Ancestry Blog » Anne Gillespie Mitchell http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry The official blog of Ancestry Mon, 26 Jan 2015 14:58:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.5.2 Ask Ancestry Anne: How Do You Get Kids Involved in Genealogy?http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2015/01/05/ask-ancestry-anne-how-do-you-get-kids-involved-in-genealogy/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=ask-ancestry-anne-how-do-you-get-kids-involved-in-genealogy http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2015/01/05/ask-ancestry-anne-how-do-you-get-kids-involved-in-genealogy/#comments Mon, 05 Jan 2015 17:27:16 +0000 Anne Gillespie Mitchell http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=22970 Read more]]> Looking for new ways to get the children in your life involved in genealogy?  Are you a Civil War buff?  Or better yet, both?  If so, you might want to check out the Journey Through Hallowed Ground (JTHG) program.

Over 600,000 thousand soldiers died during the Civil War and this inventive program is planting a tree for each and every one of them by working with schools and students.

jthg1Each tree in the this program will be geo-tagged, which will allow visitors to check the website and mobile app to learn exactly where a soldier’s tree is and learn about the soldier it commemorates. The website and mobile app links to the soldier’s memorial page on Fold3. These memorial pages have basic facts about the soldier and users can upload additional information, documents, and photographs.

You can find Fold3 Memorial Pages such as this one for William Nanney who died August 2, 1862 in Petersburg, Virginia. You can also look up the location of his tree on the Living Legacy Map.jthg2

JTHG, Ancestry, and Fold3 are working with teachers to help them incorporate researching the lives of the Civil War fallen into their curriculum. For more information about this program, visit the Journey Through Hallowed Ground website.  If you are interested in learning more about a grant for Ancestry and Fold3 in your favorite child’s classroom, visit our Ancestry K12 site.

 

 

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Welcome to the First State! Delaware State Research Guidehttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/12/26/welcome-to-the-first-state-delaware-state-research-guide/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=welcome-to-the-first-state-delaware-state-research-guide http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/12/26/welcome-to-the-first-state-delaware-state-research-guide/#comments Fri, 26 Dec 2014 14:00:55 +0000 Anne Gillespie Mitchell http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=22903 Read more]]> Delaware was the first state to ratify the U.S. Constitution on December 7, 1787.

Library of Congress, “Mill on the Brandywine,” pen and watercolor, John Rubens Smith, ca 1828

Library of Congress, “Mill on the Brandywine,” pen and watercolor, John Rubens Smith, ca 1828

Five things you may not have known about the First State:

  1. Delaware is 96 miles long and at it’s widest point 35 miles across.
  2. The first recognized settlement of Europeans was called New Sweden in 1638.
  3. Seaford, Delaware is known as the Nylon Capital of the World, due to DuPont first producing nylon in a factory there.
  4. Delaware is the only state without any  national parks, seashores, historic sites, battlefields, memorials, or monuments.
  5. John Dickinson, a Delaware native,  was called the Penman of the Revolution for his writings on independence.
Our new free state guide, “Delaware Research Guide: Family History Sources in the First State,” has an overview and timeline of the state, along with resources to explore when searching for your Delaware ancestors. Guides for other states are also available in the Learning Center under Free State Research Guides.
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Ask Ancestry Anne: Where Is My Native American DNA?http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/11/24/ask-ancestry-anne-where-is-my-native-american-dna/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=ask-ancestry-anne-where-is-my-native-american-dna http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/11/24/ask-ancestry-anne-where-is-my-native-american-dna/#comments Mon, 24 Nov 2014 15:15:02 +0000 Anne Gillespie Mitchell http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=22644 Read more]]> inheritance 50_50

DNA Inheritance

 

Question: I recently had my DNA analyzed and was surprised when the results did not show any evidence of my Cherokee connection.

My great-great-grandmother was one-fourth Cherokee (Tiptendille Tribe-TN). Would the traces of the Native American heritage be so minute that they would not be evident anymore?

– Shauna

 

Answer: The short answer is yes, the traces of Native American DNA in your test may be too small to detect.  Let’s look at why.

If your great-great-grandmother was ¼ Cherokee, then it was her grandparent that was 100% Native American. And that would be your 4th-great-grandparent. Now your great-great-grandmother would get 50% of her DNA from her mother and 50% from her father. To make this easy, let’s divide by 2 for every generation.

dna percentage1

So how much of your great-great-grandmother’s DNA are you likely to have?  Probably around 1.5625%! And that may not be enough to detect Native American ethnicity.

dna percentage2

If you can find older generations on that line to test, I recommend that.  Also, get brothers, sisters and cousins tested.  You never know who might have enough DNA to be detected.

Even if you find the DNA connection, you will still want to follow the paper trail.  I recommend our Native American Research Guide to get you started.

Happy searching!

