Ancestry.com.au Blog » Marriages http://blogs.ancestry.com/au Where family history comes alive Wed, 25 Mar 2015 04:57:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.5.2 Member benefit. Order discounted BDM certificate transcriptions for NSWhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/au/2015/03/19/member-benefit-order-discounted-bdm-certificate-transcriptions/ http://blogs.ancestry.com/au/2015/03/19/member-benefit-order-discounted-bdm-certificate-transcriptions/#comments Thu, 19 Mar 2015 00:54:52 +0000 Ancestry.com.au http://blogs.ancestry.com/au/?p=2293 Ancestry members can now order Birth, Death and Marriage certificate transcriptions for New South Wales at a discounted rate, just $17.50, from GeniCert with our friends at Marilyn Rowan transcriptions. The transcriptions can only be ordered direct via your Ancestry subscription. So you have to be logged in to your Ancestry membership to search on… Read more

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Ancestry members can now order Birth, Death and Marriage certificate transcriptions for New South Wales at a discounted rate, just $17.50, from GeniCert with our friends at Marilyn Rowan transcriptions.

The transcriptions can only be ordered direct via your Ancestry subscription. So you have to be logged in to your Ancestry membership to search on the Australian Birth, Death and Marriage [BDM] collections. Here’s some handy links to the Birth, Deaths and Marriage sets:

Australia, Birth Index, 1788-1922
Australia, Death Index, 1787-1985
Australia, Marriage Index, 1788-1950

So, how do you take advantage of this great offer and order your certificate transcriptions? Please read on for tips on how to order.

First, log into Ancestry with your username / email and password and either double click on “Search” on the main menu to find all of the Australian collections:

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Or hover your cursor over “Search” and select “Birth, Death & Marriage” from the drop list.

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Then search the Australian BDM collections for your ancestor:

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Results for your search will be returned, including records for all states and territories that relate to your search terms:

GeniCert_Marriage_Jessie Baker_190315

Click on the cart image on the far right on the search results relating to New South Wales records and you’ll taken to GeniCert to allow you to order the transcription of the certificate type that relates to your search. In the example below, you’ll notice that this order is for a Marriage certificate transcription.

GeniCert_Marriage_Jessie Baker_Transcription Order_230215

At this stage you’re able to view a sample, see the “View a Sample” button in the top right of the window, or proceed to buy by clicking on the “Checkout” button. At any time during the process, you’re able to send an email to info@genicert.com with any questions you have.

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Clicking on “Checkout” to buy the certificate transcription, you’ll need to login to GeniCert or create a GeniCert account if you’re new to their service.

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The signup process is simple to follow and once purchased GeniCert has committed to providing the certificate transcription in 5 to 7 days. Again, if you have any issues during the sign-up and ordering processing, please send to info@genicert.com with your questions.

Happy searching and fingers crossed you find the person you’re looking for. Try it out today!

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Top Tips for Searching Marriage Recordshttp://blogs.ancestry.com/au/2014/02/04/top-tips-for-searching-marriage-records/ http://blogs.ancestry.com/au/2014/02/04/top-tips-for-searching-marriage-records/#comments Mon, 03 Feb 2014 23:50:17 +0000 Ancestry.com.au http://blogs.ancestry.com/au/?p=2118 Vital records—records of births, marriage, and death—are the basic building blocks of family history research as they contain lots of information for your family tree. Marriage records can reveal religion and other details like age and place of birth, occupation, residences, and parents’ names. We’ve put together our top search tips to help you make… Read more

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Arge's Wedding

Vital records—records of births, marriage, and death—are the basic building blocks of family history research as they contain lots of information for your family tree.

Marriage records can reveal religion and other details like age and place of birth, occupation, residences, and parents’ names.

We’ve put together our top search tips to help you make the most of our Marriage records.

  • Narrow your search for marriage records by looking at the age and birthplace of the first child. This information can also be found in census records. Start your search a year prior to the child’s birth and gradually widen your search back (and forward) in time until you locate the record. Tracing your ancestor through directories can be helpful as well.
  • Seek out the marriage records for all family members. Information found on the records of siblings may include helpful details that aren’t found on your ancestor’s record.
  • When you find a record in a marriage index, always follow up and request the original record. Click on the database title and the source information and description on the collection page will tell you where the records are held.
  • Keep in mind that when civil registration first began, not everyone complied immediately. When you can’t locate a civil marriage record, look for census records and directories that can place your ancestor in a particular place around the time of the marriage. Then investigate churches in the area where the couple might have been married.
  • Once you find a matching record, save it to your family tree – that way you can provide evidence to back up the info in your family tree, easily share your discover with your family, and quickly find the historical record again later.

What’s your top tip on searching marriage records? Let us know on our Facebook page.

