One Million World War I Heroes Forgotten by Descendants

Posted by Ancestry.com on July 29, 2014 in Collections, Military Records, United Kingdom

As we commemorate the World War I Centenary “1914 – 2014,” remember your forgotten heroes.   Three in 10 descendants of World War I heroes are unaware of their military heritage Many lose opportunity to learn of family link to Great War when relatives pass away Ancestry makes all WWI Medal Index Cards records free-to-use to… Read more

Six Things to Look for in City Directories

Posted by Juliana Smith on July 29, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site, Collections, Content, Juliana's Corner, Research

City directories are incredible sources. In many cities, they were published annually, which can give us a lot of detail about our ancestors. Here are six things to look for in city directories. 1. Your Ancestor and Other Family Members Sure, you’re going to look for your ancestor, but look for other family members, too.… Read more

Special Delivery: Postmasters in the Family Tree

Posted by Amy Johnson Crow on July 26, 2014 in Collections

Happy Birthday to the U.S. Postal Service! (We would have sent them a card, but we couldn’t find one for a 239th birthday.) One great thing about having an ancestor who held a government job such as postmaster is that it creates a paper trail. A postmaster (which is the correct term for both males… Read more

New Sources for Black Sheep, Part 2: California Prison Records

Posted by Amy Johnson Crow on July 11, 2014 in Collections

Richard Perkins was born in Kentucky around 1845. As a young man, he answered the call of the West and headed to California to seek his fortune. Things didn’t go as he had planned, so he decided to take the alias of “Dick Fellows” and supplement his income by robbing stagecoaches. In 1870, he was… Read more

New Sources for Black Sheep, Part 1: New York Prison Records

Posted by Amy Johnson Crow on July 8, 2014 in Collections

“If you can’t get rid of the skeleton in your closet, you’d best teach it to dance.” Those words by George Bernard Shaw are a good reminder to those with black sheep in the family. (And who doesn’t have one or two of those?) Records created about the ne’er-do-wells of the family can be rich… Read more

Historic Victorian Atlas Published Online

Posted by Ancestry.com on June 20, 2014 in Collections

  Newly digitised, navigable atlas collection details 500 years of British history:    Victorian atlas reveals the shifting shape of Britain’s landscape over the last 500 years Collection of 57 maps shows England’s lost counties such as Westmorland and Huntingdonshire  Parish borders reminiscent of time when people associated more with their church than town hall… Read more

New Puerto Rico Records and Research Guides

Posted by Amy Johnson Crow on June 9, 2014 in Collections, Research

We’ve just launched a new collection with more than 5 million vital records from Puerto Rico. Civil registration began in Puerto Rico in 1885, and the records can contain rich details, sometimes even mentioning several generations. For example, a birth record might list the names of the child, parents, and grandparents. Before you start researching… Read more

Gonna Lay This Body Down: Quaker Funerals & Burials

Posted by Lisa Arnold on June 7, 2014 in Collections

Have you ever seen a Quaker Burying Ground?  They are the epitome of simplicity and serenity. The stones are all small (the reason for which is described below) and non-Quaker names appear here and there. Names of slaves and Indians – not your typical church cemetery you must admit! Knowing more about Quaker burials will… Read more

Going to the Chapel and We’re Gonna Get Married. No Preacher Required

Posted by Lisa Arnold on June 1, 2014 in Collections

A Quaker marriage usually took place under the care of the bride’s meeting (congregation), either in the meeting house or in her home. There was no clergyman marrying the couple; rather, they offered themselves in marriage and made promises to each other, under the care of the meeting. The marriage certificate was hand-lettered on large… Read more

Watt Geniuses – Historical Electrical Engineering Records from Institution of Engineering and Technology

Posted by Ancestry.com on May 30, 2014 in Collections, United Kingdom

More than 170,000 electrical engineer records are published online today – shedding light on some of history’s ‘brightest sparks’. Digitised by Ancestry the UK Electrical Engineer Records 1871-1930* includes members of the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) across the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The IET was originally founded in 1871 as the… Read more