked him if he had any Northern French ancestry. And sure enough, he does.

As you can see, among my friends the Irish ethnicity estimate decreases as you move away from Ireland.  The estimate is highest with me, then lower for my British friends, then lower again for my friends from further away.

Looking at the results for my friends and I, there are two interesting questions to consider.

  • Why is the region called Ireland and not, for example, Celtic?
  • If I do get an Irish estimate, does it reflect heritage from the island of Ireland or something wider?

Taking the first question, why is the region named Ireland? There are a couple of reasons for this.  But the simplest explanation has to do with the reference panel that is used to determine your estimate. The AncestryDNA reference panel is the set of DNA samples, representing individuals from particular regions around the world, to which your DNA is compared to obtain your ethnicity estimate. The individuals in the reference panel used for Ireland have deep roots in Ireland going back several generations.

Understanding the reference panel is also important in answering the second question.  What an AncestryDNA ethnicity estimate tells you is that you share a genetic ancestry with a given group of people who are intended to represent individuals from a specific place of the world.  That shared genetic ancestry may be hundreds to thousands of years ago.

In the case of Ireland the ethnicity estimate tells you that you share genetic ancestry with modern people of Ireland who have deep roots in Ireland as documented by their pedigrees going back many generations.  However, we also know that even despite these deep roots, the regions neighbouring Ireland have strong historical, and therefore genetic, connections to Ireland too. So, it is natural that these connections would be reflected in the DNA of people from those regions, and therefore in their ethnicity estimates.

How, then, should you interpret your Irish estimate?  The answer to this is to approach it like any family history question and look for supporting evidence.  Do you have documentary evidence indicating Irish or perhaps Scottish ancestry? If so, then the ethnicity estimate is likely corroborating the documentation. Or perhaps your surname is Fraser or Jones, typically Scottish or Welsh surnames. Again, this may be an indicator of a Scottish or Welsh source for your Irish estimate. What you are looking for is multiple sources of evidence telling the same story.

If you don’t have any supporting evidence there could be several explanations for your Irish estimate.  It is very possible that your Irish ancestry is beyond the reach of your paper trail.  However it may also be that your Irish ethnicity estimate may represent ancestry from Scotland or Wales, elsewhere in the UK, or even a bit further afield. But to me, that is one of the exciting things about AncestryDNA.  It is not just an answer to a question but the beginning of a deeper exploration and understanding of the story of you.

Mike Mulligan

Mike is a Principal Product Manager at Ancestry, based in our Dublin office. Mike has been doing on family history since he was young growing up in Donegal surrounded by generations of cousins.

58 Comments

  1. Robert Miller

    Thanks Mike. Good piece. I just tell them to read up on the history of Ireland, Scotland, Wales and Brittany.

  2. Sheila Cassidy

    I have 1% Italian Greek DNA results. I was able to look up my 3greatgrandmother in Scotland and found that she had an Italian last name and was also, Irish and came from Ireland .There are dark haired relatives (my Mom)among the redheaded Scots/Irish in my family!

  3. Jane Killeen

    Thanks, Mike ~ A friend just made a comment the other day about “How in the world can Ancestry know that a person is from a specific part of the world?” I was trying to explain the concept of a ‘reference panel of DNA’, but I didn’t have that phrasing until now. Thank you!

  4. Kerry Williams

    This confirmed what I already knew. For my mother her DNA is a little puzzling since she thought she was 50% German and 50% Swiss, but she found she is 61% Europe West, 22% Europe East, 3% Great Britain, 2% Ireland, 3% Iberian Peninsula and 3% Finland/Northwest Russia. We have no evidence to support the smaller percentage for the various Ethnic groups. My mother does have freckles.

  5. David

    Funny that I ran across this blog post first when I searched for the blog, as I also got a surprising 43% Ireland ethnicity. As a native of the southern US, almost every line I have (I have identified 56 of my 64 4th Great ancestors by now), I was expecting a heavy dose of Britain with Scandinavia and western Europe. I have been a genealogist for 31 years now, and based on what I’ve learned, a sponge for all British history I can find. I have so many lines that I can trace back to the isles (a smidge of Dutch, German and French) that while I knew there could be some surprises in the DNA matching, I felt I knew where the patterns would be. A great deal of my lineage is East Midlands and Yorkshire, but I knew that area had quite a bit of settlement and invasion (it was all in the Danelaw). This has been very helpful post, confirming some ideas I had and offering some new thoughts. Question – to what degree is it knowable about much impact the “Ireland” category has been influenced by 1) the Ulster plantations, and 2) the Old English (Norman) contribution of the 12th century? There may be no way to easily answer that, but I am curious as to your thoughts. Thanks!

