Posted by Anna Swayne on October 5, 2016 in AncestryDNA, Family History Month

Do rebels run in your family? Is there a gene to detect that? Not quite, but below are 4 of the many things you can find out from the AncestryDNA test, and who knows you may just find a rebel ancestor.

  1. You have a cousin in IrelandIrish Flag

Eli grew up saying he was Irish, but he never knew what part of the country his family was from. Recently he got a new AncestryDNA cousin match from someone in Northern Ireland who also took the AncestryDNA test. Now Eli and his newly matched cousin have connected to share stories of why one family left and another stayed. It’s a connection they may never have made without DNA. (AncestryDNA is now available in 39 different countries).

  1. The answer to a 100-year-old family mystery

Gloria was from Honduras and family legend said her great-grandfather was an American who was shot by his brother and buried in Honduras.

Can DNA help her answer this question? AncestryDNA compares your test to other people who have taken the test, and if those other people have an online family tree, we look for ancestors you might share.

Gloria got a DNA hint suggesting she could be related to Joseph Good, who was born in Virginia in the late 1700s. She’d never heard of him, but with a little digging, she discovered that Joseph was her 4x great-grandfather and the grandfather to her mysterious great-grandfather who was shot. The legend proved true, with the help of AncestryDNA.

  1. How different you and your siblings really are

Anna couldn’t believe she was more British than her three sisters, even though they all have the same parents.

How can two siblings have ethnicity estimates that don’t match?

The DNA we inherit from each parent is completely random, so unless you’re an identical twin, your DNA profile won’t be exactly the same as a sibling’s. That’s why getting more people in your family tested helps you get a more complete picture of your past and what world regions are included in your family’s DNA.

  1. You have family living next door

neighbor_nextdoorAfter looking at her DNA test results, Susan recognized a name she was connected to: it was the name of her neighbor of 20 years. They never knew they were second cousins. Small world, isn’t it?

Wondering what AncestryDNA will reveal about you and your family? There’s one way to find out. Discover more at AncestryDNA.com

 

 

Anna Swayne

Anna Swayne has 9 years of experience in the DNA genealogy world. At Ancestry, she leads efforts in developing education to help our community maximize their experience with AncestryDNA. She believes there is real power behind DNA and the story it can unlock for each of us. When she is not talking DNA you can find her hiking or cycling in the mountains or cooking at home.

179 Comments

  1. Ellen Trainor

    My DNA test showed not one drop of German from my mother’s side. It’s amazing! I’m begging my two brothers to take the test. I never knew I was Scandinavian until I took the test!

  2. Cyndye Batchelor

    So far, all my ancestors touched America by the late 1700’s and most of them earlier. Imagine my surprise when a 3rd cousin pops up born and bred in Scotland. Totally impossible for us to be that closely related, but points out how much of the Scottish and Irish genes I got in the segment lottery.

  3. Maryann Ciabattari

    If you are not testing in Italy, how is this country included as an ethnic result in your test?

  4. Christine Rakoczy

    I was wondering if I do this will it show where my Great Grandmother who was full blooded Chactaw( sp?) Where all of her records are. Will it show birth and marriage records? Chactaw blood line never ends and we as a family (big one) have Neve gotten to be able to use those benefits through that blood line. If this is something we can use to show our blood line I woukd be all for this. If not then I wouldn’t want to waste my money because we have done a family tree before and got great results but not from the Great Grandmother.

  5. Dolores

    Ellen, it’s those Vikings. They left their seed throughout Britain and Germany. I had the same eye-opening experience.

  6. Joanne

    I am 53 and have no idea what I am. My father wouldn’t ever tell me. My mom said I was Heinz 57.
    That was so unfair. Im looking forward to my results.

  7. Al Doyne

    Ancestry recently broke down one of my major brick walls, proving a connection to the family of my 2nd great-grandfather who I only knew by his initials. Thank you very much for that!

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Al we’re really glad to hear you’ve made progress with your research, thanks so much for sharing that with us!

  8. Laura

    I took the Ancestry DNA Test because my Dad died in a military air crash before I was 2. My Mom was vague regarding his nationality. We’ve always known my Moms background and have a full family tree going back to the 1400’s. Imagine my surprise when my test came back 42% Irish. My Mom said it was wrong LOL. I told her no. You married an Irishman and didn’t even know it. Thank you Ancestry! This explains a lot!

  9. Barb

    I was highly disappointed in the DNA testing from Ancestry. I got it for my daughter to find out more on her heritage from her father’s fathers side of the family since we don’t know anything about him except he was definitely a Latino of some descent. However, her great grandmother was full blooded Cherokee. Her DNA results say she is 83% Irish and 7% Native American. This is not a correct analysis. For one thing, it doesn’t look like they test all markers. Why is that? I am very not satisfied with our findings.

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      Hi @Barb, we’re very sorry to hear you were disappointed with the AncestryDNA test results that your daughter received. To help you better understand the results we have included a link below which will go into greater detail for you. We really hope that helps! http://ancstry.me/2c5HmV6

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @John we advise a time frame of between 6-8 weeks after they’ve reached the lab for the test results be available, we apologise for any frustration this delay may cause.

  10. Rose Ann

    I had my DNA done to determine whether I may have a French ancestor, but you say you have grouped together French & German, & 6 other countries, calling them Western European. When are you going to be able to at least differentiate between the French & German?

  11. Barb

    Another problem was on my Mother’s side of the family is both German and French. My daughter’s results showed not even a trace of these two origins.

  12. Michael Boyd

    I did the DNA mail in months ago and heard nothing back yet and I can’t get your support site up to my inquiry into my results of DNA test could you please respond Thanks Michael

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Michael sorry to hear you’ve not heard back from us regarding your DNA test. We do think it would be best for you to call us on 0800 404 9723, once our support team have confirmed the details of your account they would be happy to help you from there. Thanks.

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Michael sorry to hear you’ve not heard from us regarding your AncestryDNA test. We do think it would be best for you to give us a call on 0800 404 9723, once one our support team have confirmed the details of your account they would be happy to help you. Thanks.

