Comments on: Things To Do Before You Start Building Your Online Tree http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/10/01/things-to-do-before-you-start-building-your-online-tree/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=things-to-do-before-you-start-building-your-online-tree The official blog of Ancestry Fri, 31 Oct 2014 08:50:18 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.5.2 By: Teresa Lewishttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/10/01/things-to-do-before-you-start-building-your-online-tree/#comment-138899 Teresa Lewis Mon, 07 Oct 2013 05:04:58 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=11828#comment-138899 I’ve researched for over thirty-five years and the number one thing I’ve learned is that you should talk as soon as possible to older relatives. It’s never too soon. What a wealth of information I missed out on by waiting too long. They are now gone. Also, if they will allow it, use a tape recorder. If not take very good notes. Unfortunately, some relatives don’t want you to take notes or use a recorder. You’ll just have to be a good listener and then write down what you heard as soon as you get a chance. Also, there is a certain way to ask about family history and a way not to because sometimes relatives don’t want to discuss things. It’s a matter of learning how to talk to them without seeming like you are prying.

]]>
By: Laurice Hubka Johnsonhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/10/01/things-to-do-before-you-start-building-your-online-tree/#comment-137399 Laurice Hubka Johnson Wed, 02 Oct 2013 20:19:43 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=11828#comment-137399 When I started researching my husband’s family (which he and his siblings really knew nothing about) I asked his sisters and brother for ANYTHING that they had of their mother’s that had a name/date/place on it – even if the didn’t recognize it. The BEST thing I got, was their mother’s autograph book – from the 1930′s which her Aunts and Uncles and cousins signed, dated and told WHERE there were when they signed it. This helped be to break that first brick wall down (my mother in law’s mother’s maiden name and where she grew up). My sister in law had NO IDEA who those people were that signed her mother’s book and because of that was about to toss it out! ASK for what you need from people who may have the answers – even though they don’t think they know anything about the family. You may both be surprised.

]]>
By: Barbara Ferber-McCarthyhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/10/01/things-to-do-before-you-start-building-your-online-tree/#comment-137094 Barbara Ferber-McCarthy Wed, 02 Oct 2013 02:02:34 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=11828#comment-137094 It is vitally important that people new to family history and genealogy research know the 1st golden rule of research:
VERIFY EVERYTHING!
This includes things like family bibles. One of my family members jumped the gun and noted in her bible that her 2nd husband adopted her two children from the first marraige. Further research led to court documents from which I found out that the biological father- although he abandoned the mother and his 2 young children- out of spite he refused to give up parental rights. This plus family letters helped to verify the family story that the first husband would only give up rights if the 2nd husband paid him a large sum of money! The woman and her new husband having morals against the selling of human beings refused to make payment. So even though the family bible said the children were adopted by the 2nd husband, they were not.

]]>