WDYTYA Recap: Sean Hayes Finds Order in Petty Session Court Records

Posted by Ancestry Team on March 30, 2015 in Ancestry.com Site, Who Do You Think You Are?

Trouble seemed to follow Sean Hayes’ ancestors down generations and even over an ocean. But trouble, especially when it led to clashes with the law, became a lynchpin in uncovering Sean’s story. Researching ancestors in Ireland has always required some creativity due to the loss of 19th-century census returns. Censuses are a staple in U.S.… Read more

Women Soldiers in the Civil War: How Did They Get Away With It?

Posted by Becky Hepinstall on March 26, 2015 in Ancestry.com Site

Elizabeth Finnern’s gravestone sits in a tranquil cemetery in Indiana. Just a simple stone, marking a quiet spot where a husband and wife rest for eternity. But there is something quite unique about this particular headstone – the last line: “Both members of Co. D. 81 Reg. O.V.I.” and underneath, the explanation: “She served in… Read more

The Legend of Harvey Setzer

Posted by Ancestry Team on March 24, 2015 in Ancestry.com Site

By Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Paul Rawlins, Editorial Manager at Ancestry My grandfather’s sister, Lillian Wilson, married a man by the name of Harvey G. Setzer in Weippe, Idaho, Shoshone County, on July 3, 1890. Harvey was a miner and contracted consumption. The doctor prescribed a warmer, drier climate so they moved to Valle… Read more

Who Do You Think You Are? Recap: What’s in a Name?

Posted by Ancestry Team on March 23, 2015 in Ancestry.com Site

We like to think Shakespeare was channeling his inner family historian when he penned the famous line “What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.” Talk to any expert genealogist and they will tell you that relying on an ancestor’s name alone can be a… Read more

Become Fluent in Irish Slang

Posted by Jessica Murray on March 12, 2015 in Ancestry.com Site

With St. Patrick’s Day just around the corner, most hometown St. Patrick’s Day parades and festivals will kick off this weekend. If you’re looking to beef up on your Irish slang, look no further than our list of words used throughout Ireland and their meanings. Word Meaning Bad dose bad illness Bag of taytos bag… Read more

Plan Ahead: Protect Your Genealogy from Disaster

Posted by Denise May Levenick on March 11, 2015 in Ancestry.com Site

With spring floods and hurricane season just around the corner, a recent episode of Genealogy Roadshow shared a story with a timely reminder for “genealogy preparedness.”  New Orleans resident Andrew Sentilles came to the the New Orleans Board of Trade Episode of the PBS Genealogy Roadshows how looking for help to recreate the family history he lost when… Read more

Was Your Great-Great-Grandmother a Civil War Soldier?

Posted by Becky Hepinstall on March 10, 2015 in Ancestry.com Site

It’s an old daguerreotype, faded now with time and passed down through many generations. A sweet-faced young woman looks back at you, her mouth upturned gently and eyes seeming to look into yours. It’s the face of your great-great-grandmother, who lived through the Civil War. Perhaps you’ve wondered how she coped when her husband, brother,… Read more

Leaving a Legacy: Wilma Pearl Mankiller

Posted by Jessica Murray on March 8, 2015 in Ancestry.com Site

Wilma Pearl Mankiller has a unique story and background, unlike any other woman featured in our Leaving a Legacy series. Born  in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, Wilma Pearl Mankiller descended from a long line of full-blooded Cherokee Indians on her paternal side, and had Dutch and Irish ancestry on her maternal side. Mankiller lived in Oklahoma through her… Read more

Leaving a Legacy – Cornelia Clark Fort

Posted by Jessica Murray on March 6, 2015 in Ancestry.com Site

Cornelia Clark Fort’s Life “I am grateful that my one talent, flying, was useful to my country.” – Cornelia Fort As the first American pilot to encounter the Japanese air fleet during the attack on Pearl Harbor, Cornelia Fort made history for women aviators across the globe. Cornelia was born into an affluent family in Nashville,… Read more

Using the Swedish Household Clerical Exams

Posted by Juliana Szucs on March 4, 2015 in Ancestry.com Site

Ancestry just updated the collection of Sweden, Selected Indexed Household Clerical Surveys, 1880-1893, adding records from  Jönköping, Malmöhus, Östergötlands and Skaraborgs. (Records for Älvsborg, Kalmar, and Värmland and a few from Göteborg och Bohus, Kronoberg, and Östergötland have been available since December 2014.) Household examination rolls make up the main church register in Sweden. In them, everyone… Read more