  13. edv10

    It took a couple of years, but I finally was able to connect with my mother’s birth family. She was adopted after her mother passed in 1926. She was raised an only child by a single Mom. I know she would be amazed that she had 10 aunts and uncles and dozens of cousins. Thanks Ancestry DNA! We have some answers but so many more questions.

  14. Mandy Rooker

    I have two brothers from my father Micheal Dowell Martinez I have never met.O would like you to help me find them and connect.

  15. Mandy Rooker

    I have two brothers from my father Micheal Dowell Martinez I have never met.I would like you to help me find them and connect.

  16. Richard Famiglietti

    I bought ancestry DNA sent in my kit 4 times. Each time it came back as inconclusive (I must be an alien) so I asked for a refund when they asked me to test for the 5th time. I figured if I couldn’t get a valid result after 4 tries, what would 1 more matter. They refunded me 50% so if you get results like mine, don’t ask for a refund as you will get screwed for 50% of what you paid. Oh, by the way I cancelled my monthly subscription when they took my money!

  17. joanne tansey

    I wondered if I could obtain specific data on region from the DNA test. What area of Italy or Ireland were my ancestors originally is what I’d like.

  18. Richard Watts

    First I did my family tree… this is very time consuming process, especially 15 years ago when I started it. It’s easier now. There were many surprises and I found my knowledge of History helped me understand the significance of the things l learned. Then with all that understanding, I did the DNA testing and it confirmed my research. You can’t trust family stories, you can’t assume the surnames of your parents is enough to zero in on your ethnicity. It’s not particularly easy but if you have the time it’s worth it, at least it was me.

  19. Sue Shaw

    Joanne (from Oct 8), my mom told me the same thing about the Heinz 57! I think it’s because they are hiding something. I am proud of my heritage no matter what it is!

  20. Lynda Farley

    My brother and I took the DATes from Ancestry and it showed him 52% Irish and me at 56%. I have done extensive research that shows only three distant Irish relatives and the (many) remaining from the UK. Most research goes back to the late 1500s. How is this possible?

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Nancy, sorry for any delay with your AncestryDNA test results. We advise a time frame of between 6-8 weeks from the time the kit reaches the lab for your results to be available for you. If it you feel it is beyond that point please give us a call on 0800 404 9723, one of our support team would be happy to look into that for you.

  21. Nick Pugliese

    The following question begs to be answered for me before I do anything….
    Maryann Ciabattari

    · October 6, 2016 at 8:04 am

    If you are not testing in Italy, how is this country included as an ethnic result in your test?

  22. Rebecca Campbell

    I ran across a quote the other day, I don’t remember who said it, but it read like this, “There is some salvation in knowing where you came from”. And I fully understand that statement. I was adopted at birth. I have been on a number of registries for several years to no avail and had what little info the adoption agency was able to give me, which wasn’t much, so, I did the DNA to at least know ethnic background, never expecting to get a match. After a few months, however, I got an almost perfect 2nd cousin hit, which led to finding my birth father. He has passed 38 yrs ago, but I have two 1/2 brothers and a 1/2 sister as well as a lot of other kin. I am so thankful to God for allowing me to find them and to Ancestry.com for offering this service. After 58 yrs of life and over 20 yrs of searching, I now know who I am and where I came from. I cannot even begin to explain the feeling of having a family that actually wants me to be a part of it.

  23. Mary Hopkins

    I have my mothers 75 yrs of family tree, my grandfather is Osage Indian on my dads side. when my DNA came back, nothing matches my dads side, only my moms …does this mean she cheated? i”m having my cousin do a test as he is my dads nephew and if we don’t match, my mom has some explaining to do…LOL should be interesting, but would certainly explain a lot of things that happened in my childhood. Anxious to find out. btw, I had zero american Indian on my DNA and people that are my DNA related cousins are of surnames that are NOT in my mothers genealogy. she has gone back to 1600’s and these names are not there…another mystery i hope to solve with my cousins DNA we’ll see……

  24. Mary Bowen

    There is a rumor that my father was descended from spanish Jews who fled to Italy and then moved to france, married Protestants, and came to NC. Can a DNA test confirm this fact for me?

  25. Carol Mullin

    I just wanted to add my Amen to Rebecca Campbell. I also was adopted at birth. When I was in my 50s I found my mother’s family through my adoption papers but father was a total mystery. This past year, just before turning 70, I submitted my DNA to Ancestry and immediately found a lady who turned out to be my half sister. Through her I have learned who my father was (already passed) and I have acquired a whole second family. Several other first- and second-cousin connections popped up too. It is amazing how fulfilling it is to know where I came from and who my family members were and are. Talk about an item to check off the bucket list!

  26. JERRY BARNISH

    This is an amazing journey. I just received the results and completely surprised at the donations of DNA are and from where. This explains why as siblings we are different but of the same family. My and two of my siblings features represent a trace region and not of the land of our paternal or maternal names! One sibling looks the same a collateral Cousin of our paternal line. As much as this testing answers it opens the door for many more questions. Also road trips. And study of ancestral language. So off to the islands. The Ionian islands during our winter. Opa!

  27. Gail Patrick

    I am also an adoptee who was looking for my birth family. Thanks to Illinois opening birth records for us older people I was able to find my birth mother and large family on Ancestry public trees within two hours. Thank you Ancestry, a thirty year search ended on one side of my tree. Now the search for my birth father is in progress since I did my DNA.

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Gail: We’re very happy to hear that you were able to find your birth mother and the family on her side. Thank you for sharing this with us and we hope that you will be able to find what you’re looking for Gail.

