Posted by on 6 October 2011 in 15 minutes with 15 collections, General, Record Collections

Don’t miss today’s installment of our ‘15 minutes with 15 collections’ series! For our sixth free collection, we’ve made our Australian Electoral Rolls, 1903-1954, available for everyone to use. They’ll stay that way until October 15th.

From the arrival of the ‘First Fleet’ in 1788, British migrants were largely responsible for populating Australia. You’ll find thousands of these travelers – and their descendents – in our electoral rolls, together with their genders, addresses and occupations.

TOP TIP
When you’re searching our electoral rolls, it’s important to remember that they cover a number of years within a single collection. That means that your ancestors may well turn up several times – instead of just finding the best result, you should keep looking for further matches. It’s even possible that you could come across the same person in two different places in the same year.

Come back tomorrow for free access to our Texas Birth Index, 1903-1997.

See all our free record collections this month 
* Each collection will become available to search for free from 7am BST on the relevant day.  All collections will be available to search until 12 midnight BST on 15 October 2011.  To view these records you will need to register for free with Ancestry.co.uk with your name and email address.

1 Comment

hank muller 

Autralian Electoral rolls (1903-1980) information is very interesting,unfortunately it does not appear very complete,just to check how reliable it is ,I used my own name (naturalised in 1964)on the rolls and voted in every state and federal election since,however I’m not there,but I,m glad to say,my wife appeared in 1968 in NSW.

I know you said the “Free” records were to 1954 but your Webpage is to 1980,

Does this mean that you have “Clipped” these records out or got “lost” in the translation.

By the way “Tasmania” IS part of Australia but certainly could not find to many records!

Hank Muller,Tasmania

12 October 2011 at 8:50 am