Welcome to the Cotton State! Alabama Research Guide

Posted by Anne Gillespie Mitchell on November 22, 2014 in Research

Sometimes known as the Cotton State, Alabama actually has no official nickname. Five things you may not have known about Alabama: Huntsville is known as the rocket capital of the world. Workers in Alabama built the rocket that put the first man on the moon. Sequoyah, a Alabama resident, created the Cherokee phonetic, written alphabet.… Read more

How Old Family Photos Can Be Easily Time-Dated By Fashions

Posted by Ancestry.com on November 18, 2014 in Guest Bloggers, Research

This is a guest post by Betty Kreisel Shubert. Shortly after I began writing my now award winning book, Out-of-Style: A Modern Perspective of How, Why and When Vintage Fashions Evolved, I met the late Caroline Rober, past president of the Southern California Chapter of the Association of Professional Genealogists. Caroline sent me a family picture… Read more

WWI Honour Roll – Guest post by Archivist Karyn Stuckey from the Institution of Mechanical Engineers

Posted by Brian Gallagher on November 17, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site, Guest Bloggers, In The Community, Military Records, Research, United Kingdom

Authored by Karyn Stuckey, Archivist at the Institution of Mechanical Engineers   After the guns had fallen silent, thoughts turned to how to honour the dead. Faced with the dilemma of how to commemorate the dead, many organisations created Honour Rolls or memorials. The Institution of Mechanical Engineers created an ornate board, recording the names… Read more

Researching Outside of the Five Civilized Tribes

Posted by Amy Johnson Crow on November 13, 2014 in Research

Some of the largest collections of Native American records are for the Five Civilized Tribes (Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, and Seminole). The reason is that these five tribes had the most regulated interaction with the federal government. That interaction created a lot of records. But what if your ancestor wasn’t a member of one of… Read more

The Indian Removal Act of 1830

Posted by Crista Cowan on November 12, 2014 in Research

Humanity has often wept over the fate of the aborigines of this country and philanthropy has long been busily employed in devising means to avert it, but its progress has never for a moment been arrested, and one by one have many powerful tribes disappeared from the earth. … But true philanthropy reconciles the mind… Read more

Remembering and Researching Vietnam-era Veterans

Posted by Ancestry.com on November 10, 2014 in Military Records, Research

This is a post by guest blogger Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CGSM. As researchers of Vietnam-era veterans, we are fortunate. We can often capture the first-person experiences and stories of the veteran. As researchers, we also face challenges. Many records for Vietnam-era veterans are closed to the general public. Here is some background and resources to… Read more

The Korean War, 1950—1953

Posted by Ancestry.com on November 8, 2014 in Military Records, Research

This is a post by guest blogger Debbie Mieszala, CGSM. Is it the Korean War? Or is it the Korean Conflict? Both names are seen in the United States. Some believe that conflict is appropriate because the U. S. never declared war. It has been called “The Forgotten War.” Ray Royce Deilke It was mid-October… Read more

World War I: The War to End All Wars

Posted by Juliana Szucs on November 7, 2014 in Military Records, Research

They called it the “Great War.” “The war to end all wars.” If only. The costs were great, both in terms of lives and in property. An estimated 9 million lives were lost on the battlefield and more than double that were wounded. As we entered the World War I centennial this year, it’s a… Read more

Is That Your Civil War Ancestor or Someone With the Same Name?

Posted by Amy Johnson Crow on November 6, 2014 in Military Records, Research

Whether you call it the Civil War, the War Between the States, the War of Secession, the War of Northern Aggression, or even “the Late Unpleasantness,” if you have ancestors who lived in the United States between 1861 and 1865, they were probably impacted in some way by the Civil War. Finding the Right Service… Read more

Researching Native American Ancestors: Context Is Key

Posted by Amy Johnson Crow on November 6, 2014 in Research

Taking clues from our ancestors – exploring where they lived, looking at when they lived there, pulling every bit of information from their records – is key to family history research. Nowhere is this more true than with Native American research. Often when someone hears from family members, “We have Native American ancestry,” they’ll take… Read more