New Collaborative Features Added to Trees at Ancestry

While I was out of the office last week, Ancestry launched some new features to the trees, which allow contributors to online trees to add photos and document images, making it easier for families to collaborate and share family treasures.  Below is the press release announcing the changes.

ANCESTRY.COM INTRODUCES NEW COLLABORATIVE FEATURES FOR FAMILIES TO SHARE AND PRESERVE FAMILY MEMORIES ONLINE THIS HOLIDAY SEASON

Now the Entire Family Can Add Photos, Stories and Other Family Treasures to a Shared Family Tree

PROVO, UTAH – December 21, 2006 – To celebrate the holiday season, Ancestry.com, the world’s largest online family history resource, today introduced new site features that make building family history something a family can do together. The new site enhancements let amateur family historians everywhere get the whole family involved in the creation and preservation of their personal family history. Now, anyone can build a family tree for free and invite their loved ones to contribute photographs, stories, cherished family documents, and personal memorials to a shared family tree, whether they live in the same home or are spread out across the world.

A family historian can either keep these personal memories and archival photos private on their Ancestry.com family tree, or they can choose to share their family history with the world on Ancestry.com, contributing to the largest collection of online family history records. When they are shared, these historical family photos and scanned documents then become searchable on Ancestry.com and available for family members, far and wide, to discover and add to their own family legacies.

When getting together with loved ones for the holidays, family members can bring their favorite family photos and memorabilia and take advantage of the time together to collect pieces of their family stories. Home sources such as photographs, family Bibles, documents (birth, marriage, or death certificates, etc.) and other heirlooms are often the best place to start when building a family tree. Searching through these keepsakes could reveal fascinating details about a family’s past.

“All of us have treasured family photographs, documents, and letters stored in the back of our closets, attics, and filing cabinets,” said Tim Sullivan, CEO of The Generations Network, parent company of Ancestry.com. “We all also have powerful memories, rich stories, and incredible family lore, both present and past.  Now Ancestry.com lets a family work together to gather all of these memories, stories and heirloom documents in one place online to be shared and preserved for future generations. We’re committed to making family history easier and something that families everywhere can do together.”

Ancestry.com offers a comprehensive features set that empowers families to capture memories and relive the past through features such as family trees and person pages, a central source for photos, timelines, stories, and other rich records for each family member. The new enhancements will allow families to more easily share and bring their family legacies to life online.

In the past five months, Ancestry.com has experienced a surge in user-contributed content with more than 275,000 newly uploaded photos and 800,000 family trees created.

About Ancestry.com
With more than 5 billion names and 23,000 searchable databases and titles, Ancestry.com is the No. 1 online source for family history information. Since its launch almost a decade ago, Ancestry.com has been the premier resource for family history, simplifying genealogical research for millions of people by providing them with many easy-to-use tools and resources to build their own unique family trees. The Generations Network of family history sites, of which Ancestry is the largest, receives more than 9 million unique visitors worldwide and 450 million page views each month (© comScore Media Metrix, September 2006).

Media Contact

Julia Burgon
Coltrin & Associates for Ancestry.com
212-221-1616 ext. 124
julia_burgon@coltrin.com

Tola St. Matthew-Daniel
Coltrin & Associates for Ancestry.com
212-221-1616 ext. 101
tola_stmatthew-daniel@coltrin.com

4 thoughts on “New Collaborative Features Added to Trees at Ancestry

  1. I have FTM 2006 when I check for updates it tellsme there are updates available, but i cannot add them. I calleda few months ago and they said they wer working on the problem. It is still the same and causes my computer roblems that i have to removit and reinstall it. Please advise.

    Bert Kuffner

  2. I would love to see ancestry.com add a feature where we could add a photo to a census record. I often find vintage photos on ebay with the subjects identified. This past week I looked up the subject of an ebay photo and easily found the family in Scranton, PA in 1910 (the photo was ca1911). This family did not appear anywhere in the family trees at ancestry.com. I would have loved to add the photo to the census image for a descendant to find in the future.

  3. I agree with Catherine that it would be nice to be able to add a photo to a census record. I would also like to have a place to submit photos of people not directly connected to my family. I have several early 1900 family albums with identified photos of friends of my family for this time period. I would like to have a place where someone connected might find these.

    Also, I have many old and new obituaries. There needs to be a place for these to be contributed, too. They might contain just the name someone needs to move forward.

  4. I think I remember reading a few months back, that there was a web site that you can see the “remembrance cards” from funerals. I might be wrong, but I think I also read where you can send or scan them to Ancestry. I will look once again for the article to make sure that my mind was not playing tricks on me. I think I have three “remembrance cards” from family members.

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