Comments on: The Faces Behind AncestryDNA’s Ethnicity Regions http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/03/26/the-faces-behind-ancestrydnas-ethnicity-regions/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=the-faces-behind-ancestrydnas-ethnicity-regions The official blog of Ancestry Mon, 26 Jan 2015 16:02:56 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.5.2 By: Melaniehttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/03/26/the-faces-behind-ancestrydnas-ethnicity-regions/#comment-223794 Melanie Sun, 06 Apr 2014 01:38:11 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=15706#comment-223794 I took the test because my Dad was adopted in the 1920′s and we have no information about his birth family. Based on the test, it looks like they were at least partly Irish, as I am showing 38% Irish and there is zero Irish on my Mom’s side. On the other hand, Mom was half German and I am showing very little Western European.

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By: Pamelahttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/03/26/the-faces-behind-ancestrydnas-ethnicity-regions/#comment-223224 Pamela Sat, 05 Apr 2014 01:12:42 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=15706#comment-223224 I found out a few blood lines I was unsure of but were confirmed.
However, I am wondering about the lack of information and non information regarding my European Jewish lines that did not turn up when I know without a doubt I have several ancestors from Spain that were Conversos came to the New World and settled in what is now New Mexico in the US. My maternal line goes back to Rabbi Salomon Ha Levi?

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By: The Faces Behind AncestryDNA’s Ethnicity ...http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/03/26/the-faces-behind-ancestrydnas-ethnicity-regions/#comment-221260 The Faces Behind AncestryDNA’s Ethnicity ... Tue, 01 Apr 2014 20:40:23 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=15706#comment-221260 [...]   [...]

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By: top What You Might Have Missed: March 31st Edition World Newshttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/03/26/the-faces-behind-ancestrydnas-ethnicity-regions/#comment-220830 top What You Might Have Missed: March 31st Edition World News Mon, 31 Mar 2014 20:43:36 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=15706#comment-220830 [...] The Faces Behind AncestryDNA’s Ethnicity Regions by Anna Swayne [...]

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By: Kellyannehttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/03/26/the-faces-behind-ancestrydnas-ethnicity-regions/#comment-219777 Kellyanne Sat, 29 Mar 2014 21:00:58 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=15706#comment-219777 It seems like every one else is having trouble showing their American Indian heritage as well. My children have native american indian blood but it doesnt show up in the tests results. Is that a flaw in the test?

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By: Culsenhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/03/26/the-faces-behind-ancestrydnas-ethnicity-regions/#comment-219257 Culsen Sat, 29 Mar 2014 01:45:14 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=15706#comment-219257 The most important thing to remember when doing DNA : your genetic lineage is NOT your paper lineage. Who you came from began thousands and thousands of years ago. My female Haplogrouping is J – so my ‘first’ mother showed up they believe 50,000 years ago. There is NO way I will ever know who she is.. just that she had children, and those children continued to populate the earth.. as well as travel the continents.

My paternal Haplogroup is I1 – considered the Stonemasons, and they are over 30,000 years old. All those that came in between the original father and my own will never be known.

Autosomally, my groupings seem to match what we see on paper going into the 1500s on some lines (english, german, norwegian and danish – those countries that kept very good church records, making it somewhat easy to track ancestors)

And always remember: our ancestors traveled. Just because they lived in Germany for 400 years, does not mean THEIR ancestors didn’t come from Asia -just as an example. They will be mixed with others in the current region, but if the DNA was there to pass down, it is what it is. One cannot change what DNA is. Get others within your family to test for a larger truer scale of WHO you are, who you all are comprised from

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By: Ruth Detjenhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/03/26/the-faces-behind-ancestrydnas-ethnicity-regions/#comment-219105 Ruth Detjen Fri, 28 Mar 2014 18:17:09 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=15706#comment-219105 I was surprised by the 3% from the Iberian Peninsula. Who were these people, what were their names – I have yet to find any Portuguese or Spanish in my tree.
The 13 % African was not a surprise and most percentages came from West Africa. I wonder if the Iberian genes were mixed with the African genes during the years of the slave trade .

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By: William J Gagnehttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/03/26/the-faces-behind-ancestrydnas-ethnicity-regions/#comment-218658 William J Gagne Thu, 27 Mar 2014 21:30:04 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=15706#comment-218658 In the many years that I have done research almost everything is accurate, on my fathers side all links lead back to France, all the family has been in Canada from the beginning, With one exception the test shows no Native American ties, yet I know for a fact my 2nd great grandmother was full blooded, and further back there are 2 more links, but the rest was fine, the English all came here in the great migration, with 2 even on the Mayflower and the Germans came here in the 1850′s, a little disappointed, on the one hand, but I do understand all matches don’t show up!

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By: Adrianahttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/03/26/the-faces-behind-ancestrydnas-ethnicity-regions/#comment-218558 Adriana Thu, 27 Mar 2014 17:16:56 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=15706#comment-218558 You didn’t say what your DNA admixture breakdown is, but there’s a good chance that anything being classified as western or northern European, Scandinavian, etc. is coming from your German ancestry. These regions have a lot of overlap genetically and DNA tests can’t necessarily distinguish. Strictly speaking, there’s no German ethnicity. The DNA test can only look at the markers in your DNA, compare those to sample populations, and then make an educated guess about your admixture. When you look at Scandinavia on a map, you can see why Germans and Scandinavians might be genetically similar.

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By: Jannihttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/03/26/the-faces-behind-ancestrydnas-ethnicity-regions/#comment-218208 Janni Thu, 27 Mar 2014 03:09:21 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=15706#comment-218208 When will the surname and location search feature be functioning in tandem again? It would be nice to have an update on what is happening with that feature.

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