Ask Ancestry Anne: How Do I Share All The Great Finds I’ve Made?

Posted by Anne Gillespie Mitchell on May 7, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site, Ask Ancestry Anne

Question: We’ve found a couple of potential cousins and would like to share our family tree.  We’d like to know how to do this. Many thanks, Allan Davidson Answer:  Great question!  Sharing your tree, either private or public, with relatives who are not on Ancestry.com allows you to share your finds and maybe it will… Read more

What You Might Have Missed: May 5th Edition

Posted by Anne Gillespie Mitchell on May 5, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site

Blog Posts Ancestry.com New Quaker Records Tell the Stories of Our Nation’s “Friends” This Week and Always, We Remember by Juliana Smith Tattoos, Pigeon Theft and Financial Fraud: Introducing The West Yorkshire Collection AncestryDNA Database Exceeds 400,000 Genotyped Members by Anna Swayne Let Me Call Thee Sweetheart by Lisa Arnold It’s International Worker’s Day: How… Read more

With Polish Pride: Celebrating Constitution Day

Posted by Juliana Smith on May 3, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site, Juliana's Corner

The other day marked my paternal grandmother’s 108th birthday and although she’s been gone nearly 18 years, I still miss her dearly. I can remember sitting and listening to her tell me about the trips she’d gone on and the days of her youth when she and Grandpa won dance contests in Cleveland. I especially… Read more

Don’t Let Mold Destroy Your Family History

Posted by Nancy Kraft on May 2, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site

Mold is a four-letter word. It can destroy your documents and it can make you sick. What do you do when you discover that great-grandpa’s Civil War letters or the family Bible has mold on it? Here are some tips to help you when you discover mold. First, Protect Yourself You can’t tell who will… Read more

It’s International Worker’s Day: How Did Your Ancestors Make a Living?

Posted by Lou Szucs on May 1, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site, Content, Research

May 1st is set aside in 80 countries as International Worker’s Day – a day to celebrate labor and working people. And this day serves as a reminder of how our ancestors toiled to put food on their tables and roofs over their families’ heads.  Whether your ancestor was a homemaker, a farmer, a factory… Read more

Probate in the United Kingdom: An Overview

Posted by Abbie Lee Black on April 18, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site, Research

After finding your ancestors in civil registration, census records, and parish registers, there are many different record types that are widely available for the UK. When I’m doing research, I usually look for probate records, and specifically wills, of my ancestors at this stage in the research process.   UK Wills and Probate Before 1858… Read more

Tattoos: Signs of an “Interesting Past”

Posted by Juliana Smith on April 17, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site, Collections, Content, Juliana's Corner, Research, Social Media, Stories

Jack London is quoted as saying, “Show me a man with a tattoo and I’ll show you a man with an interesting past.” My great-great-grandfather, Thomas Howley, was certainly no exception. In 1864, he joined the U.S. Navy under an assumed name so his wife wouldn’t find out. (She found out. She was not happy.)… Read more

Paying Taxes… Or Not

Posted by Amy Johnson Crow on April 15, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site, Collections

They say that the only things certain in life are death and taxes. Genealogists are used to dealing with records surrounding an ancestor’s death, but what about taxes? Tax Basics Tax records in many locations date back earlier than vital records. They’re great for our research because they tend to be kept on a regular… Read more

Research in the Old Line State: Maryland State Guide

Posted by Amy Johnson Crow on April 11, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site

Many of us (myself included) can trace our roots back to Maryland. The history we can find there is fascinating, both in terms of our families’ and the state’s. Maryland can be described as a land of contradictions. It was founded in part to be a safe haven for Catholics from England who wanted to… Read more

Use England Parish Registers To Research Ancestors Pre-1837

Posted by Abbie Lee Black on April 11, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site, Research

Continuing on with my previous post, civil registration and census records are usually the place I turn first when starting my research in the UK. These records can be used together to create an accurate snapshot of a family group in the mid-19th century to late 20th century. Before 1837, parish registers are most commonly… Read more