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New Content: Nonconformists, Military Registers, Cali Marriages, and the Baker Roll

Posted by Paul Rawlins on September 13, 2013 in Ancestry.com Site, Content

Not everybody comes to the U.S. via New York. Maryland, Crew Lists of Vessels and Airplanes, 1910-1954, is just that, an image-only collection of crew lists for both ships and planes that arrived in Baltimore during the first half of the 20th century.

If your English ancestors were nonconforming types—you know, Methodists, Baptists, Presbyterians, and the like—they may turn up in this extensive collection of England & Wales, Non-Conformist and Non-Parochial Registers, 1567-1970.

noncom burial

 

You can find out who got what (and who didn’t) among your First State ancestors in Delaware, Wills and Administrations, 1683-1947, or whether they were working on the railroad in U.S., Northern Pacific Railway Company Personnel Files, 1890-1960.

U.S., Cherokee Baker Roll and Records, 1924-1929, is an important database for Native American researchers, the final official list of recognized members of the Eastern Band of North Carolina Cherokee.

baker inset

 

The California, Marriage Index, 1949-1959, provides a decade worth of names and ages for bride and groom, along with a date and county.

My favorite record in U.S., Military Registers, 1862-1970, is Herbert Victor Wiley, on blimp duty in L.A.:

us military dirig

 

And once the gold rushes started, Sydney became a boom town that didn’t stop booming. The New South Wales, Australia, Sydney Improvement Board [1871-1896] was formed to keep the city’s buildings ship shape.

 

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