Ancestry.com

Las Vegas: The Marriage Capital of the World

Posted by Nick Cifuentes on February 6, 2013 in Ancestry.com Site

The Vegas wedding has become an iconic part of pop culture since 1931, when the new marriage law in Nevada was passed allowing couples to marry on the spot with no wait times or requirements. Since then couples of all kinds including celebrities have been getting hitched in Sin City. With the convenience of time and money, Vegas weddings have become increasingly popular, boasting over 100,000 couples married in Vegas since 1995. As much as the Vegas wedding has become popular for its convenience, it’s become more recognizable for being prone to breakups. As much as people would like to think, “What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas,” marriage records like those found on Ancestry.com remain permanently archived. Although they may not last forever, getting married in Vegas is still one of the most popular places to say “I do”. Just how many couples tie the knot in Vegas? Take a look at the infographic below for some interesting Nevada marriage facts. Feel free to share this with friends and family!

Ancestry.com: Las Vegas – The Marriage Capital of the World – An infographic by the team at Ancestry.com: Las Vegas Weddings

Embed Ancestry.com: Las Vegas – The Marriage Capital of the World on Your Site: Copy and Paste the Code Below

9 comments

Comments
1 GiveMeABreakFebruary 6, 2013 at 2:11 pm

Are you people serious????

You have database issues that haven’t been addressed in over 2 years. You have programming bugs every time you try and give us a site “improvement.” You barely have enough servers to guaranty an adequate uptime. You have a 1940 census whose index transcription is an abomination.

And yet you can squander resources on developing crap like this. And pay someone to post it. Are there any adults in charge here?

2 Andy HatchettFebruary 6, 2013 at 5:10 pm

Why on God’s green earth would anyone with an ounce of taste be interested in the code needed to embed that space gobbling dreck on their website?? !!!

3 jairofgodFebruary 7, 2013 at 3:33 am

No es nada de otro mundo que se casen en las vegas donde le quitan el dinero a las pobres humanidades con la esperanza que se van a conseguir dinero, pero se van sin nada

4 jairzinhoFebruary 7, 2013 at 3:40 am

Married in Vegas as if one fuer anything not worth deserves respect is the best day of your life

5 Ed RoccoFebruary 7, 2013 at 1:07 pm

At least it’s not another great, great, great, boring, boring, boring, load of RV travel log blather.

6 Bertram TrumpingtonFebruary 7, 2013 at 2:07 pm

I was married in Vegas by an Elvis Presley impersonator. I was dressed as Dolly Parton and my wife as Johnny Cash.

7 Long time userFebruary 7, 2013 at 3:33 pm

I agree this blog is a waste of resources, both personnel and time. I’m not happy my money goes to this kind of stuff.

Fire the dolt who gave the ok on ths!

8 BEEFebruary 10, 2013 at 5:58 am

I guess this is as good a place as any to say how much I dislike the “new” merge record feature.
Sometimes I don’t want to add all the information listed, such as parents and 15 siblings, but you now have to scroll all the way down to the bottom to add the original person’s information.
Also, why the redundant “residence” – I’ve been clicking that off – when I remember, or having to go back to the overview and do it. Unfortunately, at one point, I was clicking off the year on the census instead, and had to go back and redo that. IMHO,another “if it ain’t broke don’t fix it”.
Another thing, if there are two entries for a marriage record – bride, groom, I prefer to have them entered individually, not have the same record go to both, or am I wrong.
I’m agreeing more and more on the 1940 US Census: Kraus – transcribed Hrous!

9 PaulFebruary 12, 2013 at 10:41 pm

I wish i was married in the sin city. But i think its only for people who have money and not for every one. To celebrate a marriage with pomp and pageantry we need to Las vegas.

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