Posted by on August 15, 2014 in Research
Library of Congress, "Watercolor at the Thomas F. Eagleton, U.S. Courthouse, St. Louis, Missouri," original digital file, Prints & Photographs Online Catalog, ( http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2010720602/ : accessed 12 Aug 2014), photo taken 2009, Reproduction no. LC-DIG-highsm-11131.

Library of Congress, “Watercolor at the Thomas F. Eagleton, U.S. Courthouse, St. Louis, Missouri,” original digital file, Prints & Photographs Online Catalog, ( http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/2010720602/ : accessed 12 Aug 2014), photo taken 2009, Reproduction no. LC-DIG-highsm-11131.

Missouri became the 24th state on August 10, 1821.

Five things you may not have known about the Show Me State:

  1. Congressman Willard Duncan Vandiver is credited with the state’s nickname when he first said, “I’m from Missouri and you’ve got to show me.”
  2. Kansas City has more miles of boulevards than Paris and more fountains than any city except Rome.
  3. Missouri gets its name from a Native American tribe of the same name; Missouri means “town of the large canoes.”
  4. Aunt Jemima pancake flour was invented in St. Joseph, Missouri.  It was the first ready-mix food introduced commercially.
  5. The most powerful earthquake to ever shake the United States happened in New Madrid, Missouri in 1811.  It caused the Mississippi River to run backwards for a time and was felt at least 1,000 miles away.
Our new free state guide, “Missouri Research Guide: Family History Sources in the Show Me State,” has an overview and timeline of the state, along with resources to explore when searching for your Oklahoma ancestors. Guides for other states are also available in the Learning Center under Free State Research Guides.

About Anne Gillespie Mitchell

Anne Gillespie Mitchell is a Senior Product Manager at Ancestry.com. She is an active blogger on Ancestry.com and writes the Ancestry Anne column. She has been chasing her ancestors through Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina for many years. Anne holds a certificate from Boston University's Online Genealogical Research Program, and is currently on the clock working towards certification from the Board for Certification of Genealogists. You can also find her on Twitter, Facebook and Finding Forgotten Stories.

10 Comments

Dottie Baugh 

Love your tricks and tips.
Dottie Baugh
President CCGSI

August 15, 2014 at 8:20 am
CARLA 

i am asking that all of ancestry.com be free and accessable to the general public,it,s not fair to us that the stars on who do you think you are get to use ancestry.com for free.if they can use it for free then we the general public should be able to use it for free!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

August 15, 2014 at 8:29 am
Barbara Cohen 

I have been a member with a World Wide membership for some years. I do not find the search results as they are displayed after the last upgrade. Previously the actual list of records were produced when searching, now we get a display of sources and some have no relevance to my search! For example, I have name, vital stats, & city/State/Country but the results will show me other countries and record sources that do not apply. Wish we could return to the prior search results which made my research much easier.

August 15, 2014 at 10:07 am
Robert White 

Hi. I live in Southern California and am trying to overcome my White brick wall in Missouri with DNA testing. Bob White

August 15, 2014 at 11:01 am
Karen 

2nd to last line “searching for your Oklahoma ancestors” instead of Missour. FYI. :-)

August 15, 2014 at 11:12 am
Pat 

As much as I would like Ancestry to be free too, you must remember it is a business. There is a lot of money invested in scanning records, designing the software and putting it on the web. They used to have a program where you could get a discount off your membership if you volunteered to transcribe records. Have you ever thought of doing that?

August 15, 2014 at 12:46 pm
Barb 

I live in Missouri. My family moved here in 1835. Does everyone know that the death records are on the Secretary of State website? The Archives in Jefferson City are fabulous resource too.

August 15, 2014 at 7:25 pm
Laura Johnson 

Here is a free site for Missouri death and birth records

August 16, 2014 at 10:09 am
August 16, 2014 at 10:09 am
Janet Montgomery 

Laura, Thank you so much for posting that web site! I found all kinds of interesting stories and information.

August 16, 2014 at 6:15 pm