SSDI’s New Companion: U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007

Posted by Juliana Szucs on July 24, 2015 in Ancestry.com Site, Collections

The Social Security Death Index (SSDI) was among the first collections posted on Ancestry when the website first began adding content back in 1996. Since then, it has been a boon to researchers looking for 20th-century ancestors and those doing descendancy, heirship, and other types of forensic genealogical research. Once you locate an ancestor in the… Read more

Over 11,000 Historic Surrey Mental Hospital Admission Records Published on Ancestry

Posted by Brian Gallagher on June 4, 2015 in Collections, Content, United Kingdom

   Records detail thousands of people placed in Surrey mental health institutions over a 33-year period Children as young as four and adults up to age 93 are listed in the collection Collection is key for people looking to find out more about the circumstances surrounding ancestors with mental health diagnoses     Over 11,000 historic… Read more

Records from the Jersey Archive in the Channel Islands go online for the first time.

Posted by Brian Gallagher on May 22, 2015 in Collections, Content, United Kingdom

  We are very excited to bring you two new collections as part of our web search initiative. The Jersey, Channel Islands, Wills and Testaments collection covering the years 1663-1948 and The Jersey, Channel Islands, Occupation Registration Cards from World War Two covering the years 1940-1945. Both these collections will be of enormous benefit to… Read more

Newly digitised collection details the haunted drinking-holes of West Yorkshire in the United Kingdom

Posted by Brian Gallagher on May 14, 2015 in Collections, Content, Research, United Kingdom

The West Yorkshire Alehouse Licences Collection have been digitised for the first time and are exclusive to Ancestry   More than 75,000 historic alehouse records included in this newly digitised collection  Haunted boozers include The Fleece Inn in Elland – home to a headless horseman named Old Leathery Coit Other weird and wonderful pub names… Read more

Seeing Pre- and Post-WWI Britain via Ordnance Survey Maps

Posted by Juliana Szucs on May 6, 2015 in Ancestry.com Site, Collections

One of the best things about family history is that it is constantly taking you to new places and times. Even if your ancestors stayed put for generations, the places where they lived changed and evolved through the years. Knowing your ancestor’s surroundings can be critical to your research in terms of locating new records. Where… Read more

Reports from Gallipoli, The Dardanelles and The Western Front: WWI Military Diaries go Online

Posted by Brian Gallagher on April 22, 2015 in Australia, Collections, Content, United Kingdom

More than 1.5 million pages of first-hand diary accounts of WWI military operations are now available to read online. Published today, from records held at The National Archives in Kew, the UK, WWI War Diaries 1914-1920 document operations by British and colonial units serving in France, Belgium, Germany, Gallipoli and the Dardanelles over a six… Read more

North Carolina County Marriage Records

Posted by Anne Gillespie Mitchell on April 1, 2015 in Collections

Do you have North Carolina ancestors?  Well you may need to take a day off from work or tell your family you simply aren’t available. Ancestry has launched North Carolina, Marriage Records, 1741-2011 and this data collection includes images of marriage bonds, licenses, certificates, and registers from 87 different counties. On the data collection page,… Read more

Are You Looking For a Convict in Your Australian Family Tree?

Posted by Jeremy Palmer on February 21, 2015 in Australia, Collections, Guest Bloggers, Research

The founding of Australia as a penal colony for the transportation of convicts from Britain is of course well known. The First Fleet arrived in New South Wales on 26th January 1788 and over the following 80 years approximately 160,000 convicts were transported to various locations in the country to serve their sentence. In the… Read more

William Thomas Swift – Gloucestershire’s Answer to Samuel Pepys

Posted by Vicky Thorpe on February 18, 2015 in Collections, Guest Bloggers, Research, United Kingdom

Village schoolmaster, William Thomas Swift, wrote an entry in his diary every single day from 31 December 1859 when he was 18 years old until 5 February 1915, just a few days before his death.  His zest for life and interest in his fellow men shine through every entry and offer us a unique insight… Read more

American Indian Research in the 1800s

Posted by Paul Rawlins on November 10, 2014 in Collections

In 19th-century America, the eyes of the country were looking west. The Louisiana Purchase, annexation of Texas, Mexican-American War, resolving of the Oregon boundary dispute, California gold rush, Homestead Act, and transcontinental railroad all contributed to opening more of the American continent to white settlement. This westward expansion also spelled the end of the life… Read more