Comments on: Got Scandinavian? Why your DNA results may have unexpected ethnicities http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2012/06/22/got-scandinavian-why-your-dna-results-may-have-unexpected-ethnicities/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=got-scandinavian-why-your-dna-results-may-have-unexpected-ethnicities The official blog of Ancestry Thu, 27 Nov 2014 01:11:45 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.5.2 By: Sharon Landhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2012/06/22/got-scandinavian-why-your-dna-results-may-have-unexpected-ethnicities/#comment-134012 Sharon Land Tue, 24 Sep 2013 14:36:20 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=7818#comment-134012 Hi I am also confused about all of this Scandinavian percentage. My daughter and I have both had the DNA testing. Mine came back with a 74% Eastern European and 26% Scandinavian. I can accept the Eastern European part but the Scandinavian? So then my daughter took it. Now my husbands people were all from Ireland,Scotland and England..One german grandmother..Other than that all other from mainly Ireland and England. However when she got her results they were 63% Scandinavian and 37% Eastern European. I can understand the Eastern European part but why was there not even a “slice” from the British Isles..Majority all Scandinavian .There are not ANY Scandinavians known in any of our backrounds. ???

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By: Michael Smothershttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2012/06/22/got-scandinavian-why-your-dna-results-may-have-unexpected-ethnicities/#comment-128876 Michael Smothers Mon, 16 Sep 2013 00:18:02 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=7818#comment-128876 Yes, Scandinavian seemed obsurd until you realize how influential the scandinavians dna was on northern England and Ireland. I too am sure the 38% Scandinavian genes originates in Scotland and Ireland. The rest, 39% west African, and 13% Southern Europe is probably accurate. Ancestry needs to clarify this, instead of making us think we’re Vikings, Even though this is where it originates.

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By: Johnhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2012/06/22/got-scandinavian-why-your-dna-results-may-have-unexpected-ethnicities/#comment-108954 John Wed, 24 Jul 2013 11:32:33 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=7818#comment-108954 My ancestral breakdown shows 38% British Isles (about what I figured) and 54% Scandinavian, which is totally wrong. I know that I am about half German — SOUTHERN German from Wurttemberg and Switzerland. I’ve found 90% of my great-great-great-great-grandparents, and there’s just nowhere in my family tree for such a large percentage of Scandinavian blood to hide. All four of my grandparents have German blood, and many of my lines go back to the 17th century. My test doesn’t show that I have ANY central European ancestry, which leads me to think that the “Scandinavian” result includes a lot of German as well.

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By: Kaliahttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2012/06/22/got-scandinavian-why-your-dna-results-may-have-unexpected-ethnicities/#comment-104145 Kalia Tue, 02 Jul 2013 21:35:10 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=7818#comment-104145 What i find quite interesting after reading several blog posts and comments and doing my own research (by the way i am african-american and have 31% Scandinavian) is that we (Americans with Scandinavian results) are having the same discussions as the Brits, Scottish and Irish. The Brits, Scottish and the Irish and reporting the same findings in regards to Scandinavian DNA being found in large amounts in certain parts of the British Isles. So instead of disqualifying your results based on Ancestry.com testing methods, you should probably do some research.

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By: Jessehttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2012/06/22/got-scandinavian-why-your-dna-results-may-have-unexpected-ethnicities/#comment-92657 Jesse Mon, 20 May 2013 15:13:47 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=7818#comment-92657 I am trying to understand how my father, with many lines tracing back to Jamestown, and almost all lines in Virginia for a long period of time, can be 97% Scandinavian. Wouldn’t all this time in Virginia alone show some British Isles blood? I’m not saying its wrong, but I would love an explanation on how this is possible.

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By: Shannonhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2012/06/22/got-scandinavian-why-your-dna-results-may-have-unexpected-ethnicities/#comment-63276 Shannon Tue, 15 Jan 2013 02:02:21 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=7818#comment-63276 Dorothy & Rebecca, I feel your pain. I’ve done a lot of research on my tree and take pride in it. I have around 10 Mayflower ancestors and many more that came in the great migration. I was really disappointed when no British Isles ancestry showed up in my results. According to Ancestry I am 59% Scandinavian, 17% Central Euro., 15% Southern & 9% uncertain.

The results seem to be the opposite of the tree. Very strange.