  28. Shari Forst

    I found my results pretty interesting I am 96% European Jewish which I figured but I have always been taken for Italian and Spanish and sure enough my results had trace regions from Italy and the Iberian Peninsula. I found a third cousin who has a lot of relatives from Italy. My parents were shocked lol

  29. Kristy

    Barb you don’t seem to understand that not all genes are passed down from our ancestors. If you have multiple children they likely will get different genes from different ancestors. The fact that your daughter’s results aren’t what you “expected” doesn’t mean that they are incorrect results.
    Christine Rakoczy you are not thinking big enough. You may have done a family tree a few generations back, but that is just scratching the surface! You wont be “wasting” your money giving this a try. If you wait until November when they have their sale, what is there to lose?
    And a few people have asked about Italy. Your test results will tell you if you have Italian blood. (My husband’s came back with traces of Italian). I think what they may mean is that they dont send kits to Italy??
    I am excited to order my kit next month! I want to get one for each of my 3 children and for my grandpa and his 2 brothers:) Just to start with, especially my grandpa/great uncles as they are the oldest living relatives on my mom’s side. Too bad my dad is the oldest on his side still living…

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Loren: Please visit this link for more information about our DNA test and for purchasing this: dna.ancestry.com

  30. Donald Breland

    I had both an ancestry DNA and a Family Tree 37Marker DNA test, the results reviled that I am about 6% Scandinavian, about 48% English, Welch and Scottish, and 1% Irish, 6% German, 6.5 % French, 6.5% Spanish, Basque and Portuges, 3% Flemish, 1% Sami, 11.5% Hungarian, Romanian, Russian, Turkish, and other Eastern European mix, plus about 6.5 % Middle Easter, and about .7% Native American, and of that mix is about 3.5% Asknazie and Saphardic Jewish. It was long past down threw the family that we were what they termed Hazins 57 or of undetermined origan, with some Native American, or so it was said. I have now found that my family can be classified a Melungon. About half of my famil appear to be Scandinavian or German, the other half appear to be Mexican or Middle Eastern, some times, two children with the same father and mother, in my family line will show this difference. Also some family member, in their 60s and 80s will have dark hair and look more Spanish or Middle Easter , as the get older, even though some of those same people , had blond Germanic features, as young children. I also have cousins of Asian and African/American descent, whom I not yet met. There is also a 2% difference between me and first cousin, on my father’s side of my family, which I understand is normal.

  31. Diane Bryant

    I finally found my bio dad after taking this test (matched a half-sister). I can’t tell you how surreal it was receiving his photo and seeing my own eyes on someone else’s face. This was the best $99 I ever spent.

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Diane: Thank you for sharing this with us, we’re very happy for you and we wish you the best of luck with everything! 🙂

  32. Terrylyn Abbott

    If it wasn’t for Ancestry DNA I’d probably never have found my paternal grandmother’s side of the family which represents a country we were always told was part of us, but because she died when my father was very young, he never had much information on her side of the family!

  33. Paul Bayda

    There not anything there that my father was born in Belarus, near Minsk & Pinsk he also served in the Polish Army when he was 17,and was wounded? There is also cities named Bayda??

  34. Jerry GaMarsh

    While the comments were interesting, I would like to know how much personal info is required from the testing facility and how secure is that info?

  35. Debra Joyce Fox

    Mary Hopkins….I had the same problem with my DNA test. Only my father’s side showed up. I contacted ancestry a couple of times and was told I just had more of my father’s genes. I knew something was wrong and tried calling ancestry one more time and talked to a very helpful lady who informed me it was linked to my father, not me. Make sure you are the person the dna test is linked. On the positive, it gave me time to research and just focus on my paternal side. It took about 2 months to get mom’s dna connection but it showed up.

  36. Audrey Van Der Horn

    I have had a boner marrow donation 14 years ago. I wonder if this treatment will change my DNA.

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Audrey: Yes, this will change the results of your DNA results. Since that persons bone marrow would make their DNA to be included in your results then this might show incorrect matches and relationships.

  37. Patty

    Donald, is there any difference in the Ancestry DNA test and the Family Tree 37? And Joann, on the Heinz 57, I was told that as well, and I guess we are all pretty much a big mix. Going back as far as we can, our ancestors came from all places it seems. Heinz 57 I am, born and bred. 😉

  38. CC

    My tree was rendered almost null when I found out through DNA that my father is not my father, nor is he the father of my brother. My father doesn’t even know that yet. In addition, I found out the people that adopted my mother were actually blood relations to me. They never breathed a word of that to anyone. Now, I have a lot of sleuthing to do to find out what the real history of my family is; the part that no one spoke of and kept secret.

  39. Kathy Brown

    I am really confused at my DNA results. It showed that I was of eastern European descent, Irish and no German or native American. My father’s family name was Weger which is German and my mom’s dad was 3/4 Cherokee Indian, last name Starnes and his mother full blood Cherokee was a Bookout. My DNA says that to all be false. I’m really concerned about the accuracy of your testing and would like to be retested…if I come out the same again I will gladly pay for the testing, however, if my German and native Cherokee lines come through, I don’t expect to have to pay again. I realize that perhaps you don’t have enough DNA in your limited data base, and I’ve read other post where there is a issue with Native American DNA testing not being detected.

    Will you please resend another test kit.
    Kathy Weger Brown
    1222 West Line Road
    Whitesboro, Texas 76273

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Kathy: The DNA test can show if you inherited the markers for Native American. But you do not inherit every trait or marker from your Ancestors so even if you are a direct descendant it might not show up in your DNA test. The results do not provide a specific tribal affiliation, however. Please see the following articles that explains more about this: http://ancstry.me/23Yktn5 and http://ancstry.me/1Yrotvv. The AncestryDNA reference panel contains 3,000 DNA samples from people in 26 global regions which go back up to 10 generations. The test goes back 500-1000 years. We attached a link to an article here that explains more: http://ancstry.me/1On7OIu. We also have a number of helpful articles available from the DNA results page. These can be accessed by clicking on the question mark icon located in the top right of either of your results pages. There are 8 great articles here (on the ethnicity page). We hope you will find these helpful.

