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About Amy Johnson Crow
Amy Johnson Crow is a Community Manager for Ancestry.com. She's a Certified Genealogist and an active lecturer and author. Her roots run deep in the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic states. Amy loves to help people discover the joys of learning about their ancestors and she thinks that there are few things better than a day in a cemetery. You can find her on Facebook, Twitter, and No Story Too Small.

Articles by Amy Johnson Crow

Pennsylvania Death Certificates Now Available

Posted on April 18, 2014 in Collections, Research

Pennsylvania research just got easier, thanks to the release of Pennsylvania, Death Certificates 1906-1924. This collection contains more than 2.4 million records and has images of the actual death certificates. Statewide registration of births and deaths began on 1 January 1906. This collection of death certificates currently runs through the end of 1924 (later records… Read more

Paying Taxes… Or Not

Posted on April 15, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site, Collections

They say that the only things certain in life are death and taxes. Genealogists are used to dealing with records surrounding an ancestor’s death, but what about taxes? Tax Basics Tax records in many locations date back earlier than vital records. They’re great for our research because they tend to be kept on a regular… Read more

Research in the Old Line State: Maryland State Guide

Posted on April 11, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site

Many of us (myself included) can trace our roots back to Maryland. The history we can find there is fascinating, both in terms of our families’ and the state’s. Maryland can be described as a land of contradictions. It was founded in part to be a safe haven for Catholics from England who wanted to… Read more

Well-To-Do or Poor as Church Mice? Figuring Out Your Ancestor’s Wealth

Posted on April 8, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site, Research

April 5 – 12 is Money Smart Week, designed to help people learn more about their personal finances. Did you know that you can also learn about your ancestors’ financial well-being? You probably don’t have access to their checkbooks (or the jars of cash buried in the back yard), but there are some common records… Read more

Learning From the Many Names of Mickey Rooney

Posted on April 7, 2014 in Celebrity, Research

When I heard about the death of actor Mickey Rooney, I did what many genealogists do when a famous person of that era passes away: I looked for him in the 1940 census. It turns out that his entry tells us not only about him, but also an important lesson about the not-so-famous people in… Read more

Degrees of “Cousin-ness”

Posted on March 29, 2014 in Research

As we research our family history  we often make connections with distant cousins, either through our online trees or DNA testing, who we hadn’t met before. But what is the proper term for said distant relatives? It can be confusing trying to figure it out. If your closest relative is a great grandparent, but there… Read more

Calling All Cornhuskers! It’s the Nebraska State Research Guide

Posted on March 21, 2014 in Research

If Indiana is the “Crossroads of America,” Nebraska could be “America’s Main Thoroughfare.” The Platte River and its tributaries have been a natural east-west trail for ages. As the United States pushed westward, railroads began to look at Nebraska as a desirable route for a transcontinental railroad. If your ancestors ended up in the West,… Read more

Women of the West

Posted on March 14, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site

March is Women’s History Month. Women are sometimes hidden in history and in the records we use in our research. Husbands leave bequests in their wills to “my beloved wife.” Women are listed as “Mrs. John Smith” in newspaper articles. It can be challenging to pull out the stories of the female half of the… Read more

Ancestors in The Buckeye State: Ohio Research Guide

Posted on March 13, 2014 in Research

Ohio has a place in many of our family trees. Whether they were just passing through or they put down roots, many of our ancestors (mine included) called Ohio “home.” As an original gateway to the west, Ohio drew in people from across the east and south. Connecticut claimed much of the northeastern part of… Read more

African American Civil War Veterans and the Grand Army of the Republic

Posted on February 26, 2014 in Collections

African Americans gave proud service during the Civil War. More than 186,000 men served in the United States Colored Troops (USCT), approximately 18,000 served in the U.S. Navy, and thousands more in segregated state regiments, such as the famed 54th Massachusetts Infantry. Pension records often come to mind when researching these individuals, but your research… Read more

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