What Your Grandmother Was Like as a Teenager

Posted by Ancestry Team on April 17, 2015 in Family History

The concept of “teenager” being a distinct part of life complete with its own lifestyle — let alone one with time to sit around texting on their phones — is a 20th-century one that didn’t really exist until about the 1940s. Prior to the 1900s, many young people left school and worked, either on the… Read more

Debunking the American Dream: Immigrants Did Better in 1900 Than in 2000

Posted by Paul Rawlins on April 16, 2015 in Family History

It’s a familiar story: An immigrant family makes their way to America. They start out with little money in their pockets, but with determination and hard work, they climb their way up the economic ladder. That’s the cliché, but it may not be accurate according to new research. “Conventional wisdom about immigrants and the American Dream… Read more

12 People Who Missed Their Trip on the Titanic

Posted by Paul Rawlins on April 16, 2015 in Family History

On April 15, 1912, the Titanic slammed into an iceberg in the North Atlantic and sank, sending 1,517 souls into the cold deep. Since that dark night, the legend of the Titanic has only grown, propelled by the glamour of the ship and its first-class passengers, complicated by the immigrant dreams of its steerage travelers,… Read more

The 6 Best Ways to Start Researching Your Family History

Posted by Paul Rawlins on April 16, 2015 in Family History

Do you know the names of all four of your grandparents? What about your eight great-grandparents? (Did you know you have eight great-grandparents?) Do you know what your last name means or if you were named after an uncle or a grandmother? If you’ve always wanted to find out more about your family history but… Read more

Did Your Ancestors End Up in the Poorhouse?

Posted by Ancestry Team on April 13, 2015 in Family History

Did your parents used to warn: “We’ll end up in the poorhouse!” Nowadays, it’s just an expression. For earlier generations, though, it was a real fear. But what was the poorhouse? And who ended up there? There really were poorhouses, though sometimes they were called by different names. In some areas it was the almshouse,… Read more

Six Sensational Murder Trials in History

Posted by Ancestry Team on April 13, 2015 in Family History

“Murder most foul.” It occurs roughly 16,000 times a year here in the United States, but only a select few capture the nation’s interest and fascination. Why do some murders — and their resulting trials — attract more attention than others? Sometimes the trials involve a famous (or infamous) defendant or a particularly well-known or innocent… Read more

12 Questionable Pieces of Retro Advice

Posted by Ancestry Team on March 31, 2015 in Family History

From Dorothy Dix to Ann Landers, advice columns have long filled American newspapers. The archives on Ancestry are rich with pointers on how to snag a man or behave in polite company. They’re a window into the social mores of different eras — many of which are thankfully long gone. If you’re looking for some… Read more

How to Find a Woman: Tracing Mottie Winters Through 1800s Kentucky

Posted by sdalton on March 3, 2015 in Family History

I am new to Ancestry.com and I am hoping you can help me. My great-great-grandmother is S. Mottie Winters. She was born 22 January 1866, possibly in Tennessee, and died 18 May 1891 in Murray, Kentucky. She is listed on Find A Grave, but that is the only mention I can find of her. She… Read more

Virtual Genealogy Gets an Update in The Sims

Posted by Ancestry Team on March 3, 2015 in Family History

Video games and genealogy are two of America’s favorite pastimes, separated by what might seem like a wide generational divide. Unless, of course, you’re talking about The Sims. Virtual Genealogy In this life simulation game, where no one wins or loses, family tracking is a way of keeping tabs on your progress, says senior producer… Read more

Finding Your Family History on the Printed Page

Posted by sdalton on February 28, 2015 in Family History

  I am stuck finding more information about my grandfather, Leland Wright. From a 1930 U.S. Census I know he lived in Florida and was born in Ohio about 1883. Can you help me? ~ Edmund ________________ It’s a safe bet that you should always start with the United States census when you’re beginning the search… Read more