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By: Rebecca Sonnickhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2012/06/22/got-scandinavian-why-your-dna-results-may-have-unexpected-ethnicities/#comment-61163 Rebecca Sonnick Tue, 18 Dec 2012 20:06:07 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=7818#comment-61163 There are 2 parts of the Autosomal DNA ancestry.com results. One is the “Shared Ancestors in Common” cousins results. Which helps find new “cousins” and/or helps to “prove” your paper family tree is going in the correct lineage. The other is the ethnicity results. I find the “cousin” matching part very helpful. I have matched with “cousins” who I know for a fact are cousins. And, I have found that many of the matching “cousins” shown (who I ddn’t know were cousins) I can find 1, 2 or 3 “Shared Ancestors in Common.” I make sure that I review the “very low – low confidence” matching “cousins”, because I have found many shared ancestor’s in common among them. Even some 4th cousins in “very low confidence” results. There are many of the matching DNA “cousins” who have only a few people on their family tree. Of course those “cousins” trees are not helpful at all. All I can figure is that they are adopted people looking for biological parents and siblings? There also are high, moderate, low and very low confidence DNA “cousin” results that I have no idea yet how they would be my “cousin.” But they probably are.. The “Shared Ancestors in Common” probably has not been entered yet on my or their family tree. I am getting good use out of this “cousin matching” results of the DNA test. I have found 3 unknown matching “cousins” who all have the same “mystery person/people” on their family trees. They all are of “high confidence” results. I haven’t so far been able to know how this is, and how I am 3rd and 4th cousins to them. but because of a couple of “dead-end walls” I have on my family tree, I can’t figure it out. But maybe somehow, something will help solve it. Now.. the ethnicity results part of the test is something else.. I think ancestry.com might have their Scandinavian and their British Isles results mixed up somehow. And, I wish they would listen to people’s concerns. Why do so many people who are from strong Scandianian heritage end up having a high percentage of British Isle when they don’t know of a British Isles ancestor? Why do so many people who feel they should have a high percentage of British Isles show up with a high percentage of Scandianivan instead? (and some show 0% British Isle)? It seems to me that somewhere there must be a mistake. Ancestry can try to explain the high percentage of Scandinavian to people who believe they should instead have a high percent of British Isles instead (you know the Saxons’s, the Normans. the Vikings, etc.) But what kind of explanation do they have for the people who are from a strong line of Scandinavian’s and show a high percent of British Isles, when that person knows of no British Isles ancestor? That’s really strange. This does not make sense. I am one who believes my results should have shown quite a bit of British Isles percent, as my grandmother was Scotch, English and a very small amount of German. I have 13 verified Mayflower Prigrim great. great… grandparents. A Scotch lineage – who married into the Royal English families. I also, have many, many ancestor’s who came from England. I know of no one in my very large family tree who was Scandinavian. My results were 50% Scandinavian – WHAT!!, 47% Central European (the European makes sense). and 3% unknown. If people who only have ancestors who were Scandinaivan end up being 40% British Isles..how in the world do I end up with 0% British Isles?? I am very happy to get shared matches to others who have the same English ancstors as I do. Many of my “shared cousin” matches are to my English and Scotch ancestors. The people/cousins I am “matching” are people who show a very high percentage of British Isles ethnicity. Some don’t have any Scandinavian or Central European like I do. So even though I show no British Isles ethnicity. I am matching with others who show only British Isles ethnicity. As I say, I am glad to have these matches, they are the majority of my matches. But I think that ancestry.com show take a very good look at what is going on with their Scandianivan and British Isle results. It’s like up is down and down is up.

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By: Dorothy Estellehttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2012/06/22/got-scandinavian-why-your-dna-results-may-have-unexpected-ethnicities/#comment-61026 Dorothy Estelle Sat, 15 Dec 2012 14:32:01 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=7818#comment-61026 I, too, am critical of the DNA ethnic test results. Mine said 59% Scandinavian and 41% Central European. The Central European is certainly believable–about what I would expect. I believe the 59% Scandinavian is entirely incorrect. The lines that did not come from France and Germany (the 41%) came to America from the British Isles, mostly in the 1600′s. I belong to the Mayflower Society with 3 Mayflower ancestors. I have direct lines to innumerable British immigrants who came to America during the Great Migration. The latest Scandinavian blood that I believe I have is from Anglo-Norman families who came to the British Isles with The Conqueror. And they inter-married with other Britains. I might believe a tiny bit of Scandinavian, but I cannot believe that most of my DNA is derived from Scandinavia after over a thousand years of mixing with British blood. I wonder what data base was used to determine ethnic origins of our DNA. It appears to me to be defective.

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By: Mayhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2012/06/22/got-scandinavian-why-your-dna-results-may-have-unexpected-ethnicities/#comment-60703 May Mon, 10 Dec 2012 15:06:12 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=7818#comment-60703 My test results were surprising in some ways. First was the Scandinavian factor, since I have none of these names for 500 or more years. Then it immediately ocurred to me that my tree had Irish and Scottish ancestors, as well as Normans, so no surprise there, after all. I expected to find more Central European, as my research indicates about 1/3 of my tree is German, but had only 9%. However, the test said 21% Eastern European, and I have discovered no ancestors from Eastern Europe. This was the real surprise.
As for the price, I found it to be remarkably inexpensive. I have had tests done by another company, and paid around $300.

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By: Nancy Wrighthttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2012/06/22/got-scandinavian-why-your-dna-results-may-have-unexpected-ethnicities/#comment-60035 Nancy Wright Mon, 26 Nov 2012 22:08:08 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=7818#comment-60035 I must defend the DNA test as I was able to find a third cousin once removed that I had no idea about prior to the test. I now have an entire new branch of my tree! So, at least in that case, the test was very successful.
However, my sister recently had her DNA test done, and I find that we only share six (out of 8 she received and 15 I received) fourth to sixth cousins. I am wondering if anyone knows how this can be?
I am frustrated that Ancestry.com doesn’t have someone available to answer broad questions such as this one. As a matter of fact, I have not been able to find a way to contact Ancestry.com at all to get an individual response.

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