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Welcome to the Cotton State! Alabama Research Guidehttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/11/22/welcome-to-the-cotton-state-alabama-research-guide/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=welcome-to-the-cotton-state-alabama-research-guide http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/11/22/welcome-to-the-cotton-state-alabama-research-guide/#comments Sat, 22 Nov 2014 13:00:36 +0000 Anne Gillespie Mitchell http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=22636 Read more]]> Sometimes known as the Cotton State, Alabama actually has no official nickname.

Library of Congress, “Scenes from Alabama…,” digital TIFF file, Carol M Highsmith, 2010

Library of Congress, “Scenes from Alabama…,” digital TIFF file, Carol M Highsmith, 2010

Five things you may not have known about Alabama:

  1. Huntsville is known as the rocket capital of the world.
  2. Workers in Alabama built the rocket that put the first man on the moon.
  3. Sequoyah, a Alabama resident, created the Cherokee phonetic, written alphabet.
  4. A prehistoric skeleton of a man was found in Russell Cave.
  5. Baseball players Henry Louis “Hank” Aaron and Willie Howard Mays, as well as boxer Joe Louis are all natives of Alabama.

Our new free state guide, Alabama Research Guide: Family History Sources in the Cotton State, has an overview and timeline of the state, along with resources to explore when searching for your Alabama ancestors. Guides for other states are also available in the Learning Center under Free State Research Guides.

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Do You Have Revolutionary War Patriots in Your Tree?http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/11/04/do-you-have-revolutionary-war-patriots-in-your-tree/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=do-you-have-revolutionary-war-patriots-in-your-tree http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/11/04/do-you-have-revolutionary-war-patriots-in-your-tree/#comments Tue, 04 Nov 2014 14:08:10 +0000 Anne Gillespie Mitchell http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=22125 Read more]]> Click on the image to see and download the full size graphic.

Click on the image to see and download the full size graphic.

With Veteran’s Day approaching, it is a good time to take a look at your tree and identify those who served. Our infographic from Fold3 gives you a handy guide to for possible birth years of veterans and what wars they might have served in.

Do you think some of your ancestors fought in the Revolutionary War? There are many collections you can look in, but pension records are a good place to start.

Pension records often contain invaluable genealogical information, including vital events that you most likely won’t find anywhere else. For the Revolutionary War, the Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files contain an estimated 80,000 application files from officers and enlisted men who served in the Revolutionary War in all branches of the American military: army, navy, and marines. Even if the claim was rejected, there will still be information there.

You won’t always be this lucky, but check out this excellent summary of Thomas Martin’s children. And notice there the family “recycled” the name John for a son, after the first one died.

martin-children

That particular collection is just the beginning. Other Revolutionary War collections you should check out on Ancestry include:

Don’t forget to look at Revolutionary War Records on Fold3, including:

  • Revolutionary War Service Records. These are compiled service records for the regular soldiers of the Continental Army, and for the militia, volunteers, and others who served with them. The records are arranged under the designation “Continental Troops” or a state name, then by organization, and then alphabetically by the soldier’s surname.
  • Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783. Browse these rolls by state and name of organization (regiment, battalion, guard, company, etc.).

If you find a Revolutionary War Veteran, you may want to consider applying to the Daughters of the American Revolution or the Sons of the American Revolution.  You can find some tips to get you started in our article “Where Were Your Ancestors on July 4th, 1776?

Happy searching!

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Ancestry Weekly Roundup: November 3rd Editionhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/11/03/ancestry-weekly-roundup-november-3rd-edition/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=ancestry-weekly-roundup-november-3rd-edition http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/11/03/ancestry-weekly-roundup-november-3rd-edition/#comments Mon, 03 Nov 2014 14:47:10 +0000 Anne Gillespie Mitchell http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=22101 Read more]]> Blog Posts
Poster by the Burlington & Missouri River R. R. Co. advertising land in Iowa and Nebraska, 1872. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress.

Poster by the Burlington & Missouri River R. R. Co. advertising land in Iowa and Nebraska, 1872. Image courtesy of the Library of Congress.

Ancestry.com

Fold3

Newspapers.com

Videos

Five-Minute Finds:

From the Barefoot Genealogist:

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Welcome to the Silver State! Nevada State Research Guidehttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/10/31/welcome-to-the-silver-state-nevada-state-research-guide/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=welcome-to-the-silver-state-nevada-state-research-guide http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/10/31/welcome-to-the-silver-state-nevada-state-research-guide/#comments Fri, 31 Oct 2014 13:35:16 +0000 Anne Gillespie Mitchell http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=21968 Read more]]> Happy 150th Birthday, Nevada! Nevada was admitted to the Union on October 31st, 1864.

Five things you may not have known about the Silver State:

Chollar Mine

Library of Congress, “Silver mine in Virginia City, dates back to 1860,” digital from original, Carol M Highsmith, between 1980 and 2006.

