Ancestry.com

Let Me Call Thee Sweetheart

Posted by Lisa Arnold on April 30, 2014 in Collections

Is he a “thee” or a “you”? Our early Quaker ancestors often used peculiar words when speaking to each other. In many languages, there is a familiar or informal form for the second-person pronoun “you” in English. For Quakers, this familiarity was expressed by using “thee” or “thou” in place of “you.” It came to… Read more

AncestryDNA Database Exceeds 400,000 Genotyped Members

Posted by Ancestry.com on April 30, 2014 in AncestryDNA

Developed by a team of genetic scientists, bioinformaticists and data scientists, the AncestryDNA test provides users with a personalized genetic ethnicity estimate from 26 global regions and also connects them to a growing network of genetic cousins and their family histories. The test analyzes a person’s genome at over 700,000 marker locations and provides customers… Read more

Tattoos, Pigeon Theft and Financial Fraud: Introducing The West Yorkshire Collection

Posted by Ancestry.com on April 30, 2014 in Collections

Thousands of 19th century child criminal records have been published online for the first time – shedding light on the delinquent and destitute children of Victorian Britain. The West Yorkshire Collection (1779-1914) details the crimes of thousands of boys admitted to Calder Farm Reformatory, East Moor Community Home School and The Shadwell Children’s Center. More than… Read more

This Week and Always, We Remember

Posted by Juliana Smith on April 28, 2014 in Juliana's Corner, World Archives Project

In the U.S., yesterday marked the start of Days of Remembrance of the Victims of the Holocaust. It began with a House resolution in 1979 that set aside April 28th and 29th, the anniversary of the liberation of the concentration camp at Dachau, as days to remember those whose lives were cut short by the… Read more

New Quaker Records Tell the Stories of Our Nation’s “Friends”

Posted by Ancestry.com on April 28, 2014 in Collections

We just released 11.5 million new records documenting one of the most prominent groups in American history, the “Religious Society of Friends,” more commonly known as Quakers. Spanning over 300 years (late 1600s – late 1900s), the collection includes birth, marriage, death, disownment, and memorial records, sourced from the Quaker’s monthly meeting minutes. About The Quakers… Read more

What You Might Have Missed: April 28th Edition

Posted by Anne Gillespie Mitchell on April 28, 2014 in Ask Ancestry Anne

Blog Posts Ancestry.com How Your DNA Can Create Aha Moments by Stephen Baloglu More Than Snow and Maple Syrup: Researching in Vermont by Amy Johnson Crow Today is DNA Day! A Day of Discovery by Anna Swayne What War Did My Ancestor Serve In? by Anne Gillespie Mitchell It’s Earth Day! How Did the Earth… Read more

How Your DNA Can Create Aha Moments

Posted by Stephen Baloglu on April 25, 2014 in AncestryDNA

We often hear the questions, “How does AncestryDNA work?” or “How do you take my spit and create these awesome results?” There are many ways to answer that question. There is a highly technical response with copious amounts of scientific data on the technology, the math and calculations, the reference populations, etc… Many times, people… Read more

More Than Snow and Maple Syrup: Researching in Vermont

Posted by Amy Johnson Crow on April 25, 2014 in Research

What’s the first thing you think of when you think of Vermont? Snow? Maple syrup? How about land conflicts and boundary changes? Those last two might not show up in travel brochures, but they are definitely important parts of Vermont. The land that is now Vermont has been fought over by Native Americans, the British,… Read more

Today is DNA Day! A Day of Discovery

Posted by Anna Swayne on April 25, 2014 in AncestryDNA

In 1953 scientists shared their discovery of the double helix. In 2003 scientists completed the human genome project. Today AncestryDNA celebrates a few achievements we’ve had. And, we want to make it even easier for you to start to making a few discoveries of your own – take a DNA test. So, what ground-breaking advancements… Read more

What War Did My Ancestor Serve In?

You know you should look for military records for your ancestor, but what war did he serve in? Our friends over at Fold3 created this handy little infographic to use as a rule of thumb. There are exceptions to every rule, but this will get you started!   If you want to dig a little… Read more

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Here you will find informational, and sometimes fun, posts from the folks behind the scenes here at Ancestry.com. We hope you’ll notice just how passionate we are about family history and about the products we’re building to help connect families over distance and time.

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