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About Amy Johnson Crow
Amy Johnson Crow is a Community Manager for Ancestry.com. She's a Certified Genealogist and an active lecturer and author. Her roots run deep in the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic states. She earned her Masters degree in Library and Information Science at Kent State University. Amy loves to help people discover the joys of learning about their ancestors and she thinks that there are few things better than a day in a cemetery. You can find her on Facebook, Twitter, and No Story Too Small.

Articles by Amy Johnson Crow

New Sources for Black Sheep, Part 1: New York Prison Records

Posted on July 8, 2014 in Collections

“If you can’t get rid of the skeleton in your closet, you’d best teach it to dance.” Those words by George Bernard Shaw are a good reminder to those with black sheep in the family. (And who doesn’t have one or two of those?) Records created about the ne’er-do-wells of the family can be rich… Read more

There’s a Fire! Remain Calm!

Posted on July 8, 2014 in Research

  Sooner or later, you’re likely to hear that dreaded phrase, “Sorry, but the courthouse burned and the records you’re looking for don’t exist.” (Variations include “there was a flood,” “there was an earthquake,” and “the records were absconded by aliens.” Ok, maybe not that last one.) When you hear that the records have been… Read more

Librarians in Las Vegas: An ALA Wrap-up

Posted on July 4, 2014 in Events, In The Community

The American Library Association (ALA) had its annual conference this past weekend in Las Vegas. More than 18,000 librarians from across the United States and several foreign countries gathered for learning, networking, and seeing the latest and greatest from all types of vendors. Here are some of the things that I learned while at the… Read more

Finding Revolutionary War Patriots

Posted on July 4, 2014 in Military Records, Research

John Trimble served his country while it was still fighting for its independence from England. His first enlistment was in February 1778 and was at Valley Forge. His job was “guarding the people from taking provision to the British in Philadelphia.” But when his two-month tour was over, his service was not. He enlisted again… Read more

Throwback Thursday Theme: 4th of July

Posted on July 3, 2014 in Holidays, In The Community

  The 4th of July for many American families is a time for cookouts, parades, and fireworks. While I was growing up, the 4th for my family also meant vacation in northern Michigan. We rented a cabin at Carp Lake, just south of Mackinaw, and it was there that our 4th of July traditions were… Read more

Throwback Thursday Theme: At the Movies

Posted on June 26, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site

I distinctly remember the first movie that I saw in a theater. My sister and one of her girl friends took me to the Town & Country Cinema, not far from our house. It was a matinee and the movie was Bambi. (No, it wasn’t during its original release in 1942. It was during one… Read more

New Puerto Rico Records and Research Guides

Posted on June 9, 2014 in Collections, Research

We’ve just launched a new collection with more than 5 million vital records from Puerto Rico. Civil registration began in Puerto Rico in 1885, and the records can contain rich details, sometimes even mentioning several generations. For example, a birth record might list the names of the child, parents, and grandparents. Before you start researching… Read more

Throwback Thursday Theme: Where Your Parents Worked

Posted on June 4, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site

In the eyes of a child, a workplace can seem magical. There’s something about being allowed in where adults work. It’s like that office or factory is a whole other world. That’s how I felt about my dad’s service station. Yes, I said “service station,” not “gas station.” Slane and Johnson Texaco (and later, Slane… Read more

Honoring the Dead: What Military Headstones Can Tell Us

Posted on May 30, 2014 in Research

Memorial Day is now observed in the United States on the last Monday in May. However, today (May 30) is the “traditional” holiday. In 1868, Maj. General John Logan declared that May 30 should be set aside as a day to decorate the graves of those who had died in the Civil War. Various observances… Read more

Finding Ocean State Ancestors: Rhode Island Research Guide

Posted on May 23, 2014 in Research

  The history of Rhode Island is tied to religion and trade. Settlement began with Roger Williams, who in 1636 went to present-day Rhode Island after being banished from the Massachusetts Bay Colony for his religious views. Later, Anne Hutchinson and her followers also went to Rhode Island because of religious persecution in Massachusetts. Rhode… Read more

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