Over 100 Years of Canadian Yearbook Records are Now Online

Posted by Ancestry Team on July 21, 2015 in Canada, Content, Research

As kids across the country enjoy their break from the books this summer, we just released a collection of more than one million historical yearbook records (featuring more than 100,000 pages), helping shed light on Canadian high school and university attendees from years past. The Canada, Selected School Yearbooks, 1908-2010 collection contains 1,355,141 Canadian middle school,… Read more

Organizing and Preserving a Family Photo Collection

Posted by Denise May Levenick on July 17, 2015 in Research

This is a guest post by Denise May Levenick, The Family Curator Photographs are the treasures of any family history collection. Documents can verify kinship and share the details of everyday life, but photos allow us to see firsthand the same eyes or broad smile we inherited from our forebears. Organizing all those photos may… Read more

Americans Desire Explorers, Royalty, Mayflower Descendants and Military Heroes in Their Family Tree

Posted by Ancestry Team on July 14, 2015 in Celebrity, Cool Finds, Research

When researching their family history, Americans prefer to find ancestors who were explorers, royalty, Mayflower descendants, and veterans of the Revolutionary and Civil Wars. However, despite such aspirational wishes, Americans more often descend from World War II veterans, immigrants, and entrepreneurs and businessmen. The new findings are part of the second chapter in its Global… Read more

Working Girls

Posted by Mary Penner on July 9, 2015 in Research

In 1886, a highly-skilled San Francisco stenographer, earning a hefty salary of $75 a month, offered her opinion about the low wages for most women workers. We work cheaper than the men; that’s the reason why we are working ourselves into the men’s places. … When a girl goes out to the theater or anywhere… Read more

Two sisters kept and two brothers given away. Heart breaking stories on tonight’s Long Lost Family.

Posted by Brian Gallagher on July 1, 2015 in Long Lost Family, Research, Stories, United Kingdom

It’s the penultimate episode of Long Lost Family tonight and it promises to be an emotional one. The Long Lost Family team feature the stories of two sisters who were kept while their brothers were given up for adoption, a family split by the decision to give up a child fifty years ago, and a… Read more

True Tennis Royalty! Eugenie Bouchard’s Real-Life Regal Connections Revealed

Posted by Lesley Anderson on June 26, 2015 in Canada, Research

Canada’s tennis sweetheart Eugenie “Genie” Bouchard, who is looking to match her incredible run from Wimbledon 2014 at this year’s tournament, is named after Britain’s Princess Eugenie and – as we have found – has real life royal family connections. Genie’s  Bouchard – whose mother is known to be a royal fan who named each… Read more

Searching for Native American Ancestry? Take These Steps to Learn More.

Posted by Paula Stuart-Warren on June 9, 2015 in Research

This is a guest post by Paula Stuart Warren, CG℠, FMGS, FUGA Whether it’s a tradition handed down, a known close connection, or even if you are currently enrolled in a tribe, there are many rich resources for researching your Native American family history. The starting point No matter our background, we all need to… Read more

Newly digitised collection details the haunted drinking-holes of West Yorkshire in the United Kingdom

Posted by Brian Gallagher on May 14, 2015 in Collections, Content, Research, United Kingdom

The West Yorkshire Alehouse Licences Collection have been digitised for the first time and are exclusive to Ancestry   More than 75,000 historic alehouse records included in this newly digitised collection  Haunted boozers include The Fleece Inn in Elland – home to a headless horseman named Old Leathery Coit Other weird and wonderful pub names… Read more

How the sinking of The Lusitania & the battlefields of WWI took an immeasurable toll on one Irish family.

Posted by Brian Gallagher on May 7, 2015 in Guest Bloggers, Military Records, Research, Stories, United Kingdom

Authored by Richard Coplen and originally published in the Westmeath Examiner May 5th 2015. The Doyles: A Mullingar family fractured by the First World War The First World War was more destructive than any other war had ever been. It was the first genuinely global conflict, fought not just on the fields of France and Flanders,… Read more

Window through a Widow’s Pension

Posted by Ancestry Team on April 22, 2015 in Research

By Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Michelle Ercanbrack, Family Historian at Ancestry I cannot find how my grandfather Anthony Peter Hellmann came to the U.S. or where he lived before 1900. I have his enlistment in the Spanish-American War, and a 1900 census that lists his birthday as 1878 in Germany, and that he immigrated… Read more