Bring Your Ancestors to Life: Adding Context with Unique Ancestry Collections

Posted by Juliana Szucs on October 30, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site, Collections, Family History Month

Looking at a pedigree chart can be somewhat uninspiring to family members who haven’t yet been bitten with the genealogy bug. We know that those names and dates carry stories, but to really do them justice we need to add context. There are some fantastic resources available on Ancestry that can help us do just… Read more

Ten Free Data Collections to Get You Started With Your Family History

Posted by Anne Gillespie Mitchell on October 29, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site, Collections, Family History Month

Money a little tight?  Are you looking for a free way to get a relative hooked on family history? (Aren’t we all?) Creating trees on Ancestry is always free — you just need to register. Check out these free data collections to help fill in some branches: 1940 US Census: Find one ancestor in here and… Read more

Tips for Finding Your Ancestors in German Civil Registration Records on Ancestry

Posted by Juliana Szucs on October 27, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site, Collections

Ancestry has just launched more than 11.7 million new German records, the majority of which are birth, marriage, and death records. Initially, registrations of births, marriages, and deaths were kept by religious denominations, but a civil registry modeled on the French system was implemented on 1 October 1874 in Prussian provinces, and throughout the German… Read more

Titanic Captain among those listed as more than one million historic Liverpool crew lists are digitised by Ancestry

Posted by Brian Gallagher on October 24, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site, Collections, Content, United Kingdom

We are all familiar with the ill-fated maiden voyage of the RMS Titanic. On the night of the 14th of April 1912, 1,500 people lost their lives after the liner hit an iceberg and sank to the depths of the Atlantic Ocean. The captain on that tragic voyage was Edward Smith. Smith joined the White Star… Read more

Just in Time for Labor Day – Delaware, Winterthur Museum Craftperson Files, 1600-1995

Posted by Juliana Szucs on August 29, 2014 in Collections

Just in time for Labor Day, Ancestry has released a unique collection that relates directly to the occupations of those involved in various crafts, dating back to the 1600s in America - Delaware, Winterthur Museum Craftperson Files, 1600-1995. The Winterthur Library is devoted to the study of everyday life in America and America’s craft traditions, including… Read more

One Million World War I Heroes Forgotten by Descendants

Posted by Ancestry.com on July 29, 2014 in Collections, Military Records, United Kingdom

As we commemorate the World War I Centenary “1914 – 2014,” remember your forgotten heroes.   Three in 10 descendants of World War I heroes are unaware of their military heritage Many lose opportunity to learn of family link to Great War when relatives pass away Ancestry makes all WWI Medal Index Cards records free-to-use to… Read more

Six Things to Look for in City Directories

Posted by Juliana Szucs on July 29, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site, Collections, Content, Juliana's Corner, Research

City directories are incredible sources. In many cities, they were published annually, which can give us a lot of detail about our ancestors. Here are six things to look for in city directories. 1. Your Ancestor and Other Family Members Sure, you’re going to look for your ancestor, but look for other family members, too.… Read more

Special Delivery: Postmasters in the Family Tree

Posted by Amy Johnson Crow on July 26, 2014 in Collections

Happy Birthday to the U.S. Postal Service! (We would have sent them a card, but we couldn’t find one for a 239th birthday.) One great thing about having an ancestor who held a government job such as postmaster is that it creates a paper trail. A postmaster (which is the correct term for both males… Read more

New Sources for Black Sheep, Part 2: California Prison Records

Posted by Amy Johnson Crow on July 11, 2014 in Collections

Richard Perkins was born in Kentucky around 1845. As a young man, he answered the call of the West and headed to California to seek his fortune. Things didn’t go as he had planned, so he decided to take the alias of “Dick Fellows” and supplement his income by robbing stagecoaches. In 1870, he was… Read more

New Sources for Black Sheep, Part 1: New York Prison Records

Posted by Amy Johnson Crow on July 8, 2014 in Collections

“If you can’t get rid of the skeleton in your closet, you’d best teach it to dance.” Those words by George Bernard Shaw are a good reminder to those with black sheep in the family. (And who doesn’t have one or two of those?) Records created about the ne’er-do-wells of the family can be rich… Read more