Comments on: Can’t find a marriage? Check for marriage mills http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/02/14/cant-find-a-marriage-check-for-marriage-mills/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=cant-find-a-marriage-check-for-marriage-mills The official blog of Ancestry Tue, 30 Jun 2015 19:32:13 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.5.2 By: Friday Finds – 02/28/14http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/02/14/cant-find-a-marriage-check-for-marriage-mills/#comment-207047 Friday Finds – 02/28/14 Sat, 08 Mar 2014 00:30:12 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=14909#comment-207047 [...] Can’t Find a Marriage?  Check for Marriage Mills, Ancestry.com [...]

]]>
By: Jameshttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/02/14/cant-find-a-marriage-check-for-marriage-mills/#comment-200927 James Sat, 22 Feb 2014 22:06:08 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=14909#comment-200927 Juliana, just as an interesting aside, you mentioned in the late 17th and the first half of the 18th century in England couples were required to post banns – I got married in Scotland in 1965 and we were still required to post our banns.

]]>
By: Pamela Marie Galvan Tamezhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/02/14/cant-find-a-marriage-check-for-marriage-mills/#comment-200140 Pamela Marie Galvan Tamez Fri, 21 Feb 2014 05:34:01 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=14909#comment-200140 I have been trying to find out if my GG grandparents Sea Captain Joseph Thompson and Mary Lucy Vernon were ever married. The fact is this that Joseph was married when he met my GG Grandmother Mary Lucy, we think in Ireland, she was a servant of one of his cronies. He was a very wealthy ship owner had a wife in England and they had 5 children already by the end of the 1850s. Mary Lucy was just a young girl when they met, he was about 30 years older than her. He set her up in a Mansion home in Liverpool England where she was born and then eventually brought her to America Madison Greenwood Kansas she had two children in England by him and the other four in the USA, all born by 1890. His wife died in 1884. He stayed in America that we know of and never went back, but when he came to America he brought 3 of his sons from his marriage so they knew about Mary Lucy. We know they told everyone they were married and if they were they would not have married until after 1884, no record has been found at all on them. I wonder if they were secretly married and it was not recorded. Where do you think we could look?

]]>
By: Terence Davishttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/02/14/cant-find-a-marriage-check-for-marriage-mills/#comment-198596 Terence Davis Mon, 17 Feb 2014 17:54:06 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=14909#comment-198596 The town of Corinth, Mississippi in Alcorn County was a known marriage mill in the middle part of the 1900′s and maybe earlier. Due to its loose rules, and location near the corner of Mississippi, Tennessee, and Alabama, it was a very popular marriage destination. My parents were married there in 1954. Every time I mention to someone from that area that my parents were married there, they reply that they hear that often.

]]>
By: Rhiannonhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/02/14/cant-find-a-marriage-check-for-marriage-mills/#comment-198035 Rhiannon Sun, 16 Feb 2014 00:02:15 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=14909#comment-198035 Many of my family married in Clay County, Arkansas. They had a “special” exemption from the three day wait period. The JP decided all marriages were special and would perform same day marriages. I had family travel from Indiana, Missouri, Kentucky, and Texas to get their special marriage taken care of from 1920 to 1950.

]]>
By: Mary Sanphilipo-Wardhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/02/14/cant-find-a-marriage-check-for-marriage-mills/#comment-197986 Mary Sanphilipo-Ward Sat, 15 Feb 2014 19:15:19 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=14909#comment-197986 Ellicott City & Elkton, Maryland are two such towns.

Ellicott City had the distinction of being the end of the streetcar line. People would all pile on the streetcar and head out of town for a day excursion. They would get married, then have a picnic in the country before heading back into town.

Elkton was so close to the borders of Delaware and Pennsylvania that it became known as the Gretna Green of Maryland.

]]>
By: Maureenhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/02/14/cant-find-a-marriage-check-for-marriage-mills/#comment-197979 Maureen Sat, 15 Feb 2014 18:40:05 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=14909#comment-197979 I have 2 sets of GG Grandparents that I can’t find marriage records. They lived in Cleveland and Youngstown, but were born in Youngstown, PA and NY. I’ve only accessed online sources. Any ideas?

]]>
By: Phyllishttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/02/14/cant-find-a-marriage-check-for-marriage-mills/#comment-197976 Phyllis Sat, 15 Feb 2014 18:01:48 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=14909#comment-197976 My parents went to St Charles, Mo. and lot of my relatives were married there. Apparently it was easy to get married there. Also Shawneetown, Il was an easy place to get married.

]]>
By: Juliana Smithhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/02/14/cant-find-a-marriage-check-for-marriage-mills/#comment-197741 Juliana Smith Sat, 15 Feb 2014 01:22:14 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=14909#comment-197741 One of the things I found helpful was newspapers, but there are a lot of ways you can find this information. Books on research in a particular state, or research methodology in general. or check wikis, like the Red Book section of the Ancestry.com wiki. http://www.ancestry.com/wiki/index.php?title=Red_Book:_American_State,_County,_and_Town_Sources The Indiana section leads with some of the prevailing law. http://www.ancestry.com/wiki/index.php?title=Indiana_Vital_Records

Another resource I have on my book shelf is “The Hidden Half of the Family: A Sourcebook for Women’s Genealogy,” by Christina Kassabian Schaefer. A lot of great information in that book as it regards to women and women’s rights under the law.

Check out the periodicals of local genealogical and historical societies as well. They may have historical background on their websites. The USGenWeb can be another good resource. (http://www.usgenweb.org)

In some cases you may even find state statutes online, but the availability and format will vary by state.

My favorite way to learn about the law would probably be by following The Legal Genealogist, Judy Russell’s blog. http://www.legalgenealogist.com/ She addresses topics like this with humor and in an easy to digest way. And if you ever get the opportunity to hear her speak, do not pass up the chance. She is fantastic. Hope this is helpful!

]]>
By: Frank Sperlinghttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2014/02/14/cant-find-a-marriage-check-for-marriage-mills/#comment-197717 Frank Sperling Fri, 14 Feb 2014 23:49:30 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=14909#comment-197717 Interesting story Juliana. How does one even begin to look into prevailing laws of the time?

]]>