  6. Margaret Faulkner

    My mum was a Williams I knew her father was came from Ireland and have traced living Williams relatives still in Mayo. I always thought Williams came from Wales.

  7. Steven McDonald

    My DNA says 81% Irish, most of my maternal side is from Ireland but further back my Paternal line came from Scotland.

  8. Brett Miller

    Im from Australia and although I havent uncovered any Irish links on my direct lines, my results came back with 55% Irish, next highest was 18% Scandinavian which was also a surprise.

  9. Mollie McHugh

    I just got my DNA results back 92% Irish, the rest 6% English, Scots and Irish. 1% Asian. I am 3 generation American. Hard to believe that my grandparents and parents haven’t had anything but Irish in their DNA. My generation has broken the lines!

  10. Nancy Cole

    my husband’s Dad was Irish,,red hair and blue eyes…..his Mom was Scottish….Black hair and dark brown eyes…..his coloring is his Mom’s , looks , he took after his Dad…….but looks just like his Dad…..he is 7 th Generation on his Dad’s Mother’s side. going back to Hans Herr of the Mennonites in Lancaster,Pa…and also on his Mom’s Mother’s side too.going back .. going back beyond the Revolutionary War in Tenn. and Alabama…I found all this out after we were married, He didn’t know anything about either family, as he was adopted @ 4 years old ….what a shame, he had such a great heritage, but never knew it….we made several trips back ther to meet his relatives, and see his Dad’s grave and also to put a large stone in the cemetery where his Mom is buried….I was only 16 when I married him, and he told me he had no one, because his adopted parents were murdered by her brother, I told him” everyone has someone, and we are going to find your family” .. that was back in 1949….and Thank God we did….with a pen and postage stamp……
    .

  11. Donna Dell

    My Irish line is of the dark-haired type; Dunn, meaning brown or dark. So does that mean our Irish heritage originated somewhere else?

  12. Chris Farrington

    My result came back as 21% (range 1-41%). This what I would have expected as my paternal grandfather had Irish parents.

  13. Ian McVey

    My Great Grandfather Charles McVey is down as Born in County Tyrone as was his Father Francis McVey….My Father Bill would often tell me they were Jacobites, Hence why the names Francis, Charles and Edward run in our Family….I have been trying for years to pinpoint where exactly they stayed in Ireland but to no avail !…..I new they were travelers right up to my Grandfather Francis he was the last to travel, so maybe by their occupation they moved freely between Scotland and Ireland, so in that case I would never really know exactly where we came from!!!!

  14. Martin

    Many have complained about the way that Ancestry are using Irish to describe a whole range of origins. I am half Welsh but according to Ancestry I am 64% Irish which is ridiculous.

    I know there are arguments about what ‘Celtic’ means but it would be a much better way of describing the mixture of British, Welsh, Scottish, Manx, Cornish, Breton and Irish. Even better would be trying to improve the analysis to give a more precise definition of it.

    It is obvious the Ethnicity part is just a marketing feature for the American customers but it would be nice if actually gave some useful information.

  15. Karen Bruton

    I was told the reason why my German ancestors don’t show up in my DNA is because it isn’t an old enough culture. But my question is, why wouldn’t it show up as Europe West?

  16. David

    I think Martin makes a good point above. Even with the knowledge that the “Celts” that make up the base of the isles DNA are more likely ‘up the coast’ from Spain/Portugal many centuries ago, I wonder if perhaps “Ireland” is not the best descriptor for this ethnicity? Not that I have a problem with Ireland. Celtic is problematic too given that the mDna that’s been found is not that close to the LaTene or Hallstatt celts people are most familiar with. “Celts of the Isles?”

  17. Kim Tout

    Thank you, that explains the 65% Irish in my mix and no Scottish, when I know that my paternal grandmother’s family came to Australia in the late 1800’s from Scotland. I knew there is some Irish from my mother’s maternal grandmother’s family and her paternal grandfather’s family are from Ireland. The 14% Scandinavia was a pleasant surprise, I was really chuffed to know I have Vikings in the mix.