  40. Jennifer CASTILLe

    I am looking to fine my biological father I was born to Elizabeth Castille and Regional Porter. My mother and he was never married. They had a daughter and left me. I was born in the 50th in opelousas, Louisiana. I would like for some to help with the with the search. For him for some reason I can not find out there he was born. Even though I have a aunt that know him but she rr refused to tell me where he is or where his family reside.my mother passed at in early 1993. And she got married to some eles.So know that I maybe to old of a person to stir be look for him but I am still. Curious to know who he is.

  41. Carol Law

    8 greatgrandparents and one grandfather from Counties Cork and Kerry, Ireland, came to America during the Irish Famine, all finally settling together on Hurley Mountain, located in Greenbrier, Summit and Fayette Cties in SE WVa. Even with a trip to Ireland and a decade of research in the 1990s by my now deceased brother, finding anything about our many Irish cousins or our ancestors’ early life in Ireland has been an unproductive enterprise. I’m new to Ancestry and don’t have a lot of time to spend on it. But I find the references you provide have not helped me, as to births, marriages, etc. of those who immigrated to the U.S.

  42. Colin

    My wife and I have both had DNA tests done and both have had plenty of hits. Mostly very distant but my wife has had a few 2nd. – 4th. cousins which have helped prove my research. I had suspicions that a distant branch of my family had moved from England to Australia. I got a message from a previously unknown 5th. cousin who lives in Australia confirming my suspicions and giving me more family to add to my tree.

  43. Jim W

    After reading some of the above comments the kindest thing I can say is that if you dont have a grasp of European History there is a good chance you wont understand or “agree” with your results. Also, I wish I has a dime for every person that believed they had Native American ancestry. LOL

  44. Joey S

    I ran into a deadend right away. Can’t find any info on any of my grandparents. There seems to be no records of my maternal grandparents or my paternal grandmother. What do I do?

  45. Susan

    Oh Jim, amen. For some crazy reason people aren’t comprehending that our ancestors had totally different “borders” than what we have. War and opportunity both have been causing people to move around for hundreds of years. Maybe your family was in Ireland but for only a generation or two, and maybe those Italian grandparents were only the second generation and their parents came from what is now Austria, who knows? I’m seeing an awful lot of silly in these comments.

  46. Carole Curtis

    A few years ago I had my DNA analyzed by Ancestry.com. It was very interesting, but I was a little confused on 81% Italy/ Greece. Why is that since all four grandparents came from different part of Italy? It would be nice to be able to break the 81% down into how much Italian and how much Greek. Can this be done? Please comment.

  47. Fontaine Boutwell

    I joined the Fontaine/Maury Society last year as I am a direct descendent of Mathew Fontaine Maury and inherited a teste bed from my grandmother, Ruby Fontaine Gulliam Pettus. I love the bed and sleep on it nightly but I have always felt there might be someone else who should have the bed because I never knew who General Walter Scott Fontaine, the original owner of the bed was in relationship to me or my grandmother. I posted my story on the Fontaine/Maury Society website and received a response from a women who said she was a great great granddaughter of General WS Fontaine. There was a reunion the weekend that hurricane Matthew hit Florida so I was unable to attend that meeting in Virginia. The weather was on my side…during that storm I set up my family tree and I am a great great grand daughter of the General and I am keeping the bed. From researching his background he was a Virginia farmer with many slaves. They are listed by sex, color, age but no names. Shocking but not so long ago.

  48. Laurie

    My great great great grandmother was a full blooded Native American but my DNA shows no Native American. How does that work?

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Laurie: The DNA test can show if you inherited the markers for Native American. But you do not inherit every trait or marker from your Ancestors so even if you are a direct descendant it might not show up in your DNA test. The results do not provide a specific tribal affiliation, however. Please see the following articles that explains more about this: http://ancstry.me/23Yktn5 and http://ancstry.me/1Yrotvv.

  49. Marvin

    I was able to discover who my biological father was by being connected to his sister. His sister, my aunt, submitted DNA to ancestry back in 2013. I submitted in October of 2015. By December of 2015 I had discovered who my biological father is.

  50. Bruce

    How can I
    “contact customer service”
    when there is “NO CUSTOMER SERVICE”?
    Does anyone have a direct contact or phone number to customer service?
    This is very discouraging!!!

  51. Marie Myers

    I was not surprised that my DNA showed 95% Eastern Europe, since all 4 grandparents were from Poland. Is it ususual to be soooo concentrated?

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Troy: Please follow this link in order to find more information and purchase our DNA test, dna.ancestry.com

  52. David hammond

    I would like to everything about my family history would some one call me and can u make payments

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @David: We’ve edited your post and removed your phone number to protect your privacy. Although we don’t do the research for you we do have the tools for you to research your family history. We recommend that you start with yourself and build your tree from there if you haven’t already done so. The attached article will go over some great steps: http://ancstry.me/29A77se. We’ve also attached a link to another article that we hope will be helpful: http://ancstry.me/29ywn2X. If you would like professional help with your research you can visit the ProGenealogists website here: https://www.progenealogists.com/.

  53. Janet

    I am a blonde haired, blue eyed, fair-skinned person who has to stay out of the sun for fear of burning. My DNA results showed that I am 25% Scandnavian, 71% British Isles, 3% Nigerian and 1% Mali. I would have never known about my African ancestors, had I not had DNA Test done. Looking in the mirror, I would have never guessed I have black african ancestry 🙂

  54. S Johnson

    I told a friend from Russia that I am descended from Pocohantas. He thought this was hilarious as he believed that Pocohantas was just a cartoon character. She didn’t show up in my DNA test, but that’s OK, I don’t need my money back.

  55. Laura

    Everyone in my immediate family did this, and we also did familytreedna.com dna tests. Both my sons are adopted from a foreign country. For one of my sons, the results were exactly the same at the two companies. For the other son and for my spouse and I, the results were pretty different between the two companies. It is interesting to see this, and I assume that, for example, one has more British and the other more Scandinavian, because one of them goes back farther and picks up the Viking invaders of Britain, and the other just calls them British. But I don’t know. Also, my spouse is blond and blue-eyed and has 1% West African, but we actually expected that, because we had found through traditional research the gggrandfather in the line who was born a slave to a plantation owner father and slave mother, and who passed as white all his life. In this case, the dna totally supported the research.

