Posted by on August 6, 2014 in AncestryDNA

You share DNA with your family and now you can SHARE your DNA results with them, thanks to the newest AncestryDNA feature. I bought a kit for my sister a few months ago, had her take the test, and I activated the test on my account. She has been interested in seeing those results and now I can easily share them with her. I can send her an invitation via the site so she can not only see the ethnicity portion, but also the matches to her own results.

This new feature works similar to the tree share feature. You can invite an individual by email or their Ancestry.com username. The invitation is a request to access the DNA results with a level of sharing: guest, editor, or administrator (admin). Although there can only be one admin for each test, you can be an admin for many tests. (Note: Admins can delete tests and once you delete a test you cannot get the results back.)

You can find the list of roles for sharing your DNA results and what each one means by visiting the DNA tab and click on “Settings.” Scroll down to the section “Sharing DNA results” and click “Invite others to access DNA results.”

sharing your dna results

Here is where you can see who you have invited to share, what level of sharing and resend invitations that haven’t been accepted.

invite-others-access-DNA

We wish you the best, and if you want to see the step-by-step on how to use this feature, Sharing my AncestryDNA results, click here.

This is a feature that was requested by many of our users. We appreciate your feedback and patience as we continue to improve the AncestryDNA experience for you. Learn more about AncestryDNA and what it can do for you, click here.

About Anna Swayne

Anna Swayne has 8 years of experience in the DNA genealogy world. At Ancestry, she leads efforts in developing education to help our community maximize their experience with AncestryDNA. She believes there is real power behind DNA and the story it can unlock for each of us.When she is not talking DNA you can find her hiking or cycling in the mountains or cooking at home.

30 Comments

Mel Lorenzo 

I am seeing on the screen shot the option to download Raw DNA results…

How does one do that?

Thank You,
Mel Lorenzo

August 6, 2014 at 6:35 pm
Elizabeth Maher Moreno 

My husband Robert Moreno recently received his DNA results from Ancestry.com. Is there more detail available for Native American results? That is, is there any way to see the regions that his DNA most likely matches? The analysis highlighted North and South America. There were many peoples settled in that huge region – Inuit, Peruvian, Plains Indians, Southwest, Mexico, etc. Are there any plans to provide more detail?

August 6, 2014 at 6:36 pm
Michael Ward 

This is a good step forward. From what you describe, we can share data with anyone, not just our immediate families. This should help us find the links.

What would -really- help, of course, is the DNA data (which chromosome, and where on it, lies the match). We don’t need a browser, just the data.

It’s the kind of thing you can see with GEDmatch, but only a small percentage of our AncestryDNA matches have gone those extra miles and made their data available there. We could surely use that info here.

August 6, 2014 at 7:55 pm
Chris Jensen 

How can I print the DNA info?

August 6, 2014 at 8:38 pm
August 7, 2014 at 2:51 am
Shirese 

I don’t understand why you just don’t offer a chromosome browser. I have read that your company believes that a chromosome browser would be too confusing to the majority of your customers. I am not sure how this tool is less confusing. An example, my known maternal 4th cousin also has 106 matches in common with a known paternal second cousin. Just because you have DNA cousins in common does not mean that you all share the same ancestor.

August 7, 2014 at 6:27 am
TMH 

The question is, if you let someone see their results as a guest, can they see everyone else’s results and other information on your family tree. For privacy reasons I would only want them to see their own test results and their own matches.

August 7, 2014 at 7:26 am
Pat Burns 

The more information that is available, the better things are. No doubt this improvement is very helpful to people who are not administering their own trees. I can’t say it helps me, however. I already see my matches’ ethnicity and trees, if they choose to let me, and I don’t know that knowing the percentages of their ethnicity would particularly help. Information about matching chromosomes would narrow down where to look for a common ancestor. What Michael Ward or Shirese are requesting would be very helpful.

What I would like to see is a symbol or something that indicates if the owner of or someone in a family tree has taken the DNA test. That way, if I’m looking at someone as a potential common ancestor to one of my matches and me, and I see half a dozen people who have tested and are not among my matches with that someone in their ancestry, I can presume the common ancestor is probably someone else.

August 7, 2014 at 11:19 am
Candice Traylor 

I and my husband along with some of the family were very happy with the results of the DNA test done on my husband Glen. I plan on doing mine in the future as well. As for three people in the family they were
not happy with it because they said it did not pin point or narrow it down to pin point where the person came from. To me their is just no way to make people happy.

August 11, 2014 at 4:43 am
Anna Swayne 

@TMH, once you allow an individual to see the DNA results of a test, they can only see the results of that particular test (ethnicity and matching). For example if my cousin shares his DNA results with me, I now can see his cousin matches and ethnicity results for that particular test. If his mom’s results are on his account I won’t be able to see those results unless he shares those with me separately.

August 13, 2014 at 3:36 pm
Anna Swayne 

We understand this doesn’t solve for everything. We appreciate your feedback, we will continue to work on new features that will allow us to maximize our own DNA results. Thanks for reading the blog!

August 13, 2014 at 3:38 pm
Mscingram 

A researcher has long believed that he and I are both descendants of the sane woman, my 3x great grandmother. Now that we have both done ancestry DNA testing, how do we use the results to confirm or disprove the theory?