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Manchester Parish Records – how do they appear online?http://blogs.ancestry.com/au/2013/02/19/manchester-parish-records-how-do-they-appear-online/ http://blogs.ancestry.com/au/2013/02/19/manchester-parish-records-how-do-they-appear-online/#comments Mon, 18 Feb 2013 23:21:30 +0000 Ancestry.com.au http://blogs.ancestry.com/au/?p=1856 Authored by Clare Connolly.  Clare is one of a team of Ancestry camera operators who have been working on the digitisation of the new Manchester Parish Registers, 1541-1985. We’ve just launched onsite the new Manchester Parish Records, 1541-1985. These crucial records are the result of months of work behind the scenes to digitise the original… Read more

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Authored by Clare Connolly.  Clare is one of a team of Ancestry camera operators who have been working on the digitisation of the new Manchester Parish Registers, 1541-1985.

We’ve just launched onsite the new Manchester Parish Records, 1541-1985. These crucial records are the result of months of work behind the scenes to digitise the original registers. I can give you an insight into that work from my point of view as one of the camera operators.

The registers are held by Manchester Libraries, Information and Archives which is the appointed Diocesan Record Office for the area. The registers date right back to Tudor times, and consist of baptism, marriage and burial records.

The role of the camera operator involves entering details about each register onto the Ancestry software, including the name of the church and date range covered. Then the register is photographed from cover to cover, with the images saved directly to the computer.

Many of the volumes are fragile due to their age, and careful handing is essential to prevent damage. We use book supports and archival weights to protect the documents and hold pages in place. The camera height can be adjusted depending on the size of the volume – obviously the key is to make sure the writing is in focus. It’s important to get as clear an image as possible as some of the ink has faded and handwriting styles vary greatly.

Different types of register reveal different information. Most of the early registers grouped baptisms, marriages and burials in the same volume.  As time went on more information was recorded; the mother’s name was more likely to be entered on baptism records, the parishes of both the bride and groom appeared in marriage registers and the age of the deceased and sometimes cause of death were noted in burials.  Then in 1813 pre-printed baptism and burial registers were introduced, recording details of where people lived and their professions.

These professions are one of the most interesting features of the parish registers, and they often reveal the development of local industries. Greater Manchester is well known for its manufacturing, transport and textiles heritage and trades relating to these industries were commonly recorded. For example, spinner, carder, dyer and spindle maker were common occupations for people working in the cotton industry.

When we’ve finished the digitisation process, we send the photographs of the registers to be transcribed, and then the images and the information they hold can be put online. Hopefully you all enjoy them, and find some useful information about your family.

Clare Connolly is one of a team of Ancestry camera operators who have been working on the digitisation of the new Manchester Parish Registers, 1541-1985.

©Images reproduced with courtesy of the Manchester City Council

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New UK Civil Divorce Records, 1858-1911http://blogs.ancestry.com/au/2013/01/18/new-uk-civil-divorce-records-1858-1911/ http://blogs.ancestry.com/au/2013/01/18/new-uk-civil-divorce-records-1858-1911/#comments Fri, 18 Jan 2013 01:16:21 +0000 Ancestry.com.au http://blogs.ancestry.com/au/?p=1830 ORIGINALLY AUTHORED BY ANCESTRY.CO.UK It’s a family history conundrum. You don’t like to imagine your ancestors having difficult lives. But every time they hit tricky times they seem to be really well documented, and provide some of your most fascinating discoveries. This is true of Poor Law records. It’s definitely the case with criminal records.… Read more

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ORIGINALLY AUTHORED BY ANCESTRY.CO.UK

It’s a family history conundrum. You don’t like to imagine your ancestors having difficult lives. But every time they hit tricky times they seem to be really well documented, and provide some of your most fascinating discoveries.

This is true of Poor Law records. It’s definitely the case with criminal records. And it crops up again with our new divorce records.

UK, Civil Divorce Records, 1858-1911  are legal records that were made as part of each divorce case. They provide a blow-by-blow account of all the claims and counter-claims that led up to the split. For example, you could find out exactly where and when your great-grand-uncle started an affair – and even who with!

On top of that, the records include an entire history of the marriage before it all went wrong. This could include the date and place of the wedding, details of any children, and even the couple’s different addresses.

That means that not only can you read about your family’s scandals, but you can use all that extra detail to find more of their birth, marriage and death records, and build up your timeline of their lives.

It almost leaves you wishing more of your ancestors had marriage problems!

Search our new divorce records

See all our birth, marriage & death records

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US Consular Reports of Marriages 1910-49http://blogs.ancestry.com/au/2011/04/04/us-consular-reports-of-marriages-1910-1949/ http://blogs.ancestry.com/au/2011/04/04/us-consular-reports-of-marriages-1910-1949/#comments Mon, 04 Apr 2011 03:06:54 +0000 Ancestry.com.au http://blogs.ancestry.com/au/?p=1018 Elaine Strang (of Michigan) and Frederick Donaldson (of Ohio) were married on 27 July 1916 by Reverend Lewis Hodous, authorized to join the couple by the laws of the state of Ohio. So why did the marriage take place in Foochow, China? Documenting the marriage of an American citizen (or citizens) overseas fell to US… Read more

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Elaine Strang (of Michigan) and Frederick Donaldson (of Ohio) were married on 27 July 1916 by Reverend Lewis Hodous, authorized to join the couple by the laws of the state of Ohio.

So why did the marriage take place in Foochow, China?