  1. Bugsy Siegel gave the Flamingo hotel its name in honor of the long legs of his girlfriend Virginia Hill.
  2. Nevada is also known as the “Battle Born State” because of its admission to the Union during the Civil War.
  3. Nevada means “snowfall” in Spanish.
  4. There are more mountain ranges in Nevada than any other state; the highest point is Boundary Peak at 13,145 feet.
  5. Nevada produces more gold than any other state in the U.S; it is second only to South Africa worldwide.
Our new free state guide, “Nevada Research Guide: Family History Sources in the Silver State,” has an overview and timeline of the state, along with resources to explore when searching for your Nevada ancestors. Guides for other states are also available in the Learning Center under Free State Research Guides.
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Ask Ancestry Anne: How Can I Share My Family Tree in an Interesting Way?http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/10/29/ask-ancestry-anne-how-can-i-share-my-family-tree-in-an-interesting-way/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=ask-ancestry-anne-how-can-i-share-my-family-tree-in-an-interesting-way http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/10/29/ask-ancestry-anne-how-can-i-share-my-family-tree-in-an-interesting-way/#comments Wed, 29 Oct 2014 14:22:18 +0000 Anne Gillespie Mitchell http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=21852 Read more]]> Question: How can I transfer my information from my family tree to some sort of hard copy, such as a computer printer copy ?  I would like to make copies for family members.

Answer: Printing your tree out is possible from a program like Family Tree Maker, but I suggest you go with something with a little more pizzazz.

MyCanvas, an Ancestry tool, provides multiple ways for you to create a beautiful family history book or family tree posters which can make sharing fun and enjoyable for everyone.

Juliana Szucs has created a Five Minute Find: Creating a MyCanvas Poster to get you started. Or if you have a little more time to spend, check out Using MyCanvas to Make Descendant Family History Books and Posters and Using MyCanvas to Print and Share Your Family Stories on our Webinars page.

You can also easily share your project — click on the Share this project link, enter an email address, write a personal message, and send  an invitation to view your project.

You will find the Share this project link on the My Projects page,  under the name of the project you want to share. Then click on “Email to a friend” in the drop down menu.

MyCanvas 2

The invitee will get an email to view your project. They will not be able to make any changes to your project, but they can view and order it a hard copy if they choose.

When they receive the invitation, they will see something like:

MyCanvas 1

 

You may also allow your invitee to save a copy of the project to their own account. They will be able to edit their copy, but their edits will not change your copy of the project.

MyCanvas is a wonderful way to preserve and share your family history, photos, and stories. This Share feature enables you to easily share your work with others, even when they don’t live close by.

 

 

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Ten Free Data Collections to Get You Started With Your Family Historyhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/10/29/ten-free-data-collections-to-get-you-started-with-your-family-history/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=ten-free-data-collections-to-get-you-started-with-your-family-history http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/10/29/ten-free-data-collections-to-get-you-started-with-your-family-history/#comments Wed, 29 Oct 2014 13:56:45 +0000 Anne Gillespie Mitchell http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=21822 Read more]]> Calvary Cemetery. Photo by Lou Szucs.

Calvary Cemetery. Photo by Lou Szucs.

Money a little tight?  Are you looking for a free way to get a relative hooked on family history? (Aren’t we all?)

Creating trees on Ancestry is always free — you just need to register. Check out these free data collections to help fill in some branches:

  1. 1940 US Census: Find one ancestor in here and you can get your tree started in no time.
  2. 1880 US Census: Find your ancestors in here and you may have a Civil War connection.
  3. Web: Obituary Daily Times Index, 1995-Current: We scan the web so you don’t have to. The Obituary Daily Times Index has over 15 million records for you to view.
  4. US Naturalization Record Indexes, 1791-1992 (Indexed in World Archives Project): The World Archives Project contributors index millions of records and the indexes are free.
  5. 1881 England Census: Have English ancestors? Look for them in the 1881 England Census
  6. England & Wales, FreeBMD Birth Index, 1837-1915: Find English and Welsh birth in this index courtesy of the FreeBMD contributors.
  7. JewishGen Online Worldwide Burial Registry (JOWBR): Jewish ancestry? Check for burials in JOWBR.
  8. Message Boards and RootsWeb: Lots of helpful advice, family trees, data, and other information in these two locations.
  9. Find A Grave: Millions of grave markers have been photographed and memorialized. It pays to check this site often.
  10. War of 1812 Pension Files: Supported by donations, the 1812 pension files on Fold3 are free. More than 1.4 million images are already online.

So go take a look or send someone who thinks they might be interested to one of these data collections. It could be the start of a lifelong family history journey!

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Ancestry Weekly Roundup: October 27th Editionhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/10/27/ancestry-weekly-roundup-october-27th-edition/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=ancestry-weekly-roundup-october-27th-edition http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/10/27/ancestry-weekly-roundup-october-27th-edition/#comments Mon, 27 Oct 2014 16:43:26 +0000 Anne Gillespie Mitchell http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=21813 Read more]]> Blog Posts
TitanicAncestry.com
Newspapers.com

 

Videos

Between The Leaves
From the Barefoot Genealogist:
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