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World Archives Project Releases New Projects

Posted by afechter on May 10, 2010 in Ancestry.com Site

Last week we released two new projects – one for keying and one for searching…

The New South Wales, Australia, Applications and Admissions to Orphan Schools, 1817-1833 database is now available to be searched which brings the total number of databases completed through the World Archives Project to 20!  This database details the plights of orphans in New South Wales.  Although it can be sad to read through the letters stating why the “orphans” are being admitted it is just so intriguing.  Congratulations to the contributors who worked on this project!

We also released a new keying project , Mecklenburg-Schwerin Census, 1919.  This really is a pretty simple project to key as it is in standard forms so the information to key is in the same spot.  The handwriting can be a little difficult to read but over all is is pretty clear.  To see a small sampling of the records in this project you can click here to read the help article (see if you can read “Hermann” in the Vorname column) and in case you get stuck you can turn to the community for help by visiting the message board.

About afechter
Anna is the Community Operations Manager for Ancestry.com. In this role her main responsibility is managing the World Archives Project. You can send an email to Anna at afechter@ancestry dot com.

3 comments

Comments
1 jomahaffeyMay 10, 2010 at 4:50 pm

They overcharge. They never let me know that they would charge for a year at once! What kind of scam is this? They need to be reported to the BBB!

What a rip-off

2 Andy HatchettMay 10, 2010 at 7:41 pm

Just because you failed to fully read and understand the agreement before you completed it is *NOT* Ancestry’s fault. The terms *are* there in black and white.

3 RodneyMay 12, 2010 at 8:33 am

I agree with Andy.

Besides, the BBB give Ancestry.com a score of “A+”.

Ha! :)

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