If You Have Virginia Relatives, Governor McAullife Has Good News for You

Posted by Paul Rawlins on June 26, 2015 in Family History

Do you have Virginia ancestors?  Wouldn’t it be great if you could have access to Virginia birth, marriage, death, and divorce records? Can you imagine the goodies that you might find in there? Parents names and birth places, birth, marriage, and death dates and places, possible other relatives, burial places.  Sounds like a recipe to… Read more

Hard Time: More Escape Stories from Clinton Prison

Posted by Ancestry Team on June 23, 2015 in Family History

New York’s Clinton Correctional Facility — or Dannemora as it’s often known — became a regular part of the national news when two convicted murderers, Richard Matt and David Sweat, escaped using power tools. Though the entire situation seems like a plot straight out of a movie, this isn’t the first time prisoners used tools… Read more

9 Famous People Who Married Their Cousins

Posted by Ancestry Team on June 12, 2015 in Family History

In many cultures around the world, it is frowned upon to marry your cousin (and in some countries even illegal), but that hasn’t stopped people throughout history from doing it. From presidents like Martin Van Buren and John Adams to royals like Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, historical figures have often engaged in this practice.… Read more

What Tools Can African Americans Use to Learn About Their Ancestry?

Posted by Ancestry Team on June 9, 2015 in Family History

African Americans increasingly turn to Ancestry to research their family history. In recent years, digitized records and advanced DNA tests have made it possible to trace your roots to slave plantations, armies, and even African regions of origin. Since their ancestors usually came to the United States on slave ships — without immigration records —… Read more

How Popular Are These 10 Old Baby Girl Names?

Posted by sdalton on May 29, 2015 in Family History

The popularity of baby names comes and goes, and often a name will make a major comeback decades after it was first popular. Here are 10 baby girl names that were popular in the early 20th century, and how they rank among today’s baby girl names.   Popularity: Number of Babies per 1M | MooseRoots… Read more

What Did People Eat In The 1800s?

Posted by Ancestry Team on April 29, 2015 in Family History

The War of 1812 concluded in 1815, and in the decades to come, the United States developed a vast transportation system, a national bank, and interstate trade. The economy blossomed, and canals, roads, cities, and industrialization expanded. England’s defeat in the War of 1812 also removed barriers to westward expansion and, tragically, accelerated Native American… Read more

The Girl With the Tattooed Face

Posted by Ancestry Team on April 17, 2015 in Family History

The girl with the tattooed face became something of a legend, but she started out as an ordinary girl. Olive Oatman and her younger sister, Mary Ann, were kidnapped by Indians in 1851. They eventually ended up living with a tribe of the Mojave, where they were both tattooed with distinctive blue markings on their… Read more

What Your Grandmother Was Like as a Teenager

Posted by Ancestry Team on April 17, 2015 in Family History

The concept of “teenager” being a distinct part of life complete with its own lifestyle — let alone one with time to sit around texting on their phones — is a 20th-century one that didn’t really exist until about the 1940s. Prior to the 1900s, many young people left school and worked, either on the… Read more

Debunking the American Dream: Immigrants Did Better in 1900 Than in 2000

Posted by Paul Rawlins on April 16, 2015 in Family History

It’s a familiar story: An immigrant family makes their way to America. They start out with little money in their pockets, but with determination and hard work, they climb their way up the economic ladder. That’s the cliché, but it may not be accurate according to new research. “Conventional wisdom about immigrants and the American Dream… Read more

12 People Who Missed Their Trip on the Titanic

Posted by Paul Rawlins on April 16, 2015 in Family History

On April 15, 1912, the Titanic slammed into an iceberg in the North Atlantic and sank, sending 1,517 souls into the cold deep. Since that dark night, the legend of the Titanic has only grown, propelled by the glamour of the ship and its first-class passengers, complicated by the immigrant dreams of its steerage travelers,… Read more