5 Things About the Port of Boston

Posted by Juliana Smith on July 17, 2014 in Juliana's Corner, Research

Boston’s history as a port is long. Here are 5 things you might not know about the port of Boston. 1. Not that Popular Early On Despite deep colonial roots, for most years Boston was not the port of choice for immigrants. Even the more distant port of New Orleans drew more immigration from Europe… Read more

New State Research Guide: New Hampshire

Posted by Juliana Smith on July 11, 2014 in Research

This week we pay tribute to the great state of New Hampshire. Here are five things you might not  know about New Hampshire: 1. New Hampshire was the first of the colonies to declare its independence from England. In January 1776, it established an independent government and constitution. 2. The first potatoes planted in the… Read more

Do You Have a Search Strategy?

Posted by Juliana Smith on July 10, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site, Juliana's Corner, Research, Searching for Records, Site Features

As I write this, I’m getting ready for a trip to Utah. As a fairly frequent traveler, I know that to make the trip less stressful, I need lists. Lists are what keep me from wandering around the house searching for nothing in particular, grasping randomly for things I might need, and missing items I… Read more

Genealogy Roadtrip: Do You Brake For Cemeteries?

Posted by Anne Gillespie Mitchell on July 9, 2014 in Ask Ancestry Anne, Research

  This summer, you may venture out from behind your computer and into the sun to travel to the places that your ancestors lived and where they were buried. Cemeteries are great places to find information about your ancestors. Standing in front of the grave of those that have come before you can be a… Read more

There’s a Fire! Remain Calm!

Posted by Amy Johnson Crow on July 8, 2014 in Research

  Sooner or later, you’re likely to hear that dreaded phrase, “Sorry, but the courthouse burned and the records you’re looking for don’t exist.” (Variations include “there was a flood,” “there was an earthquake,” and “the records were absconded by aliens.” Ok, maybe not that last one.) When you hear that the records have been… Read more

Welcome to the Volunteer State: Tennessee State Research Guide

Posted by Anne Gillespie Mitchell on July 4, 2014 in Research

On June 1, 1796, Tennessee became the 16th State admitted to the Union. Five things you might not have known about Tennessee: Before Tennessee became a state, in 1784, part of what would become the state became the State of Franklin; Franklin dissolved in 1788. Shelby County has more horses per capita than any other… Read more

Finding Revolutionary War Patriots

Posted by Amy Johnson Crow on July 4, 2014 in Military Records, Research

John Trimble served his country while it was still fighting for its independence from England. His first enlistment was in February 1778 and was at Valley Forge. His job was “guarding the people from taking provision to the British in Philadelphia.” But when his two-month tour was over, his service was not. He enlisted again… Read more

Ask Ancestry Anne: Why Can’t I Find My World War II Veterans Records?

Posted by Anne Gillespie Mitchell on July 2, 2014 in Ask Ancestry Anne, Military Records, Research

A question we hear a lot is: “I’ve searched and searched, but I can’t find records of my grandfather’s service in WWII. Am I doing something wrong?” Same for WWI, Korean War and Vietnam War records. You probably aren’t doing anything wrong. There’s a good chance the records may still be private or they may… Read more

Welcome to the Gem State: Idaho State Research Guide

Posted by Anne Gillespie Mitchell on June 27, 2014 in Research

Idaho was admitted to the Union on July 3, 1890 as the 43rd state. Five things you might not have known about Idaho: State law forbids a citizen to give another citizen a box of candy weighing more than 50 pounds. Hell’s Canyon is the deepest gorge in America at around 1,500 feet. Idaho has… Read more

Five Things About the Port of San Francisco

Posted by Juliana Smith on June 21, 2014 in Juliana's Corner, Research

This week, we take our series on ports beyond New York to the West Coast with five things about the Port of San Francisco. 1. Overland Immigration With the advantage of a natural harbor, it’s interesting that some of the most notable immigration to San Francisco came overland. In 1776, Juan Bautista de Anza led… Read more