About Amy Johnson Crow

Amy Johnson Crow is a Certified Genealogist and an active lecturer and author. Her roots run deep in the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic states. She earned her Masters degree in Library and Information Science at Kent State University. Amy loves to help people discover the joys of learning about their ancestors and she thinks that there are few things better than a day in a cemetery. You can find her on Facebook, Twitter, and Amy Johnson Crow.

Past Articles

3 Things to Periodically Do in Your Genealogy Research

Posted on April 21, 2016 in Research

Genealogy is far from a routine pursuit. There is always something new to learn, whether it is a new resource or a new method to try out. For me, that’s part of what makes genealogy so enjoyable! But for as much fun as it is to learn about new things and add more people to… Read more

Finding Children When There Isn’t a Will

Posted on April 18, 2016 in Research

The U.S. Wills and Probates collections hold the answer to countless questions about our family trees. As you’re going through, don’t be disappointed if your ancestor didn’t leave a will. His (or sometimes her) death could still have generated records that answer who the children are. Guardianship Records Guardians become involved when the minor heirs have a… Read more

Teasing the Truth From a Family Legend

Posted on April 8, 2016 in Research

“You know we’re related to Brigham Young.” That’s what my Grandma Johnson told me way back when I was first starting to show an interest in our family history. I was fairly impressed. When it came to matters of our ancestry, Grandma was always right. Except when she wasn’t. Working With the Family Legends Family… Read more

Finding Probate Records That Aren’t Indexed

Posted on April 7, 2016 in Ancestry.com Site

Amy Johnson Crow shows you how to dive deeper in our rich U.S. Wills and Probates collection by using film strip navigation and page selection to more easily pinpoint un-indexed records that could include your ancestors. Tune in below:    

Using Death Records to Find Hidden Children and Married Daughters

Posted on March 28, 2016 in Research

Birth records are wonderful, but they don’t always give us the complete picture of the family. There could be children listed without first names (which can make it harder to find them in a search). There’s also the sad reality that some infants who were stillborn or who died shortly after birth weren’t recorded in… Read more

Exploring the Probate Records County by County

Posted on March 14, 2016 in Collections

In genealogy, it’s always a good idea to review what records are available for the specific locations we are researching. Probate records are no exception. Probate records vary not only from state to state, but also from county to county. How one county arranged its records might not be exactly the same as a neighboring… Read more

5-Minute Find: Using the Sons of American Revolution Applications

Posted on March 2, 2016 in Collections

The Sons of the American Revolution is a lineage society for men who descend from a patriot of the Revolutionary War. Ancestry is home to a rich collection of applications to the organization that detail lineage to Revolutionary War patriots. In this video, Amy Johnson Crow shares helpful tips for effectively using this collection. Tune in below: Armed with Amy’s… Read more

Musical Leap Year Babies

Posted on February 29, 2016 in Ancestry.com Site

“Musical leaplings” isn’t the name of a new television show for kids (though it sounds like it should be!) Leapling is a term given to people born on that rarest of dates, February 29. Coincidentally, not one but two of the biggest names in American music in the mid-20th century were both leaplings: Dinah Shore… Read more

Exploring Michigan Death Records

Posted on February 16, 2016 in Collections

If you’re researching Michigan ancestors, you should take a look at the new collection on Ancestry: Michigan, Death Records, 1867-1950. This collection contains more than 8 million records from the Michigan Department of Community Health, Division for Vital Statistics and Health Statistics. There are two types of death records in the collection. The 1867-1897 records… Read more

Getting the Most from Your Offline Research Dollars

Posted on January 28, 2016 in Research

Unless you were the winner of the recent $1.5 billion lottery, you probably don’t have unlimited money to spend on your genealogy. Although Ancestry provides access to billions of records, there are times when you have to obtain a copy directly from a record office. Here are some tips for making the most of your offline genealogy… Read more