Posted by on June 6, 2014 in Research
Library of Congress, “Cotton gin at Dahomey, Mississippi,” print from black and white negative, Prints & Photographs Online Catalog, ( http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3b39844  : accessed 3 Jun 2014), Reproduction no.  LC-USZ62-93669

Library of Congress, “Cotton gin at Dahomey, Mississippi,” print from black and white negative,
Prints & Photographs Online Catalog, ( http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3b39844 : accessed 3 Jun 2014), Reproduction no. LC-USZ62-93669

Mississippi was the 20th state admitted to the Union in 1817.

Here are 5 things you might not have known about the Magnolia State:

  • At various times throughout history Mississippi has been under the jurisdiction of France, Spain, Britain, and the United States; don’t assume your ancestors records are stored in the state.
  • Biloxi is the oldest permanent settlement in the Lower Mississippi Valley, established in 1699. Natchez was founded in 1716 and is the oldest city on the Mississippi River.
  • In 1902, on a hunting trip in Mississippi, President Theodore Roosevelt refused to kill a captive bear that had been tied up for that purpose; a subsequent cartoon that appeared in the Washington Star started the Teddy Bear craze.
  • A fifth of the state’s revenues was spent on artificial arms and legs for Confederate veterans in 1866.
  • Mississippi established the first U.S state college for women in 1884.
Our new free state guide, “Mississippi Research Guide: Family History Sources in the Magnolia State,” has an overview and timeline of the state, along with resources to explore when searching for your Mississippi ancestors. Guides for other states are also available in the Learning Center under Free State Research Guides.

About Anne Gillespie Mitchell

Anne Gillespie Mitchell is a Senior Product Manager at Ancestry.com. She is an active blogger on Ancestry.com and writes the Ancestry Anne column. She has been chasing her ancestors through Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina for many years. Anne holds a certificate from Boston University's Online Genealogical Research Program, and is currently on the clock working towards certification from the Board for Certification of Genealogists. You can also find her on Twitter, Facebook and Finding Forgotten Stories.

1 Comment

Kathy Nicotra 

Loved the article. Very interesting.

June 6, 2014 at 8:51 pm