Immigration in the 1600s

Posted by Crista Cowan on October 7, 2014 in Family History Month, Research

We probably all remember the little school room ditty about how, in 1492, Columbus sailed the ocean blue. Columbus was not the first and he would not be the last. Exploration of the New World had been happening for a while by then. It would continue for several more decades before the first permanent European… Read more

Ancestry Weekly Update: October 6th Edition

Posted by Anne Gillespie Mitchell on October 6, 2014 in Ask Ancestry Anne

Blog Posts Ancestry.com Five Mistakes to Avoid When Researching Your Family History  by Brian Gallagher What We Are Reading: October 3rd Edition by Amy Johnson Crow Throwback Thursday: Hairstyles and What We Endured to Get Them  by Juliana Szucs Smith World Famous Comedian Billy ‘The Big Yin’ Connolly is next on Who Do You Think… Read more

Five Mistakes to Avoid When Researching Your Family History

Posted by Brian Gallagher on October 5, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site, Family Trees, Research, Searching for Records, United Kingdom

We all make mistakes! The key to success in family history research, as in life, is to learn from them. In an effort to guide you through your genealogical journey, we have created this list containing the top five mistakes to avoid when researching your family tree. 1. Assuming a family name is only spelled… Read more

Between The Leaves: Your Migration Story

Posted by Jessica Murray on October 3, 2014 in Between the Leaves

In honor of Family History Month and our theme of “Migration Through the Centuries”, we asked our professional genealogists Amy Johnson Crow, Crista Cowan, Anne Gillespie Mitchell and Juliana Szucs to share their personal family migration story in our latest Between The Leaves episode. From ancestors that settled in the Massachusetts Colony to those who arrived… Read more

What We Are Reading: October 3rd Edition

Posted by Amy Johnson Crow on October 3, 2014 in In The Community

In many ways, family history is about finding what has been lost. The relationships, the stories, the struggles – the people who lived it knew those things, but that knowledge got lost somewhere between them and us. What we try to do now is to rediscover what they knew. We dig into the records and… Read more