Posted by on June 15, 2010 in Company News, Content

If you haven’t already heard the good news, we wanted you to know that we have agreed to acquire the leading Swedish family history website Genline.se. While the deal is still not final, we expect the acquisition details to be determined over the next month.

Almost 4 million Americans claimed Swedish heritage in the 2000 US census, so I’m sure many of you are as excited as we are.

Though many of the details are still being determined, this newest addition to the Ancestry.com family has access to a collection of Swedish church records that contain more than 26 million digitized pages of records spanning more than 400 years from the 16th to the 20th century.  These records consist of birth/baptismal, confirmation, marriage, death/burial, church ledgers and household examination rolls. These are the main sources of genealogical information in Sweden.

For those of you that have already started your Swedish research, you’re well aware that we launched Ancestry.se, a site focused in Sweden, back in 2007. Altogether, we currently have more than 7 million Swedish records, including emigration records, vital records, newspaper clips and parish records. Together with Genline.se, we will become the destination for people wanting to learn more about their Swedish family history.

Once the deal has completed more details will be provided around the future plans for the business and also the access we will be able to give Ancestry.com customers to this wealth of Swedish content.

In the meantime, you won’t have to wait too long for more Swedish records to come online. Separate from our deal with Genline.se, in the coming months, we will be adding the Gothenburg, Sweden, Passenger Lists, 1869­-1950 collection, which contains more than 1.2 million Swedish records.

About Heather Erickson

Heather Erickson is Head of Global Communications for Ancestry.com and has been with the company since 2009.

15 Comments

Julie 

That is great news! I recently started digging into the Genline collection – over the course of my initial 2 week subscription, I found 26 records spanning across 6 generations of my ancestors! And I feel like I’ve barely scratched the surface!

Needless to say, I’ve purchased another subscription plan to continue my research :)

Looking forward to seeing how you tie this service into Ancestry.com!

June 15, 2010 at 1:30 pm
Dana 

Fantastic news. The Swedish church records on Ancestry currently stop in the 1800s, a little too early for my Swedish line. Hopefully this helps to push the time line to a little later for my research.

June 15, 2010 at 1:51 pm
Carole 

Bohemian – Czech records? There was a huge exodus of Czechs into Chicago and the parish records from that country would be appreciated.

June 15, 2010 at 4:26 pm
John 

Great!! I have started looking at genline and was kind of intimidated by the Swedish language. Will our present subscription to Ancestry cover access to genline?

Either way I’m really looking forward to this. Please email me when the transaction is complete.

June 15, 2010 at 5:02 pm
liz 

Hey this is great!! Hopefully I’ll get lucky and find more info on my Swedish relatives!! Gonna pass the news on to a cousin!!

June 15, 2010 at 5:19 pm
Marianne 

This is fabulous news! The Genline records are wonderful. I had no idea that the Swedes were just great record keepers. Though the records are in Swedish, it is very easy to figure out once you learn some of the basic family history related terms. Great job Ancestry!

June 15, 2010 at 5:53 pm
Darlene 

I’ve had a subscription off and on with Genline, and am very excited it’s now going to be included in Ancestry.com. Hopefully, this will be happening soon.

June 15, 2010 at 9:56 pm
BCarol 

Will these databases from Sweden be included in the “Recently Added Databases” when they come online? I ask this because I’ve noted for some time that so many of the databases added are in German.

Since I have no German ancestors, I find myself wading through and sometimes missing a database in English that I am interested in because it is mixed in with the multitude of German databases.

Has ancestry ever considered refining “Recently Added Databases” to categorize them by language? I think it would be a great help for anyone looking in any language. It would also be very helpful to see if the English language databases which seem to have faded in numbers are being updated.

June 16, 2010 at 1:00 pm
Laurice Johnson 

for #3 Carol:
SOME of the czech records are available now for free at familysearch.org on the pilot/records site. THey are not complete or indexed and you MUST know the parish, but if you do you might get lucky. Also the records at the TREBON archives (http://digi.ceskearchivy.cz) (parish records) are online as well. They (the Czech government) are trying to get them digitized for the whole country and available for free.
Good luck.

June 16, 2010 at 11:04 pm
BEE 

This is great news for someone of Swedish heritage. Also,I check “Recent Genealogy Databases” every day, and envy those of German ancestry with all the information that is posted there!
sigh…….I wonder if I’ll ever see anything from Poland?
If the statistics are correct, there are twice as many Poles as Swedes in the US, so I think there would be great interest in any records that could be acquired, which I realize might be more difficult then other countries, but I continue to hope.

June 17, 2010 at 5:26 am
Sherry 

I love ancestry and am in no way trying to interfere with their great news

That being said, would like to add that Sweden has also been partially indexed by the family search pilot site. The url is: http://pilot.familysearch.org/recordsearch/start.html#start

Personally, I find both ancestry and the pilot site great partners in research!

June 20, 2010 at 3:50 pm
BEE 

What a pleasant surprise to check “Recent Genealogy Databases” this morning and see an entry from Poland!”Great directory of Krakow and Foothills” according to “google translate” – although I don’t know what year it covers.
I purchased translation software a number of years ago, including two upgrades, but find this “google translate” often does a better job. It’s not perfect, but between it, “Poltran” – another online translator and my software, I can pretty much figure out what my cousin in Poland is trying to tell me.
It won’t help in translating the text, since you can’t “cut and paste” from it, but you can at least do the “table of contents” to know where to look. I actually found a list of people with my maiden name.

June 21, 2010 at 6:38 am
Adell Nelson 

some of my family are from sweden. so maybe I can find which part of Sweden they came from and when they came to the US.

June 21, 2010 at 4:06 pm
Betty J Schmidt 

I have used Swedish Genline in the past and am thrilled that it will be available through you in the near future. I was planning to susbscribe to them once more to do so finish work. Now I will wait. Thanks much

June 27, 2010 at 7:03 am
Sue 

Looking forward to seeing how my world subscription works with Genline. If I have already subscribed to Genline, will Ancestry credit me with a longer subscription? Should I wait for Anc to be the provider of the Genline data rather than subscribing now? I’m about to go to Sweden and will be attending a genealogy conference there. Wonder of wonders, the conference will conduct virtually parallel sessions in Swedish and in English. One sessions will differ.

June 28, 2010 at 9:36 pm