Newly digitised collection details the haunted drinking-holes of West Yorkshire in the United Kingdom

Posted by Brian Gallagher on May 14, 2015 in Collections, Content, Research, United Kingdom

The West Yorkshire Alehouse Licences Collection have been digitised for the first time and are exclusive to Ancestry   More than 75,000 historic alehouse records included in this newly digitised collection  Haunted boozers include The Fleece Inn in Elland – home to a headless horseman named Old Leathery Coit Other weird and wonderful pub names… Read more

How the sinking of The Lusitania & the battlefields of WWI took an immeasurable toll on one Irish family.

Posted by Brian Gallagher on May 7, 2015 in Guest Bloggers, Military Records, Research, Stories, United Kingdom

Authored by Richard Coplen and originally published in the Westmeath Examiner May 5th 2015. The Doyles: A Mullingar family fractured by the First World War The First World War was more destructive than any other war had ever been. It was the first genuinely global conflict, fought not just on the fields of France and Flanders,… Read more

Window through a Widow’s Pension

Posted by Ancestry Team on April 22, 2015 in Research

By Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Michelle Ercanbrack, Family Historian at Ancestry I cannot find how my grandfather Anthony Peter Hellmann came to the U.S. or where he lived before 1900. I have his enlistment in the Spanish-American War, and a 1900 census that lists his birthday as 1878 in Germany, and that he immigrated… Read more

Exploring our DNA – Europe West

Posted by Mike Mulligan on April 10, 2015 in AncestryDNA, Guest Bloggers, Research, United Kingdom

Our Western European DNA When I was a child my grandmother used to tell me how her family descended from Black Forest Quakers who fled to Ireland to escape religious persecution in Germany in the 1700s. Like all the best family stories there was a kernel of truth, as I would later learn about my… Read more

The Interconnectedness of the Human Family

Posted by Ancestry Team on April 8, 2015 in AncestryDNA, Research

By Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Julie Granka, Ph.D., Population Geneticist for AncestryDNA I am taking part in the DNA test from Ancestry because it is going to be super exciting just to find out my ethnicity. Is there anything I can do that would help me locate possible living relatives? Thanks for your time!  … Read more

What does our DNA tell us about being Irish?

Posted by Mike Mulligan on March 16, 2015 in AncestryDNA, Research, United Kingdom

Saint Patrick’s Day is a time of year when those with Irish heritage around the world celebrate being Irish. With the launch of AncestryDNA in the UK & Ireland we have an opportunity to show a different view of Irishness using genetics. Using DNA With AncestryDNA, all customers receive a unique estimate of their ‘genetic… Read more

Restoring Slave Families Using USCT Pension Records

Posted by Linda Barnickel on February 27, 2015 in Ancestry.com Site, Research

Today, we are going to look at how pension records created after the Civil War can help identify and reconnect slave-era families and relationships in the South. This article will assume that you have already identified someone in your family who may have served in the U.S. Colored Troops (USCT), and that you already have… Read more

Finding Your Family History on the Printed Page

Posted by Ancestry Team on February 24, 2015 in Ancestry.com Site, Research

Finding Your Family History on the Printed Page By Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Lisa Elzey, Family Historian at Ancestry I am stuck finding more information about my grandfather, Leland Wright. From a 1930 U.S. Census I know he lived in Florida and was born in Ohio about 1883. Can you help me? – Edmund… Read more

Are You Looking For a Convict in Your Australian Family Tree?

Posted by Jeremy Palmer on February 21, 2015 in Australia, Collections, Guest Bloggers, Research

The founding of Australia as a penal colony for the transportation of convicts from Britain is of course well known. The First Fleet arrived in New South Wales on 26th January 1788 and over the following 80 years approximately 160,000 convicts were transported to various locations in the country to serve their sentence. In the… Read more

William Thomas Swift – Gloucestershire’s Answer to Samuel Pepys

Posted by Vicky Thorpe on February 18, 2015 in Collections, Guest Bloggers, Research, United Kingdom

Village schoolmaster, William Thomas Swift, wrote an entry in his diary every single day from 31 December 1859 when he was 18 years old until 5 February 1915, just a few days before his death.  His zest for life and interest in his fellow men shine through every entry and offer us a unique insight… Read more