Posted by on February 26, 2016 in Ancestry.com Site

needles and threadAre you getting stuck researching your African American ancestors?  Ancestry Academy might have the answer: Needles and Threads: Piecing Together African American Families.  Explore African American research with one of genealogy’s foremost experts in African American genealogy, Deborah A. Abbott. She’ll show you how to uncover resources, documents, and archives you never imagined existed and help you find more about your African American roots and understand more about their lives.

profDr. Abbott has presented lectures at national and state genealogical conferences. During the 2011 Federation of Genealogy Societies Conference, she delivered the James Dent Walker Memorial Lecture titled “Slave Research: A Closer Look at Freedom.” One of her major research projects that traces an African American family from slavery in Kentucky to freedom in Illinois was highlighted in The Cleveland Plain Dealer under the title of “Six Volumes to Amplify a Family History.”

Through examples and case studies, you’ll explore the many areas of African American research you may be overlooking and provide some answers to puzzles you may have in your own family history. One lesson at a time  you’ll learn unique methods to locating your slave ancestors, as well as free persons of color.

 

 

About Anne Gillespie Mitchell

Anne Gillespie Mitchell is a Senior Product Manager at Ancestry.com. She is an active blogger on Ancestry.com and writes the Ancestry Anne column. She has been chasing her ancestors through Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina for many years. Anne holds a certificate from Boston University's Online Genealogical Research Program. You can also find her on Twitter, Facebook and Finding Forgotten Stories.

1 Comment

Evalyn 

Looking for ship from Portugal to U.S. At 1917, or 1918 with name Ramondo Amado.

March 8, 2016 at 8:36 am

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