Comments on: Who Do You Think You Are? Episode 4 – Matthew Broderick http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2010/03/26/wdytya-matthew-broderick/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=wdytya-matthew-broderick The official blog of Ancestry Sun, 05 Jul 2015 16:08:52 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.5.2 By: Christina Martindale-Ojedahttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2010/03/26/wdytya-matthew-broderick/#comment-45270 Christina Martindale-Ojeda Mon, 05 Apr 2010 00:57:45 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=3321#comment-45270 I found this episode with Matthew most interesting…because, I am related to him! I am not even kidding. My fathers great great grandfather is also Robert Martindale. Robert and Charlotte had several children, one was John Henry, who had a son Edward, who had a son John Edward, who had my dad Richard Edward in 1956. My dads father died in 1958 when my dad was only 2 yrs old, so he does not know alot about that part of his family. I found a family tree online a couple years ago and with what info we did have from my dad and his sisters, I was able to get a glimpse into my dads paternal family. Seeing Matthew Broderick discover his family and realizing they are my family as well,was insane! The show also gave me info, I otherwise would not have the time or money to get myself. Normally I would want to get in contact with Matthew or his sister Janet, but since he is a celebrity, I feel awkward. I would only want to get whatever info he has and share what I have. Its is very strange to grow up and know nothing about such a big part of your heritage. I am not sure what to do about it. I really could use more info, as I would like to make my dad a family tree. Either way, it was a great episode and very informative, in more ways than one, for me anyhow.

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By: Kerryhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2010/03/26/wdytya-matthew-broderick/#comment-45246 Kerry Sat, 03 Apr 2010 14:57:24 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=3321#comment-45246 I agree that this is “entertainment value genealogy”, in other words most of the tedium is erased for tv consumption.
I have some grudging respect for ancestry.com in bringing what was heretofore a subject for stuffy long time researchers (like me)to the “masses”. Therein lies the rub. Gobs of sloppy, undocumented research to sift through, the fees, and the mean-spirited “flamers”, who respond to correction information in a fashion only the invisible face of the internet can offer.

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By: Juliahttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2010/03/26/wdytya-matthew-broderick/#comment-45224 Julia Tue, 30 Mar 2010 00:21:28 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=3321#comment-45224 It was nice but I think I would be more interested in the average american….these people on the show seemed to get very little information from the ancestry.com site. It mainly came from genealogist and from traveling from one place to another.

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By: Teiahttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2010/03/26/wdytya-matthew-broderick/#comment-45223 Teia Mon, 29 Mar 2010 23:40:31 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=3321#comment-45223 I find these shows interesting. But as you can see they do pick well to do Actors. What about the little guy? It would be interesting to see a normal Joe get his family researched for free by Ancestry.com.

As for me, I have been finding it hard to find stuff on my people. I finally found a link to my g g g grandfather to a LTC Brewer of the Confederate Army (took me 2 years). But still, I need the 1890 census of Ohio to put the ! on my work. I am hoping that states did keep copies of that census. I will find out next year.

As to people saying this cost to much… I would love to see some competition out there myself.

Happy Hunting
T

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By: Blue Cross NChttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2010/03/26/wdytya-matthew-broderick/#comment-45220 Blue Cross NC Mon, 29 Mar 2010 23:19:52 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=3321#comment-45220 I don’t know about Matthew Broderick- but I’ve always been interested in learning more about my family’s history. I appreciate you posting the links to other historical sites because when I tried ancestry.com, it didn’t yield any return results for me…

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By: Karenhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2010/03/26/wdytya-matthew-broderick/#comment-45218 Karen Mon, 29 Mar 2010 19:21:17 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=3321#comment-45218 With regard to MB’s WWI history, I went through my records after this show and discovered that my husband’s uncle, just shy of his 23rd birthday, died on Nov 3, 1918 in the same set of skirmishes in France that wounded MB’s grandfather. Roy Tooley, Private, Company L, 9th Infantry. Knowing he was in that exact spot during the same time as shown on TV gave it a personal feeling. I’ve yet to discover if anyone served in the Civil War but my husband and I both have several branches living in America dating back to the 1600s, so it would be odd if we didn’t! My daughter went to Gettysburg during the 125th anniversary on July 4th, 1988. She did the battle exhibit, walked the battlefields, visited the cemetery and went up into the tower. They also had a reenactment for the anniversary. I know she was very moved.

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By: BradPatrickhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2010/03/26/wdytya-matthew-broderick/#comment-45216 BradPatrick Mon, 29 Mar 2010 15:13:05 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=3321#comment-45216 The other note about the amateur research was a specific reference in the reinterrment documentation about the last (unaccounted for) member of his unit…something that gave a higher degree of confidence. (and I haven’t gone back to Tivo and freeze frame the entry, but it was there).

I would love nothing more than to have Ancestry put together an expert seminar for the web on the specifics of their research, how producers conceptualized each episode, how experts were integrated into the process, and really how they orchestrated the whole thing. While I am grateful for the commentary on this page, a whole “making of…” bit would be spectacularly helpful.

Thanks, Brad in Tampa

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By: Bethhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2010/03/26/wdytya-matthew-broderick/#comment-45215 Beth Mon, 29 Mar 2010 15:00:18 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=3321#comment-45215 I’m curious about /what/ records were used for research in France to find the rest of Joe Broderick’s service record. Like many researching a WWI serviceman, I’m probably blocked by the records fire of 1973 and would like to look into possibilities of searching in Europe.

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By: Tom Hhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2010/03/26/wdytya-matthew-broderick/#comment-45214 Tom H Mon, 29 Mar 2010 13:19:46 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=3321#comment-45214 Gordon, according to the show, the amateur historian, Gordon somebody, identified all the members of that unit that died in the Atlanta campaign. He then located all of their graves except one, Martindale. There was one ‘unknown’ grave from that unit and all the rest were identified. Only one ‘unknown soldier’ and only one named grave unaccounted for. No other solution.

Notice that this tremendous effort was done by an amateur historian as a labor of love. Something that is not on ancestry website. This was a bit of luck as there was only one unknown.

Make a list of all the casualties from your unit in that campaign. Find all their graves. How many graves are missing? Process of elimination might narrow the possibilities.

That is something anyway. My missing CW relatives were CSA so their unmarked graves are truly ‘unmarked’.

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By: Susanhttp://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2010/03/26/wdytya-matthew-broderick/#comment-45213 Susan Mon, 29 Mar 2010 03:21:24 +0000 http://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/?p=3321#comment-45213 I really enjoyed the show and am a big fan of Matthew’s but I enjoyed the show with Emmitt just as much and I had never heard of him until that show. The sad part about Matthew not doing most of the research is he didn’t get the thrill of solving the mystery. He showed sympathy for his ancestor but I would have actually been thrilled at that moment. I would have been excited to know that I had helped tell my ancestor’s story, give a name to his monument, and help him to be remembered. I would have been thrilled that I could share this with others. Matthew only got a bit of that. He did sound like he had a touch of the genealogist’s passion when he talked about wanting to share what he had learned. Solving a 100+ mystery is a big deal and very cool for his family!

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