Ancestry.com
About
Julie has been a population geneticist at AncestryDNA since May 2013. Before that, Julie received her Ph.D. in Biology and M.S. in Statistics from Stanford University, where she studied genetic data from human populations and developed computational tools to answer questions about population history and evolution. She also spent time collecting and studying DNA using spit-collection tubes like the ones in an AncestryDNA kit. Julie likes to spend her non-computer time enjoying the outdoors – hiking, biking, running, swimming, camping, and picnicking. But if she’s inside, she’s baking, drawing, and painting.

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A Genetic Census of America

Posted on April 4, 2014 in AncestryDNA

Using AncestryDNA results from over a quarter million people, the AncestryDNA science team set out to perform a “genetic census” of the United States: a survey of the U.S. using only DNA. Where did the ancestors of today’s Americans come from? Do Americans in the Midwest hail from similar places of the world as in the… Read more

What Do Boston, Philadelphia, and Pittsburgh Have in Common?

Posted on March 14, 2014 in AncestryDNA, Holidays

At AncestryDNA, we’re celebrating Saint Patrick’s Day a little differently than most. We’re exploring how we can use genetics to study Irish heritage in the U.S. Throughout our nation’s history, millions of individuals from Ireland planted new roots here in the United States. While hundreds of thousands of Irish immigrants arrived in the 1600’s and 1700’s,… Read more

Clovis Boy: DNA Unraveled

Posted on February 26, 2014 in AncestryDNA

Who were the first people to ever inhabit the Americas? In sequencing the DNA of the remains of a boy from an ancient burial site in Montana, scientists from the University of Copenhagen have provided more evidence that the first humans to arrive in the Americas were originally from Northeast Asia.  Until now, evidence of… Read more

An Atlas of the Mixing of Human Populations

Posted on February 19, 2014 in AncestryDNA

Written records have detailed the varied histories of human groups over the past few thousand years.  While some groups remained isolated, other groups spread far and wide across the globe.  When they did, they encountered and “mixed” with other human groups – mixing both their people and their DNA.  That history has left its signature… Read more

Sima de los Huesos Produces Another DNA Gem

Posted on December 6, 2013 in AncestryDNA

Although your family tree on Ancestry.com doesn’t go back hundreds of thousands of years, the family tree that links us to our ancient human ancestors does. Scientists recently sequenced the DNA from a bone of a long-lost relative of ours — a human species who lived (and died) 400,000 years ago in a cave in Spain.… Read more

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Here you will find informational, and sometimes fun, posts from the folks behind the scenes here at Ancestry.com. We hope you’ll notice just how passionate we are about family history and about the products we’re building to help connect families over distance and time.

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