I’ve Been Told I’m Scots-Irish…Am I Irish? Am I Scottish?

Posted by Anne Gillespie Mitchell on March 17, 2014 in AncestryDNA, Ask Ancestry Anne

What is Scots-Irish or Scotch-Irish? It generally refers to the group of about 200,000 immigrants that made their way to America in the 1700s from the Ulster province of Ireland. They were Protestants who settled in large numbers in Pennsylvania and then migrated either south into Virginia and the Carolinas or westward into Ohio, Indiana Read More

Kiss Me: I’m Irish Too!

Posted by Juliana Szucs on March 14, 2014 in AncestryDNA, Ask Juliana

Reading Anna Swayne’s blog post, Luck of The Irish: How Irish Are You?, I was reminded of the friendly sibling rivalry between my sisters and I shared when it came to who was more Irish. I can confirm Anna’s find that proximity to being born near St. Patrick’s Day does not factor in when it comes Read More

Competition as Collaboration – Ancestry.com Handwriting Recognition Competition

Posted by Michael Murdock on March 14, 2014 in Operations

We are excited to announce that the Ancestry.com handwriting recognition competition proposal was accepted as one of seven, official International Conference on the Frontiers of Handwriting (ICFHR-2014) competitions. As part of our competition on word recognition from segmented historical documents, we are announcing the availability of a new image database1, ANWRESH-1, which contains segmented and labeled Read More

What Do Boston, Philadelphia, and Pittsburgh Have in Common?

Posted by Julie Granka on March 14, 2014 in AncestryDNA, Holidays

At AncestryDNA, we’re celebrating Saint Patrick’s Day a little differently than most. We’re exploring how we can use genetics to study Irish heritage in the U.S. Throughout our nation’s history, millions of individuals from Ireland planted new roots here in the United States. While hundreds of thousands of Irish immigrants arrived in the 1600’s and 1700’s, Read More

Women of the West

Posted by Amy Johnson Crow on March 14, 2014 in Website

March is Women’s History Month. Women are sometimes hidden in history and in the records we use in our research. Husbands leave bequests in their wills to “my beloved wife.” Women are listed as “Mrs. John Smith” in newspaper articles. It can be challenging to pull out the stories of the female half of the Read More

Ancestors in The Buckeye State: Ohio Research Guide

Posted by Amy Johnson Crow on March 13, 2014 in Research

Ohio has a place in many of our family trees. Whether they were just passing through or they put down roots, many of our ancestors (mine included) called Ohio “home.” As an original gateway to the west, Ohio drew in people from across the east and south. Connecticut claimed much of the northeastern part of Read More

DNA and the Masses: The Science and Technology Behind Discovering Who You Really Are

Posted by Melissa Garrett on March 12, 2014 in DNA, Operations, Science

Originally published on Wired Innovation Insights, 3-12-14. There is a growing interest among mainstream consumers to learn more about who they are and where they came from. The good news is that DNA tests are no longer reserved for large medical research teams or plot lines in CSI. Now, the popularity of direct-to-consumer (DTC) DNA tests Read More

Luck of The Irish: How Irish Are You?

Posted by Anna Swayne on March 12, 2014 in AncestryDNA

Growing up I always thought I had to be more Irish than any of my other siblings because I was born the day before Lá Fhéile Pádraig (Saint Patrick’s Day)—one day early I might add; my due date was actually the 17th. Knowing this, and since my birthday was celebrated with all things green most Read More