Comments on: The Science Team at AncestryDNA http://blogs.ancestry.com/techroots/the-science-team-at-ancestrydna/ Ancestry.com Tech Roots Blogs Thu, 21 Aug 2014 09:43:43 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.5.2 By: AncestryDNA Goes to DNA Days in DChttp://blogs.ancestry.com/techroots/the-science-team-at-ancestrydna/#comment-19500 AncestryDNA Goes to DNA Days in DC Wed, 20 Aug 2014 14:14:25 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/techroots/?p=962#comment-19500 [...] a half-million people in the AncestryDNA database has given our science team a lot of exciting data to look at and carefully analyze. I think it is impressive that we have so [...]

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By: The DNA matching research and development life cyclehttp://blogs.ancestry.com/techroots/the-science-team-at-ancestrydna/#comment-19480 The DNA matching research and development life cycle Tue, 19 Aug 2014 20:24:33 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/techroots/?p=962#comment-19480 [...] genetics suggest that they are related through a recent common ancestor. But DNA matching is an evolving science.  By analyzing the results from our current method for DNA matching, we have learned how we might [...]

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By: What Do Boston, Philadelphia, and Pittsburgh Have in Common?http://blogs.ancestry.com/techroots/the-science-team-at-ancestrydna/#comment-12884 What Do Boston, Philadelphia, and Pittsburgh Have in Common? Fri, 14 Mar 2014 19:21:55 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/techroots/?p=962#comment-12884 [...] on AncestryDNA ethnicity estimates for over 300,000 AncestryDNA customers*, the AncestryDNA science team set out to discover the “most Irish” regions of the [...]

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By: Julie Grankahttp://blogs.ancestry.com/techroots/the-science-team-at-ancestrydna/#comment-4160 Julie Granka Fri, 01 Nov 2013 17:11:12 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/techroots/?p=962#comment-4160 Thank you for your interest. Please visit http://dna.ancestry.com.

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By: Julie Grankahttp://blogs.ancestry.com/techroots/the-science-team-at-ancestrydna/#comment-4159 Julie Granka Fri, 01 Nov 2013 17:07:38 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/techroots/?p=962#comment-4159 Thank you for your interest, Richard. After taking a DNA test, an individual may see where their genetic ethnicity estimates and the birth locations in their tree line up. In addition, one can compare the birth locations in their own tree to those in the trees of their DNA relatives.

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By: Unraveling the Science Behind Ethnicity Estimationhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/techroots/the-science-team-at-ancestrydna/#comment-4023 Unraveling the Science Behind Ethnicity Estimation Mon, 28 Oct 2013 20:05:12 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/techroots/?p=962#comment-4023 [...] means that the AncestryDNA science team will be up late, drinking pop, soda, coke, and, according to the British scientist on our team, [...]

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By: Ruthann Grayhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/techroots/the-science-team-at-ancestrydna/#comment-3964 Ruthann Gray Sun, 27 Oct 2013 18:04:41 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/techroots/?p=962#comment-3964 How can I get my DNA testing done ,and can it then be put on my tree?

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By: Richard Tallenthttp://blogs.ancestry.com/techroots/the-science-team-at-ancestrydna/#comment-3296 Richard Tallent Sun, 29 Sep 2013 07:06:31 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/techroots/?p=962#comment-3296 This may seem like an obvious question, but do you attempt to correlate member DNA with the general places (countries, states, etc.) listed up the line in their trees?

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