Ancestry.com

4 Things To Do Before You Donate Your Genealogy

Posted by Amy Johnson Crow on February 20, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site

You’ve worked hard on your family tree and your research contains countless clues for other researchers. You don’t want to let those materials go to waste. Maybe you have a family member who is as passionate about genealogy as you are and has agreed to take all of your books, notebooks and research papers. But… Read more

MyCanvas @ RootsTech: Meeting New Cousins and Sharing Your Work

Posted by Pam Velazquez on February 19, 2014 in MyCanvas

Last week I was working at the RootsTech Conference in Salt Lake City, UT. I was fortunate to be a presenter at the conference on MyCanvas and used my own tree and my own projects to demonstrate how MyCanvas works. At the end of my class, a woman approached me and said that she was related… Read more

An Atlas of the Mixing of Human Populations

Posted by Julie Granka on February 19, 2014 in AncestryDNA

Written records have detailed the varied histories of human groups over the past few thousand years.  While some groups remained isolated, other groups spread far and wide across the globe.  When they did, they encountered and “mixed” with other human groups – mixing both their people and their DNA.  That history has left its signature… Read more

What You Might Have Missed: February 18th Edition

Posted by Anne Gillespie Mitchell on February 18, 2014 in Ask Ancestry Anne

This is a pretty long list! I bet you missed something this past week! Blog Posts Ancestry.com Can’t find a marriage? Check for Marriage Mills by Juliana Smith Hey Oregon! Happy 155th Statehood Day! by Anne Gillespie Mitchell Ask Ancestry Anne: I’m Having a Hard Time Researching My African American Ancestors by Anne Gillespie Mitchell DNA Testing… Read more

Highlights From RootsTech 2014

Posted by Pam Velazquez on February 17, 2014 in Ancestry.com Site

Last week the Ancestry team was at the RootsTech 2014 conference in Salt Lake City, Utah – a global family history event where people can come together and share about their genealogy experiences and the technologies that make them possible. What We Taught While we were there, many members from the Ancestry team lead sessions… Read more

Can’t find a marriage? Check for marriage mills

The genealogist in us diligently records the marriage date and place, and the family historian wonders about the story behind that date. If we’re fortunate, we may have a photograph of the happy couple on their wedding day, or some other memento of the occasion. A story may have been passed down through the family.… Read more

Hey Oregon! Happy 155th Statehood Day!

Posted by Anne Gillespie Mitchell on February 14, 2014 in Research

Oregon has been the home of more than 20 Native American tribes.  It’s natural resources attracted the Spanish, the Russians, the English and a host of others looking for riches and a better life.  It was the destination of those who traveled the Oregon Trail starting in Independence, Missouri.  If your ancestors are from Oregon,… Read more

Ask Ancestry Anne: I’m Having a Hard Time Researching my African American Ancestors

Posted by Anne Gillespie Mitchell on February 13, 2014 in Ask Ancestry Anne, Research

This month’s question: Answer: I found the census records that you referred to, and as you stated, the family’s race varies among the 1910, 1920, 1930, and 1940 census records. It should be noted that on the 1930 and 1940 census there were no instructions for individuals of mixed race. Citizens were either one race… Read more

DNA Testing for Adoptees—AncestryDNA Has the Power to Unlock the Answers in Your Story

Posted by Anna Swayne on February 13, 2014 in AncestryDNA

In the past year, many of you have shared stories of how AncestryDNA has helped you find family. Some of the most moving are stories of adoptees that have connected with their birth family. Here are two powerful and touching stories that found their way to the national spotlight: Chris Burton was simply hoping to discover… Read more

New Content: Medicos, Taxpayers and Railroaders

Posted by Paul Rawlins on February 12, 2014 in Collections

Was there a doctor—or midwife—in the family? The New Zealand, Registers of Medical Practitioners and Nurses, 1873, 1882–1933, database lists all sorts of state-approved medical practitioners.   Meanwhile, back in England, the West Yorkshire, England, Tax Valuation, 1910, itemized (as it were) more than half a million residents for tax purposes.  Rhode Island, Vital Extracts, 1636–1899,… Read more

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Here you will find informational, and sometimes fun, posts from the folks behind the scenes here at Ancestry.com. We hope you’ll notice just how passionate we are about family history and about the products we’re building to help connect families over distance and time.

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