  56. Marguerite Ferra

    I love Ancestry.com. My DNA test results have connected me to many unknown cousins–we are now in contact. Many amazing and interesting surprises. My husband from Cuba (DNA — Africa, Asia, Europe, Native American) and I from the USA (DNA — mostly Great Britain, Ireland, Germany, France, Scandinavia) have two very distant cousins in common. Small world.

  57. Molly Staub

    Shari Forst: My son tested 88% Eastern European Jewish and 2-4% North African and Iberian Peninsula. I learned at the Jewish Genealogical Society that an ancestor had probably married a Sephardic Jew. Try jewishgendis.org – it’s free.

  58. Mary J. Walker

    My DNA came back pretty much as expected except, you guessed it – DNA didn’t reflect any Native American (Cherokee), my Mother’s father’s mother. Doesn’t matter. BUT, I love Ancestry.com. Because of doing my DNA at the urging of my first cousin’s daughter, we found another first cousin’s daughter in UK (another daughter and son). I was thrilled! THEN found another first cousin here in USA. Again, I was thrilled. These 2 first cousins were born during WWII and are the children of an Uncle. Then through DNA I found the DNA connection to my father’s father line. Tickled PINK!. Also, through extensive research by my first cousin 1x removed, we found our Grandmother’s father’s family who we had not been able to find. Long stories – but all fits. My cousin in UK and I Skype and even though she is a younger generation, we have found a very real connection. Ancestry has brought all of us together. A distant cousin from my father’s line found me. She was born in Viet Nam and was looking for her birth father (my distant cousin that I didn’t know) and she found his family, but that is her story. Have found so many other cousins that I have been in contact with -unbelieveable. I am not alone.

  59. Tracy

    Can’t Ancestry DNA do something to narrow down the nationality and possible family members of Jonbenet Ramsey’s killer?

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Glen: Once the lab starts processing your test, please allow 6-8 weeks before you receive your results. You can see if the lab started processing your test if you log in to your account and click on the DNA tab.

  60. Donald

    Tracy, there is no possible way to break DNA down to nationality. DNA is more regional than anything else. The only way to break it down to a nationality is to not be lazy and do a family tree and trace your lineages back. DNA tests can’t tell you everything.
    Laurie- Likely your Great Grandmother was 0% Native American and you were told a legend like most others who find the same.
    People please learn to DNA it’s not hard they have plenty of help links on the DNA results pages..

  61. Lisa

    The people posting their personal phone numbers and addresses should either delete or edit them. That is just asking for crazies to contact you.

  62. Larry G. Wineland

    After having already done the family tree and then the DNA, it was amazing to see that the individuals who inhabit the tree mimic the ethnic background of the report: 27% Irish, 21% Western Europe, 19% Great Britain, 14% Scandinavian, 11% Italy/Greece, 6% Eastern European , and 2% Middle East. Surnames of members of the family tree have names from the areas listed above. Family lore had said that both parts of the family had American Indian. DNA proved that wrong, and I had no written proof. Good work Ancestry for helping me populate a Family Tree of over 4,000.

  63. Brenda Nichols

    I mailed in my test last year and never received my test results. Would like to know what the outcome.

  64. Stephanie

    I found the test to be very helpful in finding relatives, however I have found the ancestry testing for Native American DNA to be totally inadequate. My great grandmother was Native American and not a drop shows up.

  65. Margaret Griffin

    My maiden name is Downey and naturally I felt that I should research my Irish ancestors. My DNA showed I was only 6% Irish and 79% British and remainder Western Europe. Certainly I was disappointed but learned where my Irish descent originated (paternal 5th great grandfather) and British ancestry originated(maternal 7th great grandmother). Problem is finding when and where they arrived in the U.S. Families on both sides were way way too large with approx. 15 children in a lot of the families. Daughter is getting a DNA kit for her birthday.

  66. Marguerite Illing

    My fathers maternal grandmother was supposed to be a full blooded Cherokee with the last name of Hicks, as a bride she was taken back to Wales. If I do this DNA test can I trace this line?

  67. Nancy Gray

    I did the DNA test because I was adopted 51 years ago with no knowledge of my birth family except that my parents had both been 17 at the time and my mother was English with some Jewish ancestors. I was connected to a “2nd cousin” (she was 92 and after consulting the list of predicted relationships I settled on Great Great Aunt, which was correct.) I sifted through her 15 siblings, searching down their lines for a male born in 1947 (since this match had no Jewish heritage, it was my father’s side) and FOUND HIM! I contacted my birth father and he gave me the name of my birth mother. I am meeting her this Saturday!!!! I also have half siblings, some of whom I have already met. This has been a wonderful experience for me and opened the door to having lifelong questions answered.

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @bj: Please follow this link for more information about our DNA test and the price of this: dna.ancestry.com.

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Sheila: The DNA test can show if you inherited the markers for Native American. But you do not inherit every trait or marker from your Ancestors so even if you are a direct descendant it might not show up in your DNA test. The results do not provide a specific tribal affiliation, however. Please see the following articles that explains more about this: http://ancstry.me/23Yktn5 and http://ancstry.me/1Yrotvv.

  68. Darla Jenkins

    I paid for my mom a DNA test & now don’t know how to get the results of hers. How do I find it? Thank you for all your help! 😀

  69. David Schaffter

    I took the DNA test and found out who my mother’s father might be, since my mother’s mom died at childbirth and the father was unknown. Turns out my mother’s father was married to someone else during the time-frame of conception and birth of my mother. The family of my unknown grandfather (Who I now know), also joined Ancestry.com and had their DNA test done. This triggered a DNA match to a shared grandfather with me and the other family. I wrote them a letter through Ancestry.com explaining all this, but have never heard from them. It might be a touchy subject, but I wonder how I can get them to respond that we share the same grandfather.

