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Attaching Images to Your Tree, Even Without an Index

Posted by Amy Johnson Crow on May 9, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site

Attaching records and images to people in your tree is a great way to keep track of what you have found. Until recently, if you were looking in a collection that was image-only or if you had browsed to a different image, you could only save that image to your computer or to your shoebox. Now, you can attach it directly to someone in your tree.

I was looking in North Carolina, Confederate Soldiers and Widows Pension Applications, 1885-1953 and found a pension file for John A. Lang. I wanted to attach one of the images to someone in my tree. I began by clicking the orange “Save” button and chose “Save to person in your tree.”

Save to someone in your tree

When you’re attaching an image, select the tree where you have the person and then begin typing the person’s name. Pause after the first or last name to allow the drop-down menu to show matches in your tree. Select the person you want to attach this image to.

Fill in the informationYou’ll get a list of events that you can associate with this image. Currently, you can choose from Baptism, Birth, Christening, Confirmation, Death, Marriage, and Residence.

For this pension image, I chose “Residence,” since it lists a specific date and residence. (I could also have chosen “Birth,” since it does list his age as 80 years.)

Fill in the information: how the name was recorded, the date and place of the event, and a description. Because it might not be clear to me later why I chose “Residence” for a pension image, I added “Residence stated in his pension application.”

When you click the “Save” button, you’ll have the option to attach the image to an additional person. This would be handy if this pension image listed his spouse or his children. I could attach this image to those people in my tree, too.

Now when I go to John Lang’s page in my tree, I see that he was living in Pitt County, North Carolina on 1 March 1924. I also see the description that I added when I attached the image. There is a link to the source; when I click it, it takes me right to that image in his pension file.

John Lang in family tree

 

 

 

About Amy Johnson Crow
Amy Johnson Crow is a Community Manager for Ancestry.com. She's a Certified Genealogist and an active lecturer and author. Her roots run deep in the Midwest and Mid-Atlantic states. She earned her Masters degree in Library and Information Science at Kent State University. Amy loves to help people discover the joys of learning about their ancestors and she thinks that there are few things better than a day in a cemetery. You can find her on Facebook, Twitter, and No Story Too Small.

5 comments

Comments
1 donna goodwinMay 9, 2014 at 3:34 pm

Did not know you could do this. I will go back and look. I have been doing it with add a fact. Thank you for the input

2 Jean HollarsMay 9, 2014 at 8:59 pm

The million dollar question is: How do I find anything relevant in a collection that is not indexed? I’ve noticed a lot of the recently added collections are not indexed. I cannot afford the tons of time it would take to browse through them record-by-record hoping to find something of value.

3 Amy Johnson CrowMay 12, 2014 at 8:39 am

Jean — Some collections have a basic index at the beginning of the images. Browse through the first several images to see if there is one. Even if there isn’t a basic index there, it will give you an idea for how the records are arranged — chronologically, alphabetically, etc.

4 Neva Jane Moore SilvaMay 12, 2014 at 2:35 pm

I would love to follow my family back to the time of the revolution but I don’t know how. Also , my husbands parents are from Maderia Island. I don’t know how to get information about them

5 ScwbcmMay 20, 2014 at 4:36 pm

We need a way to save to a new person that is not already in a tree, without having to back out to our tree and then return. We also need a way to make a correction or back up with an item to fix something. You may also want to let people know how to handle the Mrs. which can indicate a married or widowed woman. For example, Mrs. John Smith is not John Smith. I do give credit where credit is due and I am glad this has been implemented. Please provide such an option for sources that have been indexed so that we can add names missed in the indexing. This happens with city directories and with maps.

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