August 16, 2014 at 6:52 pm
joyce brown workman mosher 

The dna results were very interesting, I am still trying to connect with the workman linek

September 10, 2014 at 8:53 pm
Ray Triboulet 

I bought a kit for my wife and I and am waiting their arrival. In the meantime is there anyway I can transfer my information from 23andme?

September 10, 2014 at 9:00 pm
John Porterfield 

My results appear to show ONLY the male lineage. I have Cherokee ancestry through my Grandmothers, but no linkage appears. My Cousin has the same complaint. What is going on with that???

September 10, 2014 at 9:33 pm
Cheryl Copas 

AncestryDNA does a phenomenal job of catering to the ‘common man’ who would be intimidated by the technical stuff. However, for those who are slightly ‘geeky’, there really needs to be more, such as ‘partnering’ w/ Gedmatch, which expands and complements Ancestry. There should be a more direct link between Ancestry and Gedmatch besides word of mouth. Not everyone needs or wants Gedmatch, but to some of us it is invaluable.

As to the new DNA results sharing, that is awesome, still a bit glitchy in terms of the invite going through, but getting better.

Major Suggestion… there needs to be a way (like shared trees) to remove results from one’s home page without asking the owner to un-invite you, that feels rude. However, there will be times when one realizes the shared results are no longer useful and have become clutter, so there needs to be a polite way to fix that. Plus (also like trees) it would be nice from my end to be able to see if someone has accepted my invite.

Just FYI, one can only assign the role of guest or editor, not administrator. And it seems that the big difference between guest and editor is that guest means one cannot use the note or star function, which is a bit limiting. It says editor can “change info about person who took DNA test”, but I’m not sure what is meant there, the only thing I’ve found is the inability to leave a star or a note on the match, and I miss that when I can’t, because sometimes I will see (or know) something about the match that the administrator doesn’t and I can’t leave the info if I am only a guest.

I was very angry about the lack of notification for the discontinuation of the previous sharing policy, I had several tests I had purchased for others, they had activated and I could not see their results despite my money purchasing… so this fixes that issue.

Overall kudoos to Ancestry on the new Sharing feature!

September 11, 2014 at 4:13 am
Donnie 

Hi Anne
I receive my DNA resule. I think I was adoped. My DNA does show what my family history is. My parents both pass away. I was not rise by my and not sure who he is. How do I find out if I was adopted?

September 11, 2014 at 7:09 am
Dennis L Cooley 

I had a Y-37 DNA test via Family Tree DNA years ago. Is it possible to share those results on Ancestry.com?

September 11, 2014 at 7:33 am
Christina 

I think this feature has been available for a few weeks now, at least. I was able to invite one person to view my results, but the other people I invited never got my invitation. I also never received their invitations.

So, this is a neat feature, when it works, which isn’t often, unfortunately.

September 11, 2014 at 8:57 am
susan 

this is a good step forward. now just add chromosome number, segment length, cMs, and snps, and it will be even better.

September 11, 2014 at 10:40 am
Jay Haithcox 

I would like to simply show DNA results to relatives. Is there a “report” feature that I could use to print out and hand out?

September 11, 2014 at 11:42 am
Kelly Quirk 

I think it would be great to be able to have a feature for DNA results that provides you with a list of tree’s in your matches that share a common ancestor even if that ancestor is not in your tree. This would help break through research barriers.

Kelly

September 11, 2014 at 7:29 pm
Chris 

Sadly the DENA tests are not available to people outside of the USA.

September 11, 2014 at 9:44 pm
kristal Grissom 

How do I see my DNA results on my mother’s side

September 11, 2014 at 10:23 pm
DavidHarden 

I used FamilyTreeDNA and GenographicProject to run DNA tests. Are you considering some sort of sharing between projects?

September 12, 2014 at 4:24 pm
Lawrence Moeller 

This isn’t working. No matter how many times it is said or how loudly, it isn’t working. I am unable to share the results with my daughter who is an Ancestry subscriber.

September 12, 2014 at 5:33 pm
Donny White 

Forget the DNA. It’s a cheap knock off at best. A flat out scam is more likely. If it really matters to you, find a higher quality test from a more reputable company in the field. It’ll cost $400-$600 I think, but if it really matters to you, spend it. If it’s not that important to you, save your $100 and go to a decent restaurant with your sweetheart. Better yet, donate it to a worthy charity. Because you may as well be flushing if you expect an accurate DNA breakdown from here.

September 12, 2014 at 11:28 pm
Marci 

My question: is the DNA test available thru Ancestry.com accurate enough for someone to use as proof of Native American heritage in order to make a government claim?

September 16, 2014 at 1:18 am
Annette 

Is there a limit to the number of people you can share your results with?
I have sent 20 “shares” and can’t seem to send any more than that?
TIA for any help with this issue.

September 19, 2014 at 6:49 pm
redlionman44 

I have been using this with limited success. About a third of my invites will show that it has been sent, but when I return later, it is not there. Also I send to an email address and nit says the invite has been sent, but it never shows up as having been sent. Lastly some user names just don’t appear to be accepted.
Thank you.

October 1, 2014 at 2:07 pm

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