Comments on: Advanced Research Tip: Five Things You Should Do With Every Record http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/10/29/advanced-research-tip-five-things-you-should-do-with-every-record/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=advanced-research-tip-five-things-you-should-do-with-every-record The official blog of Ancestry Thu, 27 Nov 2014 23:12:21 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.5.2 By: Lesliehttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/10/29/advanced-research-tip-five-things-you-should-do-with-every-record/#comment-220260 Leslie Sun, 30 Mar 2014 18:12:32 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=12832#comment-220260 Ancestry Anne: I agree with Matt and Carrie – we need more space for notes on Events in Ancestry. I try to get all the info from a census or other record on each individual’s timeline, but with large families there just isn’t room to note all the facts. I do copy and paste my notes to every individual’s timeline. Example for a census record: Smith, John, 58, VA/VA/NC, farmer, M.35y; Mary, 55, VA/NC/NC, wife, 11/7 [children born/living]; Joe, 18, VA/VA/VA, son, carpenter, S; O’Hern, Lizzie, 28, IRE/IRE/IRE, servant, Wd. And so on, and the same note would be copied to John, Mary, and Joe. But there’s only so much room, so possibly important facts get left out. I do have FTM for Mac, but I use it only to create reports. I do not search from there – it is too tedious. All my work is done on Ancestry.

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By: Bonnie Trailhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/10/29/advanced-research-tip-five-things-you-should-do-with-every-record/#comment-166363 Bonnie Trail Mon, 09 Dec 2013 06:17:04 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=12832#comment-166363 I am looking for information on my Great Grandmother who never married but used her brothers name for her children. The family said the kids father was native american. How would you work with that? any suggestions. Thanks

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By: Frankie Guinlehttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/10/29/advanced-research-tip-five-things-you-should-do-with-every-record/#comment-148962 Frankie Guinle Thu, 31 Oct 2013 15:38:33 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=12832#comment-148962 I was frustrated in not finding some records of my father….and me. I dug and dug and finally found the page containing our address in the 1930 census. Lo and behold…..not only was my family left off the census, so were three of our neighbors. That may screw up a lot of genealogists. We had a telephone (party line) and I had a library card but according to the 1930 census, we did not exist. I also noted on the census all of the house on the west side of Vance Street were there but only2 houses on the east side (including me) were there. We lived at the corner of 23rd and Vance, our address was 2221. Across 23rd street at 2301 Vance, the Wiser family was left off also. After 81 years let it be known that Vernon Franklin James, Besse Thaxton James and Frankie Laverne James lived at 2221 Vance Street, Little Rock, Pulaski County, Arkansas in 1930

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By: BEEhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/10/29/advanced-research-tip-five-things-you-should-do-with-every-record/#comment-148888 BEE Thu, 31 Oct 2013 11:39:04 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=12832#comment-148888 Carrie, THANK YOU! I did find it! I somehow got into that horrible “NEW SEARCH”. I dread the day that it will be all we have, but that doesn’t explain some of the ridiculous “hints” I’ve been getting for people. Documents that have no connection to the person as far as I can see, unless I’m missing something.
A marriage record “hint” for a woman – the only connection is her maiden name is the same as the groom’s surname!

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By: Carriehttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/10/29/advanced-research-tip-five-things-you-should-do-with-every-record/#comment-148610 Carrie Wed, 30 Oct 2013 19:57:25 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=12832#comment-148610 Matt, in your Ancestry tree there is always a “description” area for the events in each person’s profile. Click on the event such as residence, (not the source) and a new screen comes up for editing. You can add any kind of text in the description box. I think there is a limit the number of characters so you may have to abbreviate. Not positive ’bout the number.

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By: Carriehttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/10/29/advanced-research-tip-five-things-you-should-do-with-every-record/#comment-148607 Carrie Wed, 30 Oct 2013 19:50:00 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=12832#comment-148607 Bee, old search is still there. Call 1-800-262-3787 for help finding it. It has never moved but if you don’t where to look you can miss it.

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By: Ancestry Daighttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/10/29/advanced-research-tip-five-things-you-should-do-with-every-record/#comment-148561 Ancestry Daig Wed, 30 Oct 2013 17:14:51 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=12832#comment-148561 Thought of two other important comments…

If you can not see the image clearly send a “fix it please”. It can easily be re scanned and added back in, so anyone following you can now have an easier time viewing the source. There aren’t nearly as many now as when I started researching, back in 2000.

The 1930 Census also shows the YEAR a couple first became married. If one was married before the current marriage things won’t add up for one of the couple and you now have a year for another marriage.

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By: Ancestry Daighttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/10/29/advanced-research-tip-five-things-you-should-do-with-every-record/#comment-148557 Ancestry Daig Wed, 30 Oct 2013 17:00:40 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=12832#comment-148557 One very important thing hasn’t been mentioned yet. The actual date the Census was taken. In the actual image it shows on the upper right of the page. For example, 24th day of April 1940. This is important when adding the source to a person. Let’s say the person died 27 Apr 1940. If you don’t list this in our tree for the correct and exact date of the Census record it may show at the BOTTOM of his page, after his death, and everyone seeing that will tend to assume the death date is incorrect, and then will have to again go over what has already been found. Happy treasure hunting…

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By: Ancestry Annehttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/10/29/advanced-research-tip-five-things-you-should-do-with-every-record/#comment-148550 Ancestry Anne Wed, 30 Oct 2013 16:27:08 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=12832#comment-148550 The suggestion to ALWAYS look at the image before and after is a great suggestion. I’m glad you all mentioned that. Gold genealogy stars all the way around! :-)

Matt, you can write or type things and put them in your tree. I type them up and put my thoughts in Family Tree Maker.

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By: Debbiehttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/10/29/advanced-research-tip-five-things-you-should-do-with-every-record/#comment-148503 Debbie Wed, 30 Oct 2013 13:41:48 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=12832#comment-148503 By looking at the census original image down the left of the page is often listed the street name and house #. I found a family member who had been estranged from the family and later forgotten by later generations living just a few blocks from her brother. By using google I saw both houses in 2012 and mapped just 5 blocks between them !

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