Who Will You Discover In New York?

Posted by Crista Cowan on June 6, 2012 in Content

On a spring day in 1940, census taker Joseph D Donohue walked into a Manhattan neighborhood to begin his official enumeration for the 1940 U.S. Federal Census. Did he know beforehand that he would be knocking on the doors of some of the most famous people of his time to ask them some very personal… Read more

New York 1940 – Now Search by Name

Posted by Jeanie Croasmun on June 5, 2012 in Ancestry.com Site, Content

13.5 million people lived in New York in 1940. And you can search for any one of them now by name in the just-launched 1940 U.S. Federal Census index for the Empire State on Ancestry.com. New York was the country’s biggest state in 1940 and its census pages are filled with fascinating folks. We’ve already… Read more

The Few. The Proud. The Marine Corps Muster Rolls.

Posted by Crista Cowan on May 24, 2012 in Ancestry.com Site, Content

In 1775 a committee of the Continental Congress met at the Tun Tavern in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  They issued a resolution that called for two battalions of men to fight for independence at sea and on shore.  Thus, on 10 November 1775, the Marine Corps was born.  Since then, the Marines have fought in major and… Read more

1940 Census: Add D.C. to That Index List

Posted by Jeanie Croasmun on April 26, 2012 in Ancestry.com Site, Content

Last night we launched another indexed location, this time the District of Columbia. And you can find some amazing people in it. First, you’ll find the likely suspects – like President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and J. Edgar Hoover. Plus interesting tots including a one-year-old Marvin Gaye. With the addition of the District of Columbia, we… Read more

1940: Why There’s Nevada and Delaware But No Other Indexes … Yet

Posted by Jeanie Croasmun on April 19, 2012 in Content

It’s our number one question on the blog, to our member services agents, on Facebook, everywhere: Why can’t I search by name in my ancestor’s state in the 1940 census yet? Seems like we should have an easy answer for it, and we do – because it takes time. But that answer resonates about as… Read more

U.S. City Directories: One Database, a Billion Records, and a Lot of Answers

Posted by Paul Rawlins on April 19, 2012 in Content

If you’re like me, the 1940 census was full of surprises—like my own parents not living where they were supposed to be living. Enter U.S. City Directories, 1821-1989 (Beta). We’ve had city directories on the site for years. They can be a great source for names, addresses, and occupations. They’re printed more often than censuses.… Read more

Setting Sail Into The Unknown

Posted by Crista Cowan on April 10, 2012 in Content

One hundred years ago today the Titanic set out on her maiden voyage amid much fanfare.  So much has been written and produced about that fateful voyage that anything I try to write sounds like so much cliché.  But I have been thinking about the trips my own ancestors took as they immigrated to America.… Read more

1940 Census – All images and our first two indexed states now online

Posted by Jeanie Croasmun on April 9, 2012 in Ancestry.com Site, Content

What a difference a week makes. Since the National Archives released the 1940 Census to us last Monday, we’ve been hard at work to get every one of the 3.8 million 1940 Census images online. And while we were at it, we indexed two of the states, Nevada and Delaware, and made them searchable by… Read more

Got Massachusetts Ancestors?

Posted by Crista Cowan on March 20, 2012 in Content

Have you seen what we did? The announcement went out this morning about a new collection of vital records now available online. The Massachusetts, Town Vital Collections contains over 8.2 million records covering over 360 years. Wow! After searching town records for their own relatives, Jay and DeLene Holbrook, realized that the majority of towns… Read more

Get Around the Missing 1890 Census

Posted by Crista Cowan on March 13, 2012 in Content, Research Helps, Searching for Records, Site Features

For those of you who are new to genealogy, you may be wondering why you haven’t received any hints leading you to 1890 census records for the people in your family tree.  Here’s the story.  The 1890 U.S. Federal Census was stored in the Commerce Building in Washington D.C.  In 1921 there was a fire… Read more