Documenting the marriage of an American citizen (or citizens) overseas fell to US consulates and embassies. In this case, Albert Pontius, the US consul at Foochow, provided a certificate of marriage bearing the seal of the consulate and recording the facts surrounding the marriage. The bride, groom, and minister were all involved in Congregationalist missionary and educational efforts, but you’ll find soldiers, travellers, and other assorted American ex-pats in these records as well.

Contained in this database are reports of US citizens’ marriages abroad submitted by US Consulates between the years 1910 and 1949. Marriage ceremonies conducted outside the US are subject to the laws of the country in which the individuals are married by civil or religious officials. Once the marriage has taken place, officers at the U.S. Consulate authenticate the foreign marriage document and report it, hence the collection of forms in this database. If the spouse is a foreign national they can then apply for U.S. citizenship. Some of the records are also accompanied by a letter regarding the status of the spouse’s passport application (whether it has been granted or denied).

Marriage certificates in the form of marriage licenses have existed far longer than either birth or death certificates in the US, which became standard on a national level in the early 1900s. Licenses were legally required as early as the 1500s in countries like England to document that neither of the individuals was married to someone else and that they were of age.

Information in these records includes:

  • Surname
  • Consulate location
  • Date
  • Birth place
  • Age
  • Spouse’s name
  • Local residence
  • Witness’s name
  • Marriage officiator

Search US Consular Reports of Marriages 1910-1949

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Fame and scandal amongst a century of ‘runaway weddings’http://blogs.ancestry.com/au/2011/02/14/fame-and-scandal-amongst-a-century-of-runaway-weddings/ http://blogs.ancestry.com/au/2011/02/14/fame-and-scandal-amongst-a-century-of-runaway-weddings/#comments Sun, 13 Feb 2011 21:45:20 +0000 Ancestry.com.au http://blogs.ancestry.com/au/?p=822 On this Valentine’s Day, we revisit the Gretna Green Marriage Registers 1795-1895, a fascinating collection which details the weddings of more than half of all Brits who crossed the Scottish border to marry without their parents’ consent. The collection, also referred to as the ‘Lang Registers’ , contains the marriage records of Gretna Green’s most… Read more

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On this Valentine’s Day, we revisit the Gretna Green Marriage Registers 1795-1895, a fascinating collection which details the weddings of more than half of all Brits who crossed the Scottish border to marry without their parents’ consent.

The collection, also referred to as the ‘Lang Registers’ , contains the marriage records of Gretna Green’s most prolific minister, David Lang, who was renowned for his ‘immodest air’ and clerical style.

Gretna Green became a popular destination for young English elopers after Lord Hardwicke’s Marriage Act, passed in 1753, required parental permission for all couples wanting to marry under the age of 21. This law did not apply in Scotland where boys could marry at 14 and girls at 12.

A mile inside the Scottish border, Gretna Green was the first changing post in Scotland for the stagecoaches on the main route from London to Edinburgh. It was also the first place couples arrived at when eloping to Scotland, resulting in thousands of weddings taking place in what quickly became known as Britain’s ‘marriage capital’.

Almost anybody could conduct a marriage ceremony in Scotland as long as two witnesses were present. This resulted in a range of tradesmen, including many blacksmiths given that Gretna Green was a changing post, setting themselves up as ‘ministers’ and charging for their services.

Dubbed ‘Anvil Priests’ by the locals, ceremonies were often conducted over the anvil with the blacksmith officiating, which was why the blacksmith and his anvil have come to symbolise Gretna Green weddings.

In order to restrict the rising number of couples eloping to Gretna, Parliament passed an act in 1857 that required for one of the parties to have resided in Scotland for a minimum of three weeks prior to the wedding for the marriage to be recognised in England. Gretna Green marriage rates were never quite the same thereafter yet its reputation as the ‘Las Vegas of the UK’ remained and lives on today.

Gretna Green wedding scandals have made newspaper headlines since the mid-1700s. Among the records are a number of notable people and famous nuptials, including:

  • The Shrigley Abduction – A national scandal in 1826, Edward Wakefield duped wealthy 15-year-old heiress Ellen Turner into marriage at Gretna Green by claiming her father, a wealthy mill owner and Sheriff of Cheshire, was a fugitive and if she would agree to marry Wakefield, her father would be saved. Ellen consented and they were married on the 8th of March 1826 by blacksmith David Lang.
  • John Lambton, 1st Earl of Durham – The marriage of the British Governor General and High Commissioner of British North America known as ‘Radical Jack’ to Lady Louisa Grey is recorded in 1816. Also a British Whig statesman and colonial administrator, Lambton was appointed a Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath in 1837 for his political work at home and abroad.

The Gretna Green Marriage Registers, 1795-1895 were transcribed as part of the Ancestry World Archives Project (AWAP), which provides the public with indexing software and training support to enable them to contribute in making even more historical records available and searchable online. To date, thousands of Ancestry members around the world have contributed their time to this project.

As the original marriage certificates which comprise this collection were badly age damaged, Ancestry experts also spent many months conserving them before they were digitised.

Search Gretna Green Marriage Registers, 1795-1895

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