Posted by Ancestry Team on September 12, 2014 in In The Community

Sometimes what we read in a week follows a theme. There are those weeks when everyone seems to be writing about the same thing — or maybe subconsciously we’re just noticing the same subjects. That definitely wasn’t the case this week! In the past few days, everything from ancestors who were former slaves to non-paternity events to unusual libraries caught our eye. We hope you enjoy this eclectic mix!

Bristow Harris or Was It Bristoe, Brister or Bristol?” by Andrea Kelleher, on How Did I Get Here? My Amazing Genealogy Journey. No matter his first name, Andrea is proud of her 3rd great-grandfather who was a former slave. She used city directories to recreate his later life.

Can We Stop Calling Grandma a Whore?” by Kerry Scott, on Clue Wagon. Kerry reminds us that when it comes to non-paternity events in our tree, we usually won’t know the “why” of what happened.

Handwritten Bird’s Means So Much More,” by Simon Bird, on The Branches of My Tree. We treasure those records that our ancestors wrote. What are we leaving for our descendants?

The Many Lives of an Old Railroad Car,” by Laurie Thompson, on Anne T. Kent California Room Community Newsletter (Marin County Free Library). We’ve heard of bookmobiles, but a library branch in a railroad car? This was a new one for us!

A Soldier Boy’s Creed,” by Schalene Dagutis, on Tangled Roots and Trees. Schalene’s tribute to Julius Franklin Collins who died in World War I is not only beautiful, it also serves as a reminder that newspapers have so much more than obituaries.

photo of brothers reading a book-fifties

 

What are you reading this week? Share in the comments below for others to enjoy as well.

 

Previous “What We Are Reading” posts: 

 

 

 

1 Comment

  1. I am reading “Making Haste From Babylon: The Mayflower Pilgrims and Their World — A New History” a very detailed account of the Mayflower and the Pilgrims from a perspective across the pong in England. The book is a 2010 publication authored by British writer Nick Bunker. It is a perfect companion read to “Mayflower” by Nathaniel Philbrick.

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