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First World Archives Project Record Collection Complete

Posted by Ancestry.com on December 5, 2008 in World Archives Project

Ancestry.com is excited to announce the completion of the first record collection indexed through the World Archives Project, its new community indexing program. Community contributors participating in the project indexed the nearly 60,000 records within the Wisconsin Mortality Schedules, 1850 – 1880. The Wisconsin Mortality Schedules collection was completed in the three months following the World Archives Project beta launch in September. Beginning with this collection, all indexes completed through the World Archives Project are searchable for free on Ancestry.com. 

The new Ancestry.com World Archives Project is a global initiative that gives individuals everywhere the opportunity to help index and preserve important historical records. Anyone interested in indexing through the World Archives Project can go to http://www.ancestry.com/worldarchivesproject. Soon, active contributors (those keying at least 900 records per quarter) indexing for the World Archives Project will be able to take advantage of several benefits including:

  •  Free access to all images associated with all collections keyed through the Ancestry.com World Archives Project
  • Discounts on their current Ancestry.com memberships upon renewal
  • The ability to vote on which collections are indexed next (and thereby suggest collections that may be of personal interest to them)  

Current Collections in the World Archives Project include:

Current Projects

  • Historic Postcards (France) – 40% complete

  • Lubeck Marriage Banns (Germany) - 86% complete

  • England and Wales, Criminal Registers, 1805 – 1892 – 28% complete

  • England, Newspaper Index Cards (Andrews – UK) – 14% complete

  • Nebraska State Census, 1885 – 38% complete

  • New England Naturalization Indexes – 20% complete

  • New York Naturalization Indexes – 2% complete

  • NYC Naturalization Indexes – 1% complete

  • Southern California Naturalization Indexes – 19% complete

 

We also have a few collections that are now in the arbitration process. These include:

 

Projects in Arbitration

  • Middlesex, Criminal Registers – 69% complete

  • Marriages of the Deaf in America – 71% complete

  • Alabama State Census – 89.9% complete

  • Historic Postcards (Swedish) – 69% complete

  • Historic Postcards (Italian) – 76% complete

 

11 comments

Comments
1 JoeDecember 5, 2008 at 12:56 pm

HELP! I have been trying to find some contact for a question that I cannot find addressed under the help sectiuon. Could you please forward this along to whomever would know the answer to this question?
My question is this: How do I like branches of my tree when the same person appears more than once? Example: I have an ancestor who married her husband’s uncle after her 1st uncle’s death. As such, all of the children down stream are related twice by blood. However, I cannot figure out how to connect these two branches of the family tree. Can you help?

2 JoeDecember 5, 2008 at 12:58 pm

Sorry, that should read:

HELP! I have been trying to find some contact for a question that I have, and I cannot find it addressed under the help section. Could you please forward this along to whomever would know the answer to this question?
My question is this: How do I link branches of my tree when the same person appears more than once? Example: I have an ancestor who married her husband’s uncle after her 1st husband’s death. As such, all of the children down stream are related twice by blood. However, I cannot figure out how to connect these two branches of the family tree. I don’t want to have to re-enter all of the resulting children /grandchildren / great-grandchildren…Can you help?

3 Mary-Lee GillilandDecember 6, 2008 at 10:17 am

I linked into another family’s up-line but later thought it strange that the last name paternally had changed. Though several centuries along through “Hints” I decided to research where the change had taken place and discovered the (I beleive) true up–line heritage. Now how do I UNDO all those other who are not in my tree and replace them?

4 mbyerDecember 7, 2008 at 12:10 am

You would find the person who is closest to the correct line, but is wrong and go into that person’s ‘edit profile’ under their name on their main page. Top right in the edit screen is ‘delete _____” If you delete that person all the ones behind it will be gone also.

5 terri rochier mcmurphyDecember 14, 2008 at 3:51 pm

excellent! so many resources.

6 BarbDecember 31, 2008 at 10:27 am

Someone has entered very inaccurate information into their Ancestry.com database about my grandfather and his ancestors — they have linked him to a very wrong family. I contacted the person and that person emailed me that he/she(?) would correct it. That was almost a year ago and it has not been corrected. Already other people have accessed that incorrect information and have added it to their database assuming it is correct. Help! …. I need to stop this inaccurate information from continuing to be duplicated. Perhaps if there was a place or spot on each database for “comments” it would allow me to notify others to be cautious of possible inaccurate information on that user’s databse.

7 Cindi PaladinoJanuary 14, 2009 at 5:15 pm

I’m wondering if anyone else has experienced this, and maybe your website could even address it. I was at an antique store and found a wonderful old frame for MY old family photo. However, IN the photo when I purchased it was someone else’s old family photo. The photo is in very very good condition, but I don’t just want to throw it away. I’m sure that someone would love it know it’s out there and if there was a way to find that person/s I would love to get it to them. It was a professional photo and has the name of the company and city in which it was taken. I’m sure that would be helpful to someone as well as even seeing the photo on line.

What do you think? Is there away your website could help with this? May be a “lost and found- for photos or even documents”.

Thanks.

8 terriFebruary 6, 2009 at 4:31 pm

i’m trying to consolidate all my trees under a few, ok, several key people.is there somewhere to get this info? thank you

9 Mike ClyburnFebruary 9, 2009 at 5:40 pm

I give up.
When I find one of my ancestors, which was very easy to do, ThankS !
and there is a notation afterwards like
(11/4)
What is the meaning ? of the (11/4)
Thanks..
Mike

10 vandryFebruary 18, 2009 at 10:36 pm

I been able to check http://community.ancestry.com/project.ashx?pid=31148 the pretty acurate … I would that a 4 out of 5 I know 2 people who have been able to track more info about their own tree

———————–

men’s shaver

11 andrew pinkstaffFebruary 23, 2009 at 5:48 pm

need to know the type of indian in our family

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