Posted by on September 10, 2013 in Who Do You Think You Are?

Best known as brainiac Sheldon Cooper on The Big Bang Theory, actor Jim Parsons has always had acting in his blood. But he wonders where it comes from — and what else was passed down along his father’s family line.

On tonight’s season finale of Who Do You Think You Are? Jim travels to New Orleans, Paris and Versailles and finds generations of men who left indelible marks on the arts and sciences — even history.

Jim’s family’s cast of characters includes a learned doctor taken before his time and an architect to the king of France with some very remarkable friends. In medical journals, newspaper reports, baptismal records, royal letters, and even a neoclassical chapel designed by his ancestor, Jim discovers the pieces left behind that add up to the total of his story. And he determines it is more than a coincidence that these are his blood relations.

Say “au revoir” to this unforgettable season at 9|8c on TLC.

 

Who Do You Think You Are? Episodes from Season 4:

 

About Kristie Wells

Kristie is Ancestry's Global Head of Social Media and Customer Engagement and is responsible for developing and managing the company's social media and social business offerings worldwide. She works with a team of community managers and social content developers to help educate Ancestry's existing customers, inspire new family historians and expand awareness into new social audiences and communities. She has a deep love of family history and is currently trying to break through the brick wall of her Christophier line (that we all know is really the 'Christopher' surname) and to one day prove - or disprove - the baron line of the Wells family. It shall be done.

10 Comments

Pat Holloway 

I love the show, however, I never get to see it since you took it off of NBC. I try to watch it on TLC, but it usually freezes up and I don’t get to see all of it. I wish something could be done to make it so everybody can see it.

September 10, 2013 at 12:02 pm
Dani Oldroyd 

I can’t wait! Your show is so inspirational and really get me in the mode to work on mine. I am ready for it!

September 10, 2013 at 4:26 pm
Sheri Beach 

I love this show, and Jim Parsons’ family story was amazing! However, the Honey Boo Boo Countdown clock that was prominently displayed in the upper right hand corner for the entire hour nearly ruined it for me. Too much visual clutter and really irritating program advertising on the screen distracted from an awesome episode.

Please, please, can you get TLC to treat WDYTYA with a little more respect? You guys deserve better! Awesome job on this season, loved it (TLC’s ads, not so much).

September 10, 2013 at 8:27 pm
Jeff Record 

Good show over all. Jim Parson’s interest in his father’s ancestry did not seem feigned or put on, but rather quite heart felt. Mr. Parson’s story was also enjoyable because his connections back to France were very decent and honorable. I was happy for him to have found that his ancestor hosted so many from the Age of Enlightenment. It was good to to see what sources are out there with regard to genealogical research in the Southern U.S., an area that often gets over looked in favor of New England. @ Sheri above – I could not agree more – the countdown clock to Honey Boo-Boo was a bit much – sort of like a fly that won’t leave you alone. I think that TLC is not helping either program by putting “pop-ups” like that during programs of very unrelated content – each show attracts a different audience. Overall it was a great season , and a solid effort by Mr. Parsons. I would have enjoyed seeing more of his Parsons direct male line. – Grade B-

September 11, 2013 at 8:15 am
Nate J 

I enjoy the show immensely. I would enjoy it more if more tricks and tips were inserted in the story arc. I get ideas on different physical archives I can visit from WDYTYA. But how often am I going to be able to go to the France National Archives in Paris? I also appreciate the show for the historical context it adds to each genealogical quest.

I would like more info like, how were the journals of Louis Trouard found? How would I, as a non-celebrity who doesn’t just have to buy the plane tickets and wait for someone to approach me with my ancestor’s information, find out where journals can be found? Libraries? Our National Archive? Could there be some kind of small interview with the genealogists who found these records?

September 11, 2013 at 8:53 am
Peggy Holt 

Please keep the series going. It’s one of the few programs my husband and I enjoy.

September 11, 2013 at 9:07 am
observer 

This was by far my favorite of the series. Parsons is such a gracious person and his expressions of gratitude to each of the researchers was enjoyable to watch.

Parsons plays such a “stoic” type of character on his series so it was nice to see another side of him. And his quest for information – having heard that he had French ancestors – shows that oral family history is often very helpful in beginning your search.

Thanks again for this episode. Well done, intentioned, and Parsons’ reactions etc. felt very real.

September 11, 2013 at 10:45 am
vashikaran 

I love this show, and Jim Parsons’ family story was amazing! However, the Honey Boo Boo Countdown clock that was prominently displayed in the upper right hand corner for the entire hour nearly ruined it for me. Too much visual clutter and really irritating program advertising on the screen distracted from an awesome episode.
Please, please, can you get TLC to treat WDYTYA with a little more respect? You guys deserve better! Awesome job on this season, loved it.
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September 12, 2013 at 5:31 am
Vashikaran 

Please keep the series going. It’s one of the few programs my husband and I enjoy.
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October 2, 2013 at 11:48 am
Love vashikaran 

Great show over all. Jim Parson’s enthusiasm toward his father’s heritage finished not appear pretended or put on, but instead very heart felt. Mr. Parson’s story was additionally pleasant on the grounds that his associations over to France were good and respectable. I was cheerful for him to have found that his precursor facilitated such a variety of from the Age of Enlightenment

April 11, 2014 at 10:47 pm