  70. Brenda Lubben

    There was always talk in our family that my gggrandmother was full blooded Cherokee. Through the times the story was told that she lied about her linage due to the fact that she married a white man and that was not a good situation for a full blooded Cherokee woman. She claimed she was 1/6″. My DNA has proved that family gossip was just that, gossip. If she was full blooded I would have had more than the <1% in me. Am I disappointed? Yes and no, just glad to know that truth!

  71. Diane O'Brien

    I was told for many years I was Choctaw Indian and my uncle send me (From ancestry.com) a huge file of info tracking our family’s where about way back and it shows a lot of information and proof that we are choctaw Indian. Why doesn’t it show when I had the DNA done? It showed I have no Indian and I know my grandfather mother is indusn. Please help to why this is the case.

  72. Frances Edwards

    I have read many of the comments. I have been told that DNA testing will have to be tested from a male in the family; the DNA on a female will only trace the mother’s side of the family. I have done quite a bit of Ancestry Search on my family tree, and have found that from both sides of my parents came from many different places. Since I am a female would the DNA also give me my father’s background. My Brother had his DNA done by GENO and it did not give us much information. Would Ancestry DNA tell us more?

  73. James Call Dail III

    James (Call) Walter Dail died at 2 years of age. When my dad was born latter they named him James Call Dail He changed it to James Call Dail Jr. and me the 3rd. Change your record to show the Change.

  74. Mari

    Some people are critical that Ancestry can’t get as specific as they want with their DNA. I found it helpful to go to the library in the children’s section (because I did not want to read a huge book) and get a book on a country that shows a larger percentage in your DNA test. My DNA is focused in the UK but has lesser possible percentages throughout parts of Europe. By reading a book about the UK, I am now aware of the different invaders in the UK. Romans, Celts (southern and central France), Germanic tribes (Germany and Denmark) and later the Spanish. Many other countries borders have changed over the years and have been invaded by other peoples as well. You can look online too but I love the straightforward explanation in the young adults part of the library. Short and easy to understand. This will possibly give you some insight into the complexity of DNA. It is not as simple as taking the modern map of the world and taking a test and there you go-you are French. Even if my ancestors only lived in the UK, which is highly likely, they are somehow related to others in Europe. We are part of a family of humans that migrated, invaded, governed around the globe.

  75. Richard Hopkins

    Strange for sure. My wife has more Irish in her DNA then I do, and my Great Grandfather was born in Ireland and hers in Hungary. Go figure…lol

  76. SAndra Breemes

    I have found out through the dna test that I am 20% Jewish and have a lot of second and third cousins. I just wish there was a way to find out which side of my family it is on.

  77. Dorothy Tidwell Sullivan

    I was very disappointed that the DNA results only showed my mother’s family DNA instead of my father’s DNA. The results you sent fit my mother’s family and I appreciate knowing about their Western European and Irish roots . But my native American ancestors come from my father who died years ago and I don’t have a brother. I have Native American ancestry from 2 grandmothers and a grandfather, a great grandmother, a great great grandfather and his father was full blood Cherokee (from birth records and Dawes rolls). I understand that I cant learn my dad’s DNA because I am female ! I didn’t know that before I did the test. My Cherokee heritage is very precious to me and I have always known in my heart and my soul that my native heritage is a big part of who I am. I am a Cherokee master artist and have spent the last 30 years helping to preserve our history, culture, and heritage through my paintings. I have always been an artist (portraits, landscape, western art) but my dad came to me in a dream showing me a scene of the Trail of Tears and I painted it and the same thing happened for 7 years in a row. I realized the purpose for my art work. Don’t need DNA for that. .

  78. Tom McCready

    All Ancestry Users should share their tree with the rest of the members. There are many
    users out there who are adopted and have no idea where they came from; lets help them
    find their roots. I have found family separated by 150 years and 3000 miles. And no foreign
    princes ‘wanting me to help them regain their money’,, Ha Ha… Use your matches and
    make contact if possible; your DNA matches might have information and photo’s , stories
    that your parents and grandparents never passed.

  79. Ann Milligan

    My ancestry is from Scotland, England and Germany. My DNA testing showed a large percentage Danish. Family stories are that one set of German ancestors left Germany in the 1700’s for Denmark. Interesting!!!

  80. Irene Zayas

    When you give no information on the Taino Indian from Puerto Rico does this mean that you have no blood test of them. How can this be and yet you have lots information of the slaves that were in Puerto Rico?

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Robert, @Paticia and @Brenda: We apologize for the late response. For more information about our DNA test and to order this, please follow this link: dna.ancestry.com. We’ve also attached a link to an article here with some tips for collecting the sample: http://ancstry.me/2b81OG9.

  81. Carolyn

    If I don’t know anything about my paternal grandfather how can I know if any results refer you to him? I would not recognize any names.

  82. Vicki

    I wish that the people who have had their DNA tested would link their results to their family records so that we could connect our family lines. So many of the close kinships are not linked or are private. What fun is that not to be able to explore and connect? Just saying.

  83. Lois

    If my paternal nephew gets tested, is it possible for me to figure out my paternal heritage by studying his ?

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Lois: The DNA we inherit is completely random, so your DNA profile won’t be the same as your nephews. Each person could have picked up genetic information from different ancestors in the gene pool in the distant past. Please see more information about DNA inheritance here: http://ancstry.me/1On7OIu.

  84. Debra Hevener

    I’ve been trying to find my MOTHERS SIDE + it keeps coming up my FATHERS SIDE..I’m getting very frustrated, my MOTHERS MAME IS ARLENE LOUISE ROTE + my FATHERS NAME IS ROBERT I. Brugger, I’m searching for NATIVE AMERICAN BLOOD LINE.

  85. Grier

    I am frustrated with the majority of people who are me close DNA matches but won’t acknowledge my messages to them – you should have a box they could check that says don’t contact me – I am not interested in pursuing any connections. Why did they even bother? And such a high number with no family trees – they are just cluttering up the DNA page – wish they weren’t shown – they are getting in my way. There should be a link for people who seriously want to find relatives.

