Using WWI Registration Cards to trace your ancestors

Posted by Kristen Hyde on August 19, 2016 in Content, United Kingdom

Ancestry Content Acquisition Manager, Rhona Murray talks about the value of WWI registration cards in tracing your ancestors movements during this period. Start exploring our new WWI Registration Cards for Bexley on Ancestry. The first National Registration exercise in the United Kingdom was taken during the First World War. The National Registration Act came in Read More

How Science Solved a Romanian Mystery

Posted by Kristen Hyde on August 11, 2016 in AncestryDNA, Research, United Kingdom

Senior Manager of Content at Ancestry, Miriam Silverman, shares her experience researching her family history in Romania and how a DNA match repaired a broken branch of her family tree.  When you come from immigrant stock, it can be very difficult to trace your ancestry back very far. My dad’s dad came over to London as Read More

The Family Historian’s Holiday

Posted by Bryony Partridge on August 8, 2016 in AncestryDNA, United Kingdom

Across many parts of the UK and Ireland, the first two weeks of August are known as the ‘builders holidays’. This is a time when construction sites across the country shut down as builders and their families head for the beaches of Bognor or Bundoran. August is a time for holidays. Assuming your family haven’t Read More

Somerset to be bowled over by digitisation of millions of historical records

Posted by Bryony Partridge on July 14, 2016 in Ancestry.com Site, Collections, United Kingdom

A cricket legend, foreign secretary and Christmas card pioneer are among those you can find in our new Somerset collection which includes over seven million historical records containing centuries of details of Somerset residents. Digitised from original records held by the South West Heritage Trust, the collections hold details of births, deaths, marriages and school Read More

Remembering The Somme: 100 years on

Posted by Bryony Partridge on July 1, 2016 in United Kingdom

The Battle of the Somme began on 1 July, 1916 – the deadliest day in the history of the British Army. Around 20,000 British Empire soldiers lost their lives that day and it was just the beginning of a battle that would be become forever associated with the horrors of the First World War. Based Read More

Victorian Prisoners in Gloucester Gaol, 1815-1879

Posted by Bryony Partridge on June 17, 2016 in Ancestry.com Site, Content, United Kingdom

Liz Jack, author of A Rogue’s Gallery: Victorian Prisoners in Gloucester Gaol, explores the youngest and oldest prisoners to be incarcerated at Gloucestershire Gaol. To explore the Gloucestershire Gaol Registers 1815-1879, head to Ancestry.co.uk. In Victorian times, there was no distinction between children and adults when it came to custodial sentences. Some children as young Read More