Comments on: Four Steps to Finding Your Civil War Ancestors http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/08/16/four-steps-to-finding-your-civil-war-ancestors/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=four-steps-to-finding-your-civil-war-ancestors The official blog of Ancestry.com Tue, 29 Jul 2014 11:46:19 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.5.2 By: Karinhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/08/16/four-steps-to-finding-your-civil-war-ancestors/#comment-220706 Karin Mon, 31 Mar 2014 16:00:05 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=10893#comment-220706 You failed to mention the U.S. Colored Troops. You should describe them — 180,000 black men fought in the USCT and about 20,000 were in the US Navy. You should explain that if the man was enslaved he will not appear in the 1860 Census but that this is a way to locate male slaves after 1860. The enlistment record will likely reveal the last slave owner, which is key to researching slaves. Also, the USCT pension records reveal physical descriptions, and names of wives and children. Freedman’s Bureau records do contain some marriage records. The database is on Ancestry.com.

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By: Sherryhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/08/16/four-steps-to-finding-your-civil-war-ancestors/#comment-220360 Sherry Sun, 30 Mar 2014 23:08:33 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=10893#comment-220360 It is my understanding that some men were excused from the Civil War; if he could pay $300, he would not have to enlist; is this correct? If so, are there records of the men who did pay the $300?

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By: Nathan Markshttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/08/16/four-steps-to-finding-your-civil-war-ancestors/#comment-220349 Nathan Marks Sun, 30 Mar 2014 22:45:37 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=10893#comment-220349 Identifying Civil War soldiers in my family is what got me into genealogy when I was in middle school.

I have identified 14 grandfathers, 93 biological uncles, 45 uncles-by-marriage, and am currently attempting to identify all my first cousins who served. I am less than halfway through my tree and have already identified 286 of them. It will take me several more months to look at each male first cousin, but it will be worth it. I keep an extensive spreadsheet to keep track of them all.

What I always caution people doing Civil War research about is making sure it is THEIR ancestor who they found in records. There are many cases where multiple men with the same name and from the same state all served, and it’s important not to mix them up. I posted an article on my blog last year differentiating five men named Micajah/McCager Napier, all 5 of whom served in the Civil War. One of their descendants got a Confederate headstone for their ancestor…but the unit the headstone represented belonged to a different man of the same name who actually served the Union. I have a newspaper clipping where a woman got a Confederate headstone for her ancestor. That man shared the same name as my uncle. Well, it was my uncle who served in that unit, not her ancestor of the same name. So it’s important to be careful.

There are a lot of websites dedicated to various units, and will tell you the men of each Company were from. If your ancestor was living in Union County, Arkansas, but the men in the company you found that his name on the muster roll were from Benton County, Arkansas (complete opposite end of the state), then it probably isn’t your ancestor.

It is important to correspond service records with the 1860 Census. If your Ancestor is in Perry County, Kentucky in the 1860 Census, and the service record for the man you think is your ancestor enlisted in Perry County, then it is probably the same man. It’s even possible if it is an adjacent county. But some “Kentucky” units were made up of Indiana men, and some “Missouri” units were made up of Arkansas men, so you always need to make sure all the records correspond and you don’t end up claiming your ancestor served in a unit he didn’t serve in and it’s just another man of the same name.

I enjoy http://researchonline.net. It has name indexes for Civil War soldiers by state, though it is not 100% complete. That comes in handy when there’s a chance your ancestor’s name could be spelled incorrectly or indexed incorrectly. The NPS website does not search for variations of a name. I found Eversole cousins listed as Eversale and Haddix cousins listed as Haddicks that I would not have found if I didn’t see it in index form, so that site can be quite useful.

Lastly, this is to Ancestry Anne: It appears we are cousins through the Hash family of Grayson County, VA. I had 3 Hash uncles who served (Andrew, John, and Joseph B), and my Hash 1st cousins who served include Alexander, Allen, Allen C., Byron B., Elbert S., Jerome C., Levi, Marshall, Robert, Wilburn, and William C.

Some of my Hash-related research has given me a bit of a headache. Any chance you are willing to compare notes or answer some questions on the family via e-mail? I would really value the input of a professional such as yourself. Thanks.

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By: Annhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/08/16/four-steps-to-finding-your-civil-war-ancestors/#comment-117217 Ann Mon, 19 Aug 2013 21:56:27 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=10893#comment-117217 Another useful database is the U S Civil War Draft Registrations http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=1666

I found 2 recently arrived Irish 2nd great grandfathers, in New Jersey, in that database.

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By: Ancestry Annehttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/08/16/four-steps-to-finding-your-civil-war-ancestors/#comment-117198 Ancestry Anne Mon, 19 Aug 2013 20:58:46 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=10893#comment-117198 Thanks for the suggestion Russ. :-)

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By: Russ Worthingtonhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/08/16/four-steps-to-finding-your-civil-war-ancestors/#comment-117197 Russ Worthington Mon, 19 Aug 2013 20:57:42 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=10893#comment-117197 IF you have the Family Tree Maker program, you can to this:

http://ftmuser.blogspot.com/2011/07/how-to-identify-civil-war-family.html

Russ

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By: Annettehttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/08/16/four-steps-to-finding-your-civil-war-ancestors/#comment-117048 Annette Mon, 19 Aug 2013 13:38:10 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=10893#comment-117048 Another good source of information often overlooked is the data base of the Homes for Volunteer Soldiers, a haven for thousands of Civil War veterans until they closed around the time of WW II. There were homes all over the United States and they took in pretty much any ill or down-on-his-luck CW vet. That data base is on Ancestry and a Google search will give you the background and locations of the homes. Much genealogical data is included, including the person to be notified in the case of serious illness or death. My paternal grandfather’s much older half-brother was in several of these homes, and died in the San Francisco Bay Area home — buried at a small National Cemetery in Napa.

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By: Andy Hatchetthttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/08/16/four-steps-to-finding-your-civil-war-ancestors/#comment-116834 Andy Hatchett Sun, 18 Aug 2013 22:08:20 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=10893#comment-116834 Re: #7 Lisa

It isn’t possible using the Online trees but with a standalone desktop program you can get reports that do about the same thing and/or can be manipulated into such.

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By: Lisahttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/08/16/four-steps-to-finding-your-civil-war-ancestors/#comment-116421 Lisa Sat, 17 Aug 2013 18:28:25 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=10893#comment-116421 Spreadsheets are a great place to start, but it has always seemed to me I should be able to make such a query of my family tree and select the data to export to Excel, rather than creating a spreadsheet manually. Is this possible?

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By: Larryhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2013/08/16/four-steps-to-finding-your-civil-war-ancestors/#comment-116411 Larry Sat, 17 Aug 2013 17:59:54 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=10893#comment-116411 Unfortunately, this advice is nearly useless if, like me, you can’t find your man in the 1860 census. {My brick wall.} My GGG grandfather Hiram Smith appears to have landed in a UFO in Iowa in 1870; he didn’t bring any brothers or cousins with him. He’s probably from PA(tho’ 1880 census says NY). Pennsylvania had 14 Civil War soldiers with this name; I’ve been able to eliminate only 2.

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