The Great Migration: How to Find Your African-American Ancestors

Posted by Karin Berry on January 28, 2015 in Guest Bloggers, Research

This is a guest post by Karin Berry. During the Great Migration, 6 million African-Americans migrated to the North between 1910 to 1930. How can you trace their movement? It’s simple: Think like an immigrant. When the Great Migration, which occurred decades after slaves were freed, is approached as internal migration within the United States, it’s easy… Read more

Tracking the Service of a World War I Veteran for our UK Branch Out Winner

Posted by Brian Gallagher on January 24, 2015 in Ancestry.com Site, Contest, Guest Bloggers, Military Records, Research, Stories, United Kingdom

  By Neil Holden, AncestryProGenealogists Alan Small recently won our Branch Out Sweepstakes, and received 20 hours of research with AncestryProGenealogists. High on Alan’s list of interests were the experiences and movements of his grandfather, John James Collins, who served in the British military both before and during World War I. Our research provided detailed… Read more

The Obituary Is Just the Beginning of the Story

Posted by Ancestry Team on January 20, 2015 in Research

By Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Anne Gillespie Mitchell, Ancestry Genealogist Question: Can you provide me a copy of the obituary for Albert Allison Slingerland, who last lived in Sturgis, Michigan. He was the next-to-the-last Civil War veteran in that state. —Lyle There is a saying that there are no boring ancestors, just boring researchers. … Read more

South Dakota State Research Guide: More Than Mount Rushmore

Posted by Ancestry Team on January 16, 2015 in Research

  We are thrilled to announce with the publishing of this South Dakota guide we have completed a family history state research guide for each for the fifty U.S. states plus, Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico. You can download each of these research guides for free in our Ancestry Learning Center.   South Dakota is… Read more

North Dakota State Research Guide Available Now

Posted by Jessica Murray on January 12, 2015 in Ancestry.com Site, Research

The great state of North Dakota is next on our list of free state research guides we’re making available. The first European settlers to North Dakota arrived in the 18th century and were fur traders employed by the Missouri Fur company. Not long after, the settlements of Selkirk Colony, on the Red and Assiniboine rivers, and the Pembina… Read more

Massachusetts State Research Guide Now Available

Posted by Jessica Murray on December 30, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site, Research

With the long-standing history of Massachusetts, you can expect interesting and rich collections to assist your family history research. Here are five things you may not have known about Massachusetts: 1. Massachusetts was the sixth state to ratify the U.S. Constitution and be granted statehood. 2. Four United States Presidents were born in Massachusetts: John Adams,… Read more

Was Your Grandma A Fashion Maverick?

Posted by Betty Shubert on December 23, 2014 in Guest Bloggers, Research

How much do you know about your grandmother’s fashion sense? Hollywood costume designer Betty Kreisel Shubert, author of Out of Style, is considered the go-to vintage fashion expert. Betty received three unidentified photos of Denise Levenick’s grandmother, Arline Allen Kinsel, and was tasked with trying to determine the time/date of the photographs.     The Bolero… Read more

How to Find a Woman: Tracing Mottie Winters Through 1800s Kentucky

Posted by Ancestry Team on December 22, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site, Research

By Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Juliana Szucs, Family Historian for Ancestry I am new to Ancestry.com and I am hoping you can help me. My great-great-grandmother is S. Mottie Winters. She was born 22 January 1866, possibly in Tennessee, and died 18 May 1891 in Murray, Kentucky. She is listed on Find A Grave,… Read more

Welcome to Big Sky Country! New Montana Research Guide

Posted by Juliana Szucs on December 19, 2014 in Research

We’ve launched our latest free research guide for the great state of Montana. Here are five things you might not know about Montana. 1. When settlers began arriving in Montana in earnest in the 1860s and 1870s, popular routes were by steamboat up the Missouri River or on the Bozeman Trail, a spur off of… Read more

It’s the Evergreen State: Our New Washington Research Guide

Posted by Amy Johnson Crow on December 12, 2014 in Research

When you think of the state of Washington, what comes to mind? Trees, apples, a certain brand of coffee? There’s a lot more to the Evergreen State. Here are five things you might not know: Both the United States and England controlled the region until 1846. The world’s first salmon cannery opened on the lower… Read more