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AncestryDNA honors moms this Mother’s Day with a DNA test that’s for women too

Posted by Stephen Baloglu on May 12, 2013 in AncestryDNA

Mother’s Day. It’s the perfect time to show the woman who made you who you are just how much you love her. And now, you can discover even more about who you are, who your mom is and about all the other moms in your family tree.

Did you know that AncestryDNA is our newest, most powerful DNA test that’s available to both men and women? So anyone can take the test. And it covers all lineages in the family tree going back for generations. Since you inherit half of your DNA from your mom, it covers her entire side of your family including your mother’s mom, her mom, your great-great aunt and even your great-grandma’s sister. You get the picture. Of course, the test covers her dad’s side of the family too, but this weekend, it’s all about Moms.

What you get when you take the AncestryDNA test

Your ethnicity going back 500-2,000 years. You’ll discover the ethnicities that make you who you are and explore them on an interactive map. These results include your mother’s side of the family.

Meet a 2nd cousin for the first time. You’ll receive a list of DNA matches—people who you are matched to that could be your 3rd, 4th or even 2nd cousin!

Break through brick walls. When you find a new relative (our AncestryDNA customers have found over 1 million already) it can plow through roadblocks in your family tree and help fill in those empty branches.

Continuous updates, included. Once you take the test, you’ll continually get updates and receive new matches. The discoveries don’t just happen the day you get your results. They’re ongoing.

 

Test Mom, too, and see how much more powerful your experience becomes

Find out just how much you’re really like your Mother. You’ll gain a deeper understanding of your ethnicity when you compare your results to your mom’s and hone in on the overlapping ethnicities. Since you don’t inherit exactly 50% of your mother’s ethnicity, you can see just how much of that fiery Irish free-spiritedness was passed down to you.

Expand on your mother’s side of the family tree. Compare your matches to your mom’s list and find the ones you share. Those new cousins are from your mother’s side of the family, now you have a focused place to research, so starting add them to your tree!

Go back even further with an older living ancestor. When your mom takes the DNA test, you can go back another generation and gather even more information about that side of the family. While you’re at it, why not test Grandma?

Easily view multiple results in your account. The AncestryDNA interface and easy-to-use site and tools allow you to manage and access more than one DNA test result in your profile to help power your search even more.

 

If you weren’t able to pull this off in time for Mother’s Day, why wait until next year? Sharing amazing discoveries like these with your mom really doesn’t require a special holiday. Take your mother on a journey you both won’t forget and try AncestryDNA for only $99. What better reason to order two? Order AncestryDNA now.

 

10 comments

Comments
1 brianna cashMay 14, 2013 at 11:47 am

i don’t have a credit card so how can i get this

2 Cornelia KlasterMay 14, 2013 at 12:29 pm

http://records.ancestry.com/Harm_Klaster_records.ashx?pid=164652989 Is my father. He did not die in Hengelo but in Germiston! His grave: http://www.eggsa.org/library/main.php?g2_itemId=751381 Greets C.J. Klaster.

3 Angie BushMay 14, 2013 at 2:19 pm

Is AncestryDNA phasing data now (with something besides Beagle)? My mother’s and my ethnicity predictions would lead one to believe we have totally different genetic backgrounds (Obviously, we show up as mother and daughter, though). I know 23andMe re-adjusts their ethnicity predictions if a parent has tested to be more in line with reflecting that. Any plans for that to happen with the Ancestry test?

4 Margaret CarterMay 17, 2013 at 10:32 am

I received a DNA kit for Mother’s Day …YEAH! BUT would it be more productive for me to test a male in my family? I keep reading that it’s for both but I am still unclear or just not understanding exactly about the results.
If I test myself will I only have the results for my mother’s side of the family?

5 Pat KolkmanMay 20, 2013 at 5:25 am

So tell me, how do I find out if the DNA test I’ve already taken includes Mitochondrial DNA matches? So far, the “matches” you’ve sent me have been a bust. Out of hundreds of possibles, one has been real.

6 Linda QuinlanMay 30, 2013 at 10:41 am

When I tried to download my maternal DNA, nothing showed up. Why is that?

7 CameronJune 11, 2013 at 2:59 pm

I’m AM VERY MAD THERE’S ALWAYS A PROBLEM WITH THE RESEARCH IT WON’T GIVE ME A ANSWER SOOO FIXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX IT PLEAS THANKS I GEUSS :( >: >:( >:|>:)

8 BrookeJuly 6, 2013 at 9:19 pm

I just received my new DNA test. I thought it would give a specific breakdown. I have 66% west African DNA , but there are more than 10 countries listed as “possible “origins. I don’t see that as helpful at all. I also know that on my mothers side, there is a huge Scandinavian background which was not shown at all. There is also Native American background also not represented!

9 Anita Louise Bass DemmonsSeptember 5, 2013 at 2:54 pm

how come my DNA thru my blood brother says that I am an
E1b1b? those I believed to be my ancestors says that they are
haplogroup A. Can haplogroups change from one to another in a
matter of 6-8 generations? I am not happy trying to figure all this
out and I almost wish I had not had the DNA test done with you and
I am leery of going with another DNA testing org. HELP!!!

10 Anita Louise Bass DemmonsSeptember 5, 2013 at 2:58 pm

The saliva DNA for me says that I am mostly Scandanavian and
then British Isles and Central European and 2% undecided. It sure
conflicts with my brother’s DNA which says we are from Africa and
spread out from there. CONFUSING to say the least.

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