  18. Lyn Hotchin

    I have a large percentage of DNA from Great Britain then Ireland and Scandinavia and Europe West. My surprise is a trace from the Caucasus and the Middle East. That interests me greatly!

  19. Cathy

    When I first received my DNA analysis, I had 48% British Isles, 22% Scandinavian, 18% Western European, and the rest was trace from regions of the Black Sea, across the Mediterranean, to the Iberian Peninsula (thinking traces of Celtic origins). Then months later, my results were updated to 50% British Isles, 23% Ireland, 18% Western European, and the remaining trace regions being the same. So this reinforced the idea of Celtic influence.

    I do know that my mother’s paternal line immigrated from Scotland. My father’s paternal line is also a common Scottish surname, but probably they came from the Ulster Plantation. I also believe my mother had an Anglo-Irish ancestor, also from the plantations. So after reading the above blog, I assume that my Ireland DNA match is better interpreted as being Celtic?

    I also have some known French ancestry, as well as Norman French ancestry, so it’s interesting that the Scandinavian went away entirely. But maybe it’s just “absorbed” in what is now labeled British Isles?

    I had hope the DNA results would have been better defined.

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Cathy: We’re only able to determine the 26 different regions that we include in the test and we create your genetic ethnicity estimate by comparing your DNA to the DNA of people in our reference panel. The AncestryDNA reference panel contains 3,000 DNA samples from people in 26 global regions which go back up to 10 generations. The test goes back 500-1000 years. We would also note that Ethnicity does not necessarily respect National boundaries so it is not possible in all cases to distinguish between certain countries (England, Scotland and Wales for example). If you click on the Great Britain region (or any other region) in your DNA results it will also show you more information here. We attached a link to an article here that explains more: http://ancstry.me/1On7OIu. We also have a number of helpful articles available from the DNA results page. These can be accessed by clicking on the question mark icon located in the top right of either of your results pages. There are 8 great articles here (on the ethnicity page). We hope you will find these helpful.

  20. Viola Ross

    I’ve had an interest in genealogy since I was a little girl and listened to my Spanish great-grandmother talk about her family. I just recently received my ethnicity report from AncestryDNA and was surprised to find I had Irish ancestry(21%). I had always believed that the surname Ferguson was Scottish(“son of Fergus”?) because the family story was that my paternal grandfather William Ferguson had come to America from England. That I could understand, but Ireland? After reading the comments and explanation, it seems more logical. Thank you.

  21. Paula

    I wondered about the 20% Irish that I had from my DNA results. As far as I knew, we had English heritage from my mother’s colonial American side. I even found a few Scottish people going way back in our line who were indentured servants in America. Most recently, my maternal grandmother’s grandfather was an immigrant from London, England and though I can’t prove it yet I suspect his wife from Canada (my GG grandmother) was of Irish descent (surname Brown).

  22. Catherine Quinn Laughner

    I would like to get my DNA TESTS DONE. I am supposed 95% Irish with the last 5% Scotch. Can U direct me as to where I can test my DNA. I Thank you in advance Catherine Quinn Laughner

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Catherine: Please visit this page to purchase and learn more about our DNA test, we hope you will be happy with your results! dna.ancestry.com

  23. Adrian Martyn

    David, its uncertain how many emigrated to Ireland during the ‘Norman’ conquest (1169-1260s) but that of the Tudor Conquest (1534-1603), and most especially the 17th century plantations, by 1701 came to form in or near a quarter of the total Irish population. Keep in mind that both sets experienced massive reverse emigration from the late 1200s into the early 1400s, and similarly massive Scots-Irish emigration from the 1680s to the 1850s. Factor into that massive Irish emigration to Iberia and France from the 1560s right into the mid-to-late 1700s (at which point emigrants slowly switched to north America, and Britain). Margaret, in County Mayo the surname Williams disguises Mac Uilliam, who were a Gaelicised branch of the Anglo-Norman de Burgh family. Martin, the only useful application of Celtic in Ireland is as a linguistic classification, as the native Irish never once described themselves as ‘Celts’, nor did they presume any shared ancestry with other ‘Celts’ such as the Welsh and Bretons, and only partially with the Scots. If anyone here wants to have ‘Celtic’ DNA, then they better hope they have French ancestry. The problem with several of these is that they have no idea of the history, and use Anglocentric terms which are unhistorical and deeply unhelpful. While Scandinavians, Normans, and various British had certainly impacted in Ireland, the base population of Ireland is … Irish (suprise!) and has been here in one shape or form long before the Celts (who were in France, not Ireland).

