Become Fluent in Irish Slang

Posted by Jessica Murray on March 12, 2015 in Ancestry.com Site

With St. Patrick’s Day just around the corner, most hometown St. Patrick’s Day parades and festivals will kick off this weekend. If you’re looking to beef up on your Irish slang, look no further than our list of words used throughout Ireland and their meanings. Word Meaning Bad dose bad illness Bag of taytos bag… Read more

Plan Ahead: Protect Your Genealogy from Disaster

Posted by Denise May Levenick on March 11, 2015 in Ancestry.com Site

With spring floods and hurricane season just around the corner, a recent episode of Genealogy Roadshow shared a story with a timely reminder for “genealogy preparedness.”  New Orleans resident Andrew Sentilles came to the the New Orleans Board of Trade Episode of the PBS Genealogy Roadshows how looking for help to recreate the family history he lost when… Read more

Was Your Great-Great-Grandmother a Civil War Soldier?

Posted by Becky Hepinstall on March 10, 2015 in Ancestry.com Site

It’s an old daguerreotype, faded now with time and passed down through many generations. A sweet-faced young woman looks back at you, her mouth upturned gently and eyes seeming to look into yours. It’s the face of your great-great-grandmother, who lived through the Civil War. Perhaps you’ve wondered how she coped when her husband, brother,… Read more

Leaving a Legacy: Wilma Pearl Mankiller

Posted by Jessica Murray on March 8, 2015 in Ancestry.com Site

Wilma Pearl Mankiller has a unique story and background, unlike any other woman featured in our Leaving a Legacy series. Born  in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, Wilma Pearl Mankiller descended from a long line of full-blooded Cherokee Indians on her paternal side, and had Dutch and Irish ancestry on her maternal side. Mankiller lived in Oklahoma through her… Read more

Leaving a Legacy – Cornelia Clark Fort

Posted by Jessica Murray on March 6, 2015 in Ancestry.com Site

Cornelia Clark Fort’s Life “I am grateful that my one talent, flying, was useful to my country.” – Cornelia Fort As the first American pilot to encounter the Japanese air fleet during the attack on Pearl Harbor, Cornelia Fort made history for women aviators across the globe. Cornelia was born into an affluent family in Nashville,… Read more

Using the Swedish Household Clerical Exams

Posted by Juliana Szucs on March 4, 2015 in Ancestry.com Site

Ancestry just updated the collection of Sweden, Selected Indexed Household Clerical Surveys, 1880-1893, adding records from  Jönköping, Malmöhus, Östergötlands and Skaraborgs. (Records for Älvsborg, Kalmar, and Värmland and a few from Göteborg och Bohus, Kronoberg, and Östergötland have been available since December 2014.) Household examination rolls make up the main church register in Sweden. In them, everyone… Read more

Leaving a Legacy: Madam C.J. Walker

Posted by Juliana Szucs on March 3, 2015 in Ancestry.com Site

Madam C. J. Walker was born Sarah Breedlove to Owen and Minerva (née Anderson) Breedlove, former slaves on a plantation owned by Robert W. Burney. Sarah was the first child of the couple born after the Civil War in 1867. In 1863, the Union Army had occupied the area during the siege of Vicksburg.  On… Read more

Rich Finds in Freedman’s Bank Records, 1865-1874

Posted by Juliana Szucs on March 2, 2015 in Ancestry.com Site

The year 1865 found many African American Civil War veterans and ex- slaves with money in their pockets and there was a need for an institution where they could save that money. The Freedman’s Savings and Trust Company (often referred to as the Freedman’s Bank) was incorporated 150 years ago on 03 March 1865 to… Read more

Restoring Slave Families Using USCT Pension Records

Posted by Linda Barnickel on February 27, 2015 in Ancestry.com Site, Research

Today, we are going to look at how pension records created after the Civil War can help identify and reconnect slave-era families and relationships in the South. This article will assume that you have already identified someone in your family who may have served in the U.S. Colored Troops (USCT), and that you already have… Read more

Leaving a Legacy: Ada Lovelace

Posted by Anne Gillespie Mitchell on February 25, 2015 in Ancestry.com Site

You may have recently watched the Imitation Game and learned about Alan Turing’s efforts to defeat the Nazis with his ingenious computer work.  But do you know who is credited with creating the first computer program?  Would you have guessed an English Countess? Augusta Ada King, Countess of Lovelace, born 1815 and died 1852 in… Read more