Posted by on December 3, 2010 in Famous Faces, Who Do You Think You Are?

Knowing very little about his family history and intrigued by the mystery of his father’s adoption, Australian cricketing icon Rod Marsh embarks on a journey to discover his roots.

Rod’s father, Ken, never knew who his biological parents were or the circumstances around his adoption. Armed with an old birth certificate from his Aunt Amy, who was also adopted out to a different family, Rod will begin a journey to discover who his biological grandparents were. While the certificate states that she was born to a Robert William and Amy Holgate, Rod quickly discovers that all is not as it first appears.

The identity of Rod’s grandparents is just the beginning of his story, as he continues searching to find out the reasons behind his father’s adoption. Here Rod uncovers a tale of love, loss and betrayal with devastating consequences for all involved.

Rod also wants to know about the Marsh family, who took his father in at a young age. Dan Marsh, Rod’s great grandfather, was an early industrialist who capitalised on Geraldton’s growing population around the late 1800s. Further investigation reveals Dan’s convict past, but what crime did Rod’s great grandfather commit to land him in the notorious Fremantle prison?

Tune in to SBS ONE at 7.30pm on Sunday to find out what Rod discovers…

Check out this sneak peek at Sunday night’s episode.

Rod will also be online after the show for a live web chat.

If you can’t catch the show on tv, you can watch it online after the episode has aired and the live web chat will also be available to replay on the SBS website.

Don’t forget to check out the Extras section for additional interviews and exclusive scenes that weren’t shown in the tv broadcast!

3 Comments

Judith Hall 

Program totally got lost. He’s not a Marsh at all. He’s a Dutton.
So though ancestor was an adoptee of the Marsh family there’s absolutely no relation so that was only relevant in terms of storyline for the program.

I was interested to see where the Dutton line went as I have Dutton (Yorkshire) on my tree and would liked to have known more of where the mother’s line went. Rod was judging his Dutton ancestor, but better to just do the research and see where it goes. That might be much more interesting. Research never got off shore.

December 6, 2010 at 2:52 pm
Pam 

I do heartily sick of the constant focus on the paternal lines and the neglect of the maternal ones.

December 6, 2010 at 10:08 pm
Roslyn Hackshaw 

One thing that was not mentioned in the program, was that when convicts were transported to W.A. they had been phased out in the other states and no women were sent here. The reason the convict transportation scheme was started here was a critical shortage of labour. So instead of promoting a migration scheme they imported convicts.

December 7, 2010 at 11:24 am