  24. Adrian Martyn

    David, its uncertain how many emigrated to Ireland during the ‘Norman’ conquest (1169-1260s) but that of the Tudor Conquest (1534-1603), and most especially the 17th century plantations, by 1701 came to form in or near a quarter of the total Irish population. Keep in mind that both sets experienced massive reverse emigration from the late 1200s into the early 1400s, and similarly massive Scots-Irish emigration from the 1680s to the 1850s. Factor into that massive Irish emigration to Iberia and France from the 1560s right into the mid-to-late 1700s (at which point emigrants slowly switched to north America, and Britain). Margaret, in County Mayo the surname Williams disguises Mac Uilliam, who were a Gaelicised branch of the Anglo-Norman de Burgh family. Martin, the only useful application of Celtic in Ireland is as a linguistic classification, as the native Irish never once described themselves as ‘Celts’, nor did they presume any shared ancestry with other ‘Celts’ such as the Welsh and Bretons, and only partially with the Scots. If anyone here wants to have ‘Celtic’ DNA, then they better hope they have French ancestry. The problem with several of these DNa sites is that they have no idea of the history, and use Anglocentric terms which are unhistorical and deeply unhelpful. Why not read a book on Irish history by Irish historians? While Scandinavians, Normans, and various British had certainly impacted in Ireland, the base population of Ireland is … Irish (suprise!) and has been here in one shape or form long before the Celts (who were in France, not Ireland).

  25. James Hopman

    I was surprised to see my results. 17% Irish, 10
    % British, 19% Scandinavian and the rest was Eastern and Western Europe. Only 2 of my great grandparents came from Ireland, the rest came from Holland, France, and various provinces of Germany. I suppose the Vikings could have gone into Holland, Pomerania, Posen, etc.

  26. I don’t understand , if there is so much iffiness about the Irish estimate and that is because there was so much movement between the countries of the British Isles, then why not just call the estimate ‘British Isles’ instead of differentiating between ‘Ireland’ and ‘Great Britain’ – that would cover everything in the island group of that name and probably be a more realistic and meaningful estimate and more readily understood. My own estimate of 35% Irish can only be explained by my high Lancastrian and Scottish Ancestry as I have no (legal !) native Irish ancestors back in 6 generations. I would also add that it has not been good PR for Ancestry DNA as friends and family are now reconsidering about having the test done as they feel that it is a lot of money to spend on something which gives results which, on the surface, are not very reliable.

  27. Sheila Perry

    I agree with the people who have posted about the misleading nature of the term ‘Irish’ in Ancestry DNA results. I feel this must be the strand that applies to the original inhabitants of the British Isles, I.e. before the various invasions by the Anglo-Saxons etc, so perhaps something like ‘Old British’ would be better. Personally my analysis has come back as 73% Irish, whereas my family tree is approximately 95% Scottish, with no Irish connection as far back as I’ve gone, and one ancestor from Norfolk in 1800. I feel that calling it Irish could easily lead family researchers to think they need to look for actual Irish ancestors instead of Scottish ones, thus making things more complicated than they need be.

  28. Karen Birkholm

    I’ve been working on my husband who we thought is 1/2 French and 1/4 Danish. ancestry DNA shows he is 70% Irish. I know one of his Great great grandfathers was born in Scotland and came to the US. I do not find anything else. How do you explain this?

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Karen: We create your genetic ethnicity estimate by comparing your DNA to the DNA of people in our reference panel. The AncestryDNA reference panel contains 3,000 DNA samples from people in 26 global regions which go back up to 10 generations. The test goes back 500-1000 years. We would also note that Ethnicity does not necessarily respect National boundaries so it is not possible in all cases to distinguish between certain countries (England, Scotland and Wales for example). If you click on the regions in your DNA results it will also show you more information here. We attached a link to an article here that explains more: http://ancstry.me/1On7OIu. We also have a number of helpful articles available from the DNA results page. These can be accessed by clicking on the question mark icon located in the top right of either of your results pages. There are 8 great articles here (on the ethnicity page). We hope you will find these helpful.

  29. Dorothy Cochran

    I am wondering as to how to go about researching my Irish heritage more. I can not find any info from where my ancestors are from in Ireland. Any advice would be greatly helpful.

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Dorothy: As there are no full Irish census records which exist prior to 1901, we need to be a bit more creative when researching Irish genealogy. There are a few collections on the website which tell us a bit more of the heads of households such as the Morpeth Roll (1841), the Ireland 1766 Religious Census, Griffith’s Valuation, 1847-1864 and Tithe Applotment Books, 1823-1837. Civil Registration for BMD in Ireland began in 1864. Before this date, you would need to rely more on parish records. Depending on the parish record, the record may be recorded in English or in Latin. So Christian names may be changed. Common changes would be along the lines of: James = Jacobus, Mary = Maria, Anne = Annam etc. If the birth certificate is before 1915 you may be able to find it via this website: http://www.irishgenealogy.ie/en/. If a birth date for one of your Irish relatives is after that you will need to contact this email address, gro@gro.ie. We’ve also attached a link to an article here with some search tips for Irish records: http://ancstry.me/2f0Lndw. Hope this helps and that you will find what you’re looking for.

  30. Fontaine Boutwell

    The verbal history can be documented by DNA testing. An example is my fraternal grandfather lived on the streets from age 4 when his mother died in child birth and his father abandoned him until age 7 when the police picked him up for not being in school. They placed him in a catholic orphanage but he was not allowed to live in the dorms because the priest felt he was Jewish. So he live in the infirmary with the jewish doctor. He said he had to earn his keep by taking care of the sick catholic boys, after class each day he went to work while the other boys played. He died thinking he was a jew. From DNA testing there is no jewish ancestry in our family.

  31. Christine

    I ‘m still very puzzled by my 40% Irish. I think so far I have identified one GGGGgrandmother who was Irish, there is a family tradition of being from Scotland but so far no traced relatives from there (at least 7 generations).
    However I do have a strong Cornish heritage, and I know there has been research showing people in Cornwall seem to have genetic differences from those in Devon although Ancestry groups have hem together as “southwest”. Could this explain it?

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Christine The Cornish line could well be behind this owing to the historical patterns of migration between Cornwall and Ireland.

  32. Shannon

    Hi there. I have documented Irish ancestors from Dublin, however, I did a DNA test and have no Irish, English or Scottish ancestry at all. It was mostly Scandinavian. Does this mean my Irish ancestors did not have deep roots in Ireland? They had very Irish sounding names. I am puzzled.

  33. Great insight Mike. For those of us “from away” it is often difficult to appreciate the amount of migration back and forth between say Ireland and Scotland. In North America we are accustomed to huge areas, wide open spaces. Consider the following, Ireland and Scotland could be squeezed (with a little disaggregationof the component pieces) into the State of North Dakota.

  34. Cheryl L Campbell

    I bought a DNA kit for my sister for Christmas at her request because she really has been getting into our heritage. Well, we now have a real mystery in our family her daughter also sent a kit in. My sister has opposite DNA from her daughter. Nothing fits. Now I feel this whole Web site is just a come on. My sister tried to call the company today to be cut off right as her turn was finally next…..TWICE! So the company apparently is just there to collect our money. Sad, sad, sad.

  35. Judy Bunt

    I have a DNA result of 23% Irish despite having no known Irish ancestors (most of my research goes many generations back) I have noted in discussions that this could be because of Welsh or Scottish ancestry. I have no Welsh and one line of Scottish on my maternal side. The puzzling thing for me is that my 94 year old mother’s DNA is only 10% Irish.
    I do however have some Cornish ancestry on my maternal side and a good deal more on my paternal side. I thought that this could be a possible reason for my surprising and inexplicable Irish result……however most of the (limited) reading I have done on this tells me that the Cornish are in fact quite a distinct group and not genetically similar to the Irish and Scottish. Very mysterious. Oh and kind of frustrating….

  36. Mark Kendall

    I think Ancestry overestimates Great Britain and underestimates Iberian.

