Family history and the search for identity

Posted by Bryony Partridge on July 19, 2016 in Website

Jerome de Groot teaches and researches at the University of Manchester. He writes about genealogy, popular history and public history. He has published several books including Consuming History (Routledge, 2016). You can follow him on Twitter at @deggy21. How does the past affect you in the present? Questions about our identity, our personalities, and our Read More

If Girls Are Sugar and Spice, Why Do We Keep Looking for Boys?

Posted by janabroglin on July 14, 2016 in Website

This post originally appeared in Ancestry Magazine, March-April 2007. By Jana Sloan Broglin, CG One day, when she was eight years old, my grandmother Louie (Kennedy) Beard and her sisters Meredith, Theone, and Nettie decided to make pancakes for breakfast. Each girl made their own, not sharing with anyone; Meredith was particularly adamant about this. Read More

Somerset to be bowled over by digitisation of millions of historical records

Posted by Bryony Partridge on July 14, 2016 in Collections, United Kingdom, Website

A cricket legend, foreign secretary and Christmas card pioneer are among those you can find in our new Somerset collection which includes over seven million historical records containing centuries of details of Somerset residents. Digitised from original records held by the South West Heritage Trust, the collections hold details of births, deaths, marriages and school Read More

Generation Next

Posted by Paul Rawlins on July 12, 2016 in Website

This article originally appeared in Ancestry Magazine, March-April 2007. When I ask members of the local scout troop if anybody has his Genealogy Merit Badge, I get groans and complaints. “Dude, that took so long” seems to be the general consensus. But when I ask what they found out, the tone changes. Riley learned how Read More

Ancestry Product Update: LifeStory Changes

Posted by Ancestry Team on July 8, 2016 in Site Features, Website

We introduced LifeStory last year to give you a better sense of what your ancestors’ lives were like. The auto-generated LifeStory does a lot of heavy lifting when translating facts and dates into a narrative of someone’s life but it really shines when you make it your own. From the beginning, you’ve had full control Read More

How to Find the Collections for Your Area

Posted by Amy Johnson Crow on July 6, 2016 in Website

There’s something about browsing that can help spark inspiration for our research. It’s like when you walk through the stacks at your favorite library when you have a general idea of what you want, but nothing specific comes to mind. Suddenly, you see it – the book that makes you stop and say, “I need Read More

Collaboration in World War II Research

Posted by Jennifer Holik on June 29, 2016 in Collections

Most of us have heard that two heads are better than one. This is especially true with World War II research. Just as with any genealogical research, one person does not know everything. One database or record repository does not have all the records or the entire story. Working together, collaborating, through different avenues, we Read More

Breathtaking Historic Photographs Digitized to Bring Canada’s Past To Life

Posted by Ancestry Team on June 28, 2016 in Canada, Collections

A collection of more than 3,000 historic photographs of Canada, spanning 25 years from post-Confederation to the First World War, have been published online for the first time. The photographs are part of two new historic Canadian collections made available on Ancestry, to celebrate Canada Day. The first collection, Canada, Photographic Albums of Settlement (1892-1917), include thousands Read More

Victorian Prisoners in Gloucester Gaol, 1815-1879

Posted by Bryony Partridge on June 17, 2016 in Collections, United Kingdom, Website

Liz Jack, author of A Rogue’s Gallery: Victorian Prisoners in Gloucester Gaol, explores the youngest and oldest prisoners to be incarcerated at Gloucestershire Gaol. To explore the Gloucestershire Gaol Registers 1815-1879, head to In Victorian times, there was no distinction between children and adults when it came to custodial sentences. Some children as young Read More