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About Amy Johnson Crow
Amy Johnson Crow is a Community Manager for Ancestry.com. She's a Certified Genealogist and an active lecturer and author. Her roots run deep in the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic states. Amy loves to help people discover the joys of learning about their ancestors and she thinks that there are few things better than a day in a cemetery. You can find her on Facebook, Twitter, and No Story Too Small.

Articles by Amy Johnson Crow

Dear Census Taker: Read the Instructions

Posted on July 21, 2014 in Research

Dear Census Taker: I would have addressed this as “Dear Enumerator,” but was concerned that you had not yet read the instructions that have been given to you and, thus, might be unfamiliar with that term. Those instructions are why I am writing to you today. Following these instructions will generate much joy for the… Read more

It’s Greek to Me: What We Can Learn From the Rosetta Stone

Posted on July 19, 2014 in Research

Ptolemy V had a problem. He was pharaoh, but was fighting opposition in parts of Egypt. Compounding the issue was the fact that he was only 13. On the first anniversary of his coronation, the priests issued a decree in support of young Ptolemy. To make sure everyone understood, they inscribed it in three languages:… Read more

What We Are Reading: July 18 Edition

Posted on July 18, 2014 in In The Community

I enjoy reading about other people’s research. Even if they don’t mention one of my ancestors, I often come away with ideas for new sources to look for, a new way of using a source I hadn’t thought of before, or motivation to keep up the search. What we’ve been reading this week has a little… Read more

Throwback Thursday Topic: The Moon Landing

Posted on July 17, 2014 in In The Community

This Sunday, July 20, marks the 45th anniversary of the moon landing. What once was unimaginable was suddenly happening and we could watch it from the comfort of our living rooms. For this week’s Throwback Thursday, several of us got together and shared our memories of that historic event. Juliana Szucs Smith: Last week I… Read more

What We Are Reading: July 11 Edition

Posted on July 11, 2014 in In The Community

The Internet is bursting at the seams (virtually) with genealogy and history. (I suspect that Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web for the sole purpose of researching his family tree.) With so much being published every day, it’s easy to miss out on some wonderful articles. That’s why we’re starting a new weekly column… Read more

New Sources for Black Sheep, Part 2: California Prison Records

Posted on July 11, 2014 in Collections

Richard Perkins was born in Kentucky around 1845. As a young man, he answered the call of the West and headed to California to seek his fortune. Things didn’t go as he had planned, so he decided to take the alias of “Dick Fellows” and supplement his income by robbing stagecoaches. In 1870, he was… Read more

New Sources for Black Sheep, Part 1: New York Prison Records

Posted on July 8, 2014 in Collections

“If you can’t get rid of the skeleton in your closet, you’d best teach it to dance.” Those words by George Bernard Shaw are a good reminder to those with black sheep in the family. (And who doesn’t have one or two of those?) Records created about the ne’er-do-wells of the family can be rich… Read more

There’s a Fire! Remain Calm!

Posted on July 8, 2014 in Research

  Sooner or later, you’re likely to hear that dreaded phrase, “Sorry, but the courthouse burned and the records you’re looking for don’t exist.” (Variations include “there was a flood,” “there was an earthquake,” and “the records were absconded by aliens.” Ok, maybe not that last one.) When you hear that the records have been… Read more

Librarians in Las Vegas: An ALA Wrap-up

Posted on July 4, 2014 in Events, In The Community

The American Library Association (ALA) had its annual conference this past weekend in Las Vegas. More than 18,000 librarians from across the United States and several foreign countries gathered for learning, networking, and seeing the latest and greatest from all types of vendors. Here are some of the things that I learned while at the… Read more

Finding Revolutionary War Patriots

Posted on July 4, 2014 in Military Records, Research

John Trimble served his country while it was still fighting for its independence from England. His first enlistment was in February 1778 and was at Valley Forge. His job was “guarding the people from taking provision to the British in Philadelphia.” But when his two-month tour was over, his service was not. He enlisted again… Read more

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