    Our results on Ancestry are consistent with the results we have gotten on other services (which, in turn, are consistent with our paper trail) EXCEPT for over-estimating British and underestimating Iberian. By a lot.

    My grandmother, for example, her mother was Polish (and sure enough she shows up exactly 50% Eastern European). Her father was Mexican, and like on other services this is reflected by about 20% Native American DNA. The other 30% should be mostly Iberian (there’s some trace African and stuff thrown in there we know), but she’s showing up 13% Great Britain and only 11% Iberian on Ancestry’s test. This doesn’t make sense at all, compared to either known history OR to other company’s DNA tests (which conform to known history much better).

    My dad (her son) is even worse. His father was Irish mostly with a little bit of British, but my dad is showing up as 54% British and only 23% Irish…and no Iberian. I know that British and Irish gene pools overlap (though, somehow my own results seem to line up mostly correctly) so about half of the “British” can really be counted going towards the Irish. But that’s still like 20% British that he shouldn’t have and which probably is actually being read from Spanish/Iberian DNA.

    I know the gene pools might look vaguely similar as both regions had Celtic, Germanic, and Roman/Latin/Italic populations all mixed together…but somehow other companies have been a much better job of identifying the Spanish and not just defaulting towards an assumption of Britishness.

  37. Katherine Mian

    Like many others my Ancestry DNA results indicated nothing too surprising with the exception of 26 % of DNA Ireland. What does that really mean? Perhaps my Welsh ancestors and even my Chester and Lancashire ancestors drifted back and forth. The word Ireland presents a complex mix. Two distinct races exist in traditional Ireland and if someone thinks that the inhabitants did not wander back and forth across Europe and beyond that is a not to appreciated how well travelled were our ancestors. As well, the DNA we inherit has its beginnings in the beginnings of the modern human race and while I can trace my Welsh and Yorkshire ancestors back to the 1500s I am still at work digging away. My DNA results have allowed me to sit back and reflect and to explore the history of the various nations that make my DNA . My ancestry is 33 % Western Europe, Ireland, 22% Scandinavian, with a 12% from Britain , some Finn and Western Russian and a dash of East Europe. I believe that we need to see the DNA as a broad brush stoke of our essence. Enjoy the results and try to think back in time to the turbulent beginnings of our modern civilisation.

  38. Marie-A.

    My results seemed fairly accurate ( Iberian: yes my fathers’ father, grandfather, etc came from Bay of Biscay ) , Western Europe= yes, Burgundy amongst other regions but what is the ” label ” Irish means in all this? Celtic would be more appropriate in my case as I cannot see that my ancestors from my father or mother’s lineage would hail from Ireland. I am now in a dilemma instead of rejoicing at finding exciting new informations. I am rather disappointed at the fairly vague results overall .

  39. Colleen

    Mike, love your explanation of Irish ethnicity estimates.
    I understand that Ancestry will shortly be diving deeper into Irish ethnicity.
    My father is 100 % Irish, with his mother born in Mayo.
    His father’s side is questionable; some of his father’s history is murky due to an adoption so we did yDNA testing, only to find that his yDNA haplogroup matches are all from Scotland.
    We’re thinking of an Ulster-Scots connnection to Donegal or Ulster in general.

    So, while my father is agast at the idea that he is Ulster-Scots (which, to him, means Protestant not Catholic) we will let DNA speak for itself.

    Looking forward to the deeper dive analysis when it is released next week.

    I’m Irish on my mother’s side as well and know the locations in Roscommon and Carlow that they came from.
    So I sure hope the location results agree with what I have on my tree!

    Colleen

  40. Letitia

    I would love to know just how much Irish I am, along with British and the 1.7% Nepali and the 1.1% South Asian?

  41. Letitia

    I would love to know exactly how much Irish I have and also British, 1.7% Nepali and the 1.1% South Asian?

  42. Robert Carniaux

    We just received our DNA results and are extremely disappointed and frustrated with your “Irish” ethnicity category terminology. To lump the Scots, Welsh, etc. into a category labeled Irish is ethnically insensitive and downright misleading. I’m sure the French would just love being in an ethnic category called “Belgian”! I’d like to get a refund on our DNA tests and I’m considering terminating my Ancestry subscription at renewal next month!

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