Origin of “Kiss Me, I’m Irish” Saying

Posted by Anna Swayne on March 6, 2015 in AncestryDNA

To get you ready for St. Paddy’s Day on March 17th, we wanted to share the story behind that famous phrase and discuss how the luck of the Irish might be in your DNA. And, this St. Paddy’s day might just be the right time for you to try AncestryDNA, if you haven’t already.

Kissing someone who is Irish is pretty much the next best thing to kissing the stone in Blarney Castle, which is likely where this famous saying comes from. According to legend, kissing the stone will give you the power of eloquent and persuasive speech. Two different stories relate kissing the stone with luck.

One dates back to 1440s when the builder of the castle, Cormac Laidir MacCarthy, was in a lawsuit and needed some extra luck. He sought out Clíodhna (goddess of love and beauty) and she told him to kiss a stone on his way to court. He did, and he won his case. Later he took that same stone and installed it into the castle.

Another legend suggests that Queen Elizabeth I wanted the land rights from Cormac Teige McCarthy. Cormac set off to try and convince the queen to change her mind, but was worried since he wasn’t a strong speaker. While traveling he ran into an older woman who suggested that if he kissed a particular stone in Blarney Castle it would give him the gift of eloquent speech. Cormac did just that and went on to persuade the queen to allow him to keep his land.

Nowadays, the stone gets millions of visitors at Blarney Castle, outside Cork, Ireland, with the hope the stone has the same impact on their own lives.

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Does the Irish luck run deep within you? Find out how Irish you are — or somebody else is — with an AncestryDNA test. So far two out of three test takers have come back with at least five percent Irish in their ethnicity results.

How’s that for lucky?

Buy AncestryDNA for you or your lucky family member and find out how Irish you are. And make sure you share your Irish results by downloading our “Kiss Me” badges below to use on your social media profiles. Enjoy!

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