  86. Gloria Mesa

    I was born in Cuba, my family is from the Canary Islands, Spain. But we live in Florida. I wish Ancestry had more information about Spanish descendants. Or more Latin Amrican countries… So far, I can only find information on Mexico?

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @George: Please follow this link for more information about our DNA test and the price of this: dna.ancestry.com

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Jason: We have different types of subscriptions with different costs, please see more information here: http://ancstry.me/2efLNN6 (if you start by setting up a 14 day free trial and you don’t want it to renew into a paid subscription, please be aware that you will need to cancel this then within the 14 days). Although we don’t do the research for you we do have the tools for you to research your family history. We recommend that you start with yourself and build your tree from there if you haven’t already done so. The attached article will go over some great steps: http://ancstry.me/29A77se. We’ve also attached a link to another article that we hope will be helpful: http://ancstry.me/29ywn2X. Here’s another link that will show you more information about the DNA test and the price, we hope this helps.

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Joe: For more information about our DNA test and to order this, please follow this link: dna.ancestry.com. We’ve also attached a link to an article here with some tips for collecting the sample: http://ancstry.me/2b81OG9.

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Paul: The DNA test can show if you inherited the markers for Native American. But you do not inherit every trait or marker from your Ancestors so even if you are a direct descendant it might not show up in your DNA test. The results do not provide a specific tribal affiliation, however. Please see the following articles that explains more about this: http://ancstry.me/23Yktn5 and http://ancstry.me/1Yrotvv.

  87. Joe carbone

    my mother was sicilian and my father was calabrese…… im 100% italian…. if i take your test are you going to tell me im scottish?.. give me a break… if you seen my olive skin and black hair and italian look you would not even have to give me a DNA test…lol

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Richelle: For more information about our DNA test and to order this, please follow this link: dna.ancestry.com. We hope you will be happy with your results and please let us know if you have any further questions 🙂

  88. Leslie Mickelson-Carter

    My mother and father were divorced when I was two years old. I had been searching for my father for many years and the rest of my Norwegian family. In 2014, I received the DNA test as a birthday present from my husband . Since then, after receiving the results I have found my first cousin on my Norwegian family side and then my half-sister! All because of DNA. Now I have just spent a wonderful week with my sister and have also met a cousin on my mother’s side who had no knowledge of his family. DNA has connected broken family ties that otherwise may have never been known. I since have given my husband his Ancestry DNA test and he has found he is not English as he thought with the last name, Carter, but Irish and both of us have Jewish blood in us as well. We have alot of research ahead!

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Leslie: Thank you for sharing your story with us Leslie. It’s amazing to hear and we’re so happy to hear that our test could help you reconnect with your family, best of luck with your further research! 🙂

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Maricela: You can still take the DNA test and you can also start building your tree with the information that you do have. The DNA test will match you with anyone who have also taken the test and that share DNA with you. This is an autosomal test so it will test both the maternal and paternal line. Please find more information here: http://ancstry.me/2ahvPBk. We recommend that you start with yourself and build your tree from there if you haven’t already done so. The attached article will go over some great steps: http://ancstry.me/29A77se. We’ve also attached a link to another article that we hope will be helpful: http://ancstry.me/29ywn2X.

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Ruben: For more information about our DNA test and to order this, please follow this link: dna.ancestry.com. We’ve also attached a link to an article here with some tips for collecting the sample: http://ancstry.me/2b81OG9.

  89. Don

    I am curious that all men and women who have submitted comments are from USA or European countries. Have any come from Asian countries?

    Secondly, I am new to this website and want to know what type of bodily fluid do participants submit for the DNA analysis. A neighbor told me he submitted a swab from inside his cheek for a similar kind of test but didn’t identify the web site promoting the background of his results.

    Can you help clarify company web sites that promote different type of results using assorted bodily type samples (blood, mouth swabs, and other) provided by its participating customers?

    Will you also answer my question about the lack of Asian participants?

    Thank you, my e-mail:
    “idonwongsr@gmail.com”

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Don: Our test uses microarray-based autosomal DNA testing, which uses a simple saliva sample to survey a person’s entire genome at over 700,000 locations. Our online interface then integrates state-of-the art family history tools with your DNA results to provide you with cutting-edge family history research. Autosomal DNA tests survey DNA inherited from autosomal chromosomes, chromosomes that do not determine sex. Autosomal testing allows you to find family across all lines in your family tree. That means both men and women can take the test, and the results are not limited to just the direct maternal or paternal lines. Currently the Ethnicity Estimate for Ancestry DNA provides estimates for 26 regions including one for South Asia which is centered on India and its bordering countries. At present this area is not broken down into smaller regions but we would stress that we are always looking for ways to improve our panel so would not rule out changes being made in the future.For the sake of comparison it is always worth mentioning that the science behind our test is still evolving. Tests similar to this that existed 3 or 4 years ago were often only able to predict Ethnicity down to much broader groupings such as Asia, Europe, or the America’s. The link included below has a more detailed breakdown of the regions we cover at the moment if you would like more information: http://ancstry.me/1On7OIu

  90. Willie E Saddler

    When and my grandparents is from down in the cartridge Texas which is DeBary last name is Burns and Saddler

  91. Willie E Saddler

    When and my grandparents is from down in the cartridge Texas which is DeBary last name is Burns and Saddler a mile ahead for families is

  92. Steve Peterson

    To ALL Of this I say, “REALLY!” How many saliva swab samples does Ancestry receive on a daily basis? Realistically, there is no way to guard against contaminating any given sample in the home and/or lab. And, considering the work ethic in America today, and the number of daily samples sent and received, the probability of confusing samples must be rather high.

  93. Michael Morrison

    Dear All,
    As an endorsement of any kind of information about your family services and ancestry projects, you all might be interested in knowing that the Mormons have an extensive range of services and information about people in the English speaking world and from EU. Michael

  94. Patricia Thames

    I already know I have 5 lines of vikings in my family from the research my father has done. Princess Olfa of Dublin, Scottish highlanders, Danish, Viking settlement in Kive Russia, and Scandinavian.
    For the person surprised by the Scottish/Irish connection. The Scottish open settlement on the west coast of Scotland to the Irish and they had been intermarriage before that. My father thinks he had a grandmother in the 1700s that was Cherokee in South Carolina. I would like to see if that shows up.

  95. margaret wagner

    I am 87 years old and do not have a single little piece of ancestry. I was adopted at birth from the Willows Maternity Sanitarium in Kansas City, MO. In communications
    I was told they could not help me. They burned all records.

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Charles: For more information about our DNA test and to order this, please follow this link: dna.ancestry.com. We’ve also attached a link to an article here with some tips for collecting the sample: http://ancstry.me/2b81OG9.

  96. Eralia

    I took a DNA last year and I gotten a lot of Irish at 25% with the range as high as 40% (that is the most of any single ethnicity I gotten) and it seems to be coming from my dad’s side who are Mexican Americans/Hispanics as some of my dad’s relatives took the test and their results came back as Native American, Italian/Greek, Irish and Iberian. I wonder about the Italian and Irish and less Spanish. Must be some ancestors we don’t know about and I would really like to know (I am surprised as a lot of it comes from his side instead of my mom’s as my cousins on her side get more Europe West and Great Britain. My mom’s family is mostly German and English with some Dutch and distant Welsh).

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Eralia: We create your genetic ethnicity estimate by comparing your DNA to the DNA of people in our reference panel. The AncestryDNA reference panel contains 3,000 DNA samples from people in 26 global regions which go back up to 10 generations. The test goes back 500-1000 years. We attached a link to an article here that explains more: http://ancstry.me/1On7OIu. We also have a number of helpful articles available from the DNA results page. These can be accessed by clicking on the question mark icon located in the top right of either of your results pages. There are 8 great articles here (on the ethnicity page). We hope you will find these helpful.

  97. Mary Ellen

    Yes, AncestryDNA.com does find Native American blood! I am Hispanic with black hair, dark brown eyes and coffee with cream skin and full lips (People have mistaken me for Greek, Mediterranean Jew, and Iranian, and wonder what exotic ethinc background I have) . With Native American blood from both my Hispanic parents (mom’s family looks more Indian from South Texas – before it was even Texas in 1848, dad’s family looks more European even if his ancestors were from Mexico and migrated to Texas before 1920 – they are definitely more European ). AncestryDNA correctly identified me as: 53% Native American (southern part of Texas and Mexico – Dad’s side), 17 % Italian/Greek, 16 % Iberian Peninsula, with a little bit of other Western European, and a tiny bit of Irish, Eastern European Jewish, and African. So yes, AncestryDNA does identify Native American even if one is not from the 12 tribes that made treaties with America like the Sioux Nation. So, there are so many nameless tribes (we lost our tribal names before the 1700’s and and were given Spanish/Portuguese surnames) Native Americans which are not counted as Native American but, we are! And our blood proves it!

  98. Mary Ellen

    Can’t wait until AncestryDNA can differentiate between Spanish and Portuguese, and Italian and Greek, and the different areas of the Americas for Native Americans – like from the Southwest as apposed to the Eastern or the Western parts of America! So excited about the future of genetic markers!

  99. Mary Ellen

    To people who have not gotten your DNA results for over 8 weeks. Just an fyi… For one, it does sometimes take over 8 weeks. And, AncestryDNA will never mail you the results, so don’t expect it in the mail. Plus, tt will only be available on-line. So, make sure you follow the directions with your kit. You must make an account with AncestryDNA.com, you must give a valid email address (also check your spam folder). After 8 weeks, also check your AncestryDNA.com account, your DNA results might be posted. After a long time, I believe 10 weeks, I got an email message from AncestryDNA, with a link to click to get to my DNA results which took me to my AncestryDNA.com account. I hope this helps. Be careful to complete all the steps completely especially make sure your bar code scan numbers match between the same you send in and the account you create. Don’t forget to spit into the vial with the complete sample to the line marked on the vial. There should be no bubbles below the line, only spit. Keep the bar code number, the date you mailed it (mail it right away so the sample does not degrade) and your password in a safe place.

  100. Duane Willis

    my grandmother on my father’s side what is 1/2 Cherokee and her husband was 1/4 Cherokee. I had me and my sister’s DNA tested and neither of us have ANY native American blood according to the test. I was British and Irish only. 89% British. They said I had more British blood than people born in Britain. I should be 18 to 20% Native American. I honestly don’t believe these tests are accurate. Even though I never met my grandfather who was 1/4 Cherokee I did know my grandmother who was half Cherokee very well and there is no doubt of her bloodline. Where is my missing blood?

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Theresa You can check out our current memberships and prices on Ancestry.com. If you need any further assistance, please do not hesitate to contact us by phone at 1-800-262-3787.

  101. Harriett Kraatz

    Thank for your last mail in November. Yes, what you found is right and gives me names i Longed to know. Ma real question is :”am I Jewish?”. Kraatz familly came from Poland, got to Germany and around 1840 left for Brooklin. My grand father Emil Kraatz was born there then the familly returned to Hamburg; my grand-father was about 20: he became the german champion in ice skating. Then he opened a big ballroom dancing shcool in Hamburg in the road ?English Aplanker?. His son, my father Harry Wilhelm Leonard Kraatz was born in 1895, third of the children = first Lilly then Emil (who during the last war sold violins in Spain as Franco did not sell jews to Hitler) then my father young in the first world war was sent to the front and at last their little brother Wolfgang (sent to the horrible VERDUN and was killed aged 17) My father managed to leave Germany in 1933. I don’t know anything more of my father’s familly exept for what YOU FOUND FOR ME. Can you do something about all this ? I can’t find anything about the deaths of My gran father and my grand mother……. Very touched by your last findings you sent to me, Harriett.

    • Member Services Social Support Team

      @Robert your results are ready. Please call us on 1-800-262-